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View Full Version : Don't know what to charge? Let me help.


tthomass
04-14-2007, 12:15 AM
I just replied to a post lending some helpful insight on this commonly asked question. First, I'm a professional landscaper, not an accountant but if you "burn this into your brain" you can make it through this season and into the next.

Example.
A) Question to remember: How much do I charge to put down 10 yards of mulch that costs me $20 per yard?

MONTHLY OVERHEAD EXAMPLE:
+Truck payment $1,000
+Insurances $1,000
+Wages $6,000
+Rent $1,000
+Gas and some other expenses that you CAN calculate $1,000
=$10,000
=$10,000 MONTHLY OVERHEAD PAYMENT

$10,000 MONTHLY OVERHEAD PAYMENT / 4 weeks = $2,500 per week OVERHEAD PAYMENT

$2,500 per week OVERHEAD PAYMENT / 5 business days = $500 per day OVERHEAD PAYMENT

So what we've got here is a need of $500 NET ( NET = $ after expenses ) per day just to cover operating expenses and break even.

Back to the mulch question. Costs $20 per yard and "what do I charge". Well if its plain old mulch I am around $90 per yard that leaves me $70 per yard to put towards my "$500 per day OVERHEAD PAYMENT". So 10 yards = $900 - $200 cost of mulch = $700 - "$500 per day OVERHEAD PAYMENT" = $200 profit for the day.

Did I break even there? Sure. I had a lady/tire kicker call me wanting 2 yards of mulch. I told her $500 over the phone as not to waste my time driving to her home and explained thats weeding, edging etc. She then asked how much if we don't do the edging etc, I said $500. Needless to say I did not hear back from her. Was there decent $, sure, but there is no such thing as a "quick" job. Its 1/2 day or full day after you do the running around and prep between jobs. Say I did the usual $90 per yard and instead of covering a 1/2 day "OVERHEAD PAYMENT" of $250 I come out with $140 after only the cost of mulch. I just paid her $110 for me to work..........no thanks, I just lost $.

Back to the mulch again. This time its in the back yard, up some steps, around the dog poop, through a fence and up a hill. Lets just say that 10 yards was going to be a 1 day job. Now with the added complexity of the job it will actually take me 1.5 days. My "OVERHEAD PAYMENT" is now $750 after adding the extra 1/2 day. So remember before, I was leaving with $200? Now I just paid $50 to the customer for me to work......no thanks, I just lost $.

I use mulch as it is a very simple thing we can all relate to for an example. I do understand that sometimes you need help to get a "feel" for the market such as bidding a commercial job vs a residential job. ****FIRST**** know your overhead and break it down. Don't forget to make a profit and don't forget that profit isn't just for todays thrill but also tomorrows truck you may need to buy or Bobcat or transmission that blows up when its not convienent for you.

Keep ^^^^^^this^^^^^^ in the back of your head and you'll get a feel for the industry and where your prices are. If you do, I look forward to your future "look at my new truck" post.

Hope this helps some of us rookies, I'm going to bed. :drinkup:

Coffeecraver
04-14-2007, 06:22 AM
You are :dizzy: and in no time will be out of business with your calculations
:hammerhead:

Ford Guy
04-14-2007, 08:15 AM
his calculations look good to me, keep in mind it does say MONTHLY OVERHEAD EXAMPLE

tthomass
04-14-2007, 09:03 AM
Mr. Norm........this is nothing more then trying to help some folks on here figure where they need to be $ wise to keep from working for free or at cost. There are MANY more variables that can be added to this, especially dependent upon the diversity of the company. This is probably 3rd grade math in reality but a VERY basic understanding of cash flow.

At least I'm trying to help someone get a start vs making a useless comment that doesn't bring any light to a question many people seem to have.

My business is just fine thanks.

JD657757
04-14-2007, 02:49 PM
I think that was a great post. I agree I will not waste my time chaseing around after a $100 here and a $100 there. If you do this you will not last long in this business.:weightlifter:

Lawnworks
04-14-2007, 03:42 PM
I think that was a great post. I agree I will not waste my time chaseing around after a $100 here and a $100 there. If you do this you will not last long in this business.:weightlifter:

Unless of course you do 10 -20 $100 jobs a day.

A good lesson for newbies, would be don't sink yourself in debt!! Another way to lessen your overhead per day is to work 6-7 days a week.

Bustus
04-14-2007, 03:55 PM
Unless of course you do 10 -20 $100 jobs a day.

A good lesson for newbies, would be don't sink yourself in debt!! Another way to lessen your overhead per day is to work 6-7 days a week.

I agree, many people go and buy the best of the best right away, hire many employees, and then wonder where their profits are. Grow with demand!

Duekster
04-14-2007, 03:58 PM
I don't calculate wages as OH directly but the point is pretty much right on.

Lets say you have 4K in Monthly over head.

That's 48,000. and I have 6 employees. I need to make about $4.00 per hour on these guys to cover over head.

I pay them 10.00 per hour and my burden is @45% so they cost me 14.45 per hour plus the $4.00 I need to make for over head.

I also round up some but I have to get about $20.00 hour per man 2080 hours per year just to keep the doors open.

haybaler
04-14-2007, 04:13 PM
You are :dizzy: and in no time will be out of business with your calculations
:hammerhead:

please explain? I thought it was a very good post. please have some kind of objective argument or keep it to yourself.

Lawnworks
04-14-2007, 06:15 PM
I don't calculate wages as OH directly but the point is pretty much right on.

Lets say you have 4K in Monthly over head.

That's 48,000. and I have 6 employees. I need to make about $4.00 per hour on these guys to cover over head.

I pay them 10.00 per hour and my burden is @45% so they cost me 14.45 per hour plus the $4.00 I need to make for over head.

I also round up some but I have to get about $20.00 hour per man 2080 hours per year just to keep the doors open.

How do you get 14.25? I was figuring closer to $11.25 for a $10 an hour employee. That includes matching social security, matching medicare, and 5% workman's comp.... which comes to 12.5%. How do you come up w/ your 45% burden?

Henry
04-14-2007, 07:37 PM
Workers comp numbers are not the same in every state. Here in NJ your rate differs between maintenance work and anything that involves digging.

Focal Point Landscapes
04-14-2007, 09:02 PM
tthomas - excellent advice . If you don't know what your real cost of running your business and price accordingly , it will catch up with you at some point. It is also true that this will vary somewhat based on individual circumstances . For example , hauling a 7000 pound trailer behind an 8000 pound truck results in relatively short life spans for tires , brake linings , etc that will cost far more in maintenance than a half ton pulling a lawnmower - imo we tend to underestimate maintenance costs in general . I think that too many of us are undercharging for our services .

tthomass
04-14-2007, 09:08 PM
I can calculate wage easier.............salary employee.

Fuel is an example of something to guestimate.

From what I remember workers comp here in VA is $6.99 per $100 that the employee is paid.

Fishwhiz
04-14-2007, 09:11 PM
This also indirectly illustrates the importance of marketing. You thrive when you do your marketing correctly so you are the one choosing the projects and quickly saying good bye to potential clients who do not have the financing for what you see as a quality project.

ncls
04-15-2007, 01:11 AM
How do you get 14.25? I was figuring closer to $11.25 for a $10 an hour employee. That includes matching social security, matching medicare, and 5% workman's comp.... which comes to 12.5%. How do you come up w/ your 45% burden?


Here in Ohio, it's 13.25%. If you're figuring your pay in, it may skew the total. One highly paid and one 10.00 per hour employee will raise the percentage.

AGLA
04-15-2007, 01:14 AM
Your overhead and profit margin is only half of the equation. You collect none of your overhead or profit unless you can consistently sell work. Your market determines how much you can actually get for the work no matter what your overhead and profit is. Absent of that, it would make sense that the more poorly you manage your overhead, the more you are entitled to charge. I don't think anyone believes that to be an economic reality.

The more hours you can disperse your overhead over, the less $/hr that overhead is. If you take $20k worth of mowing equipment and run it all 40 hours a week, the purchase cost of that equipment is 50% less per hour than if you run it only 20 hours. Half of you understand this and half of you will argue that it is untrue.

Lawnworks
04-15-2007, 01:20 AM
Here in Ohio, it's 13.25%. If you're figuring your pay in, it may skew the total. One highly paid and one 10.00 per hour employee will raise the percentage.

I don't see how it would skew the percentage of a $10 an hour employee... the percentage of matching ss, medicare, and workmans comp doesn't change even if it is a higher paid employee right? I can see how the total would be more, but the percentage you pay would be the same.

So on a $10 employee w/ your 13.25%, you total burden per hour for that employee would be $11.325 per hour.

Lawnworks
04-15-2007, 01:24 AM
Your overhead and profit margin is only half of the equation. You collect none of your overhead or profit unless you can consistently sell work. Your market determines how much you can actually get for the work no matter what your overhead and profit is. Absent of that, it would make sense that the more poorly you manage your overhead, the more you are entitled to charge. I don't think anyone believes that to be an economic reality.

The more hours you can disperse your overhead over, the less $/hr that overhead is. If you take $20k worth of mowing equipment and run it all 40 hours a week, the purchase cost of that equipment is 50% less per hour than if you run it only 20 hours. Half of you understand this and half of you will argue that it is untrue.

I agree... it just sucks that we cannot legally run the equipment 60 hours(w/ the same crew) a week and not pay overtime.... I think overtime is the gov't screwing w/ supply and demand economics. Probably another discussion for another time, but talk about reducing your overhead per hour!

Coffeecraver
04-15-2007, 06:03 AM
I agree, many people go and buy the best of the best right away, hire many employees, and then wonder where their profits are. Grow with demand!


You cannot make all your overhead on 1-2 jobs
Looks like to me that you are burned out and have forgotten that our
business depends on customers.
Overcharging to cover your overhead is not good
You need to reduce your overhead,you can start by getting help that dosn't take a whole day to spread 10 yds of mulch,dog piles or not.
500.00 for installing 2 yards of mulch is crazy,you cannot build a good client base with that kind of pricing.

haybaler
04-15-2007, 08:23 AM
You cannot make all your overhead on 1-2 jobs
Looks like to me that you are burned out and have forgotten that our
business depends on customers.
Overcharging to cover your overhead is not good
You need to reduce your overhead,you can start by getting help that dosn't take a whole day to spread 10 yds of mulch,dog piles or not.
500.00 for installing 2 yards of mulch is crazy,you cannot build a good client base with that kind of pricing.

all he did was give a very general basic idea of how to figure out what to charge. you all are trying to read beyond what he posted and attack him for things you are assuming. he was giving you a formula for you to input your own numbers, and your taking the example as what he does.

on another note I feel that everyone is undercharging. and you can't do 20 $100 jobs in a day. I say leave the 2-3 hr jobs for the solo operaters just starting out. any real bussiness that even has one employee has to much overhead to be doing small jobs for nothing. my motto is it's your job to afford my work, not mine to make it affordable. once your in business for 5-6 years you really relize(andfeel) your true cost of doing business. and our time is worth money. add up your time for paperwork, estimating jobs, maintenence, purchasing equipment ect... if you don't charge enough you might as well go work at wall mart and have weekends to yourself.

Duekster
04-15-2007, 08:34 AM
How do you get 14.25? I was figuring closer to $11.25 for a $10 an hour employee. That includes matching social security, matching medicare, and 5% workman's comp.... which comes to 12.5%. How do you come up w/ your 45% burden?


My comp and GL is closer to 11% then with SUTA, FUTA is closer amd matching SS it is closer to 21%. Then I have a little added for Vacation and Sic time.


lets see, if employee has two weeks per year off vacation and 3 days of PTO ( or sic time ) that is 65/2080 = 3.1 %


Employees take two 15 minute breaks per day

(.5 hours times 5 days* 50 weeks)/ 2080= 6%

Now I am at 30%

There are other things to considered as well but you get the point.

Lawnworks
04-15-2007, 09:07 AM
all he did was give a very general basic idea of how to figure out what to charge. you all are trying to read beyond what he posted and attack him for things you are assuming. he was giving you a formula for you to input your own numbers, and your taking the example as what he does.

on another note I feel that everyone is undercharging. and you can't do 20 $100 jobs in a day. I say leave the 2-3 hr jobs for the solo operaters just starting out. any real bussiness that even has one employee has to much overhead to be doing small jobs for nothing. my motto is it's your job to afford my work, not mine to make it affordable. once your in business for 5-6 years you really relize(andfeel) your true cost of doing business. and our time is worth money. add up your time for paperwork, estimating jobs, maintenence, purchasing equipment ect... if you don't charge enough you might as well go work at wall mart and have weekends to yourself.

I think it is possible to do smaller jobs and be profitable... it is all in how you price them. W/ my landscape crew we have filler days b/t projects where we do pruning, irrigation repair, and are on several jobsites a day. Not my favorite thing to do, but if YOU price it right it will be profitable.

AGLA
04-15-2007, 09:24 AM
Lawnworks,

I don't mean that the cost of your labor is affected at all. This is why I say that it is hard for a lot of people to understand.

It is only the hourly cost of buying the $20,000 worth of equipment that I am talking about - not the gas, maintenance, or labor, or anything else. Some of those costs are dependent on how much you use them - if it is parked it burns no gas,... . But, the purchase price gets paid whether you use it or not.
Example: You buy a hydroseeder for $10k. You use it on one job to do a 10,000 sf seeding job.You park it and never use it again. The overhead of your purchase price of that hydroseeder is $1 per square foot. If you use it to do 100,000 sf it is $0.10 per square foot, .... 1,000,000 sf = $0.01 per square foot.

It may cost you an additional 10 cents a sf for materials, fuel and labor to shoot that seed. But, you have to realize that a guy who shoots 2,000,000 sf (let' call him Big Jim) makes half a cent more per square foot than the guy shooting 1,000,000 (Little Jim). So, it costs $5,000 more for Little Jim to shoot 1m than it cost Big Jim to shoot the first 1m.

So, if you think that your overhead determines your prices, Big Jim is going to be charging half a cent less to shoot hydroseed than Little Jim. That might result in Big Jim taking away some jobs from Little Jim because his prices are lower. Now big Jim does 2.5m sf and Little Jim does .5m which now means it costs more per sf for Little Jim to pay for his equipment and further skews the price difference.

But chances are Little Jim is going to stay competitive with pricing so he can keep working and Big Jim will not reduce his prices, but pocket the profit instead.

One thing should be very clear. Neither Big Jim's clients, or Little Jim's clients give a rat's behind what it cost either of them to shoot that hydroseed.What matters to them is how much they have to pay. The result is that little battle that is called the free market where the guys producing the work have to find a way to get work and make money doing it while a whole lot of others are trying to get that same work. Charge too much and you lose to others charging less. Charge too little and you have to cut corners or not make enough money.

Then you have the other side. The people wanting the work done. They can pay less to have someone who might lack in skill or experience, or pay more for people who are supposed to really know what they are doing. To some, the difference in cost is not worth the extra that they are going to get even if they recognize it. To others, a few more thousand for quality or peace of mind, or better service is worth it.

We can not decide what we charge. We can only take steps to adapt to be able to meet the circumstances of what people are willing to pay.

Lawnworks
04-15-2007, 09:45 AM
Lawnworks,

I don't mean that the cost of your labor is affected at all. This is why I say that it is hard for a lot of people to understand.

It is only the hourly cost of buying the $20,000 worth of equipment that I am talking about - not the gas, maintenance, or labor, or anything else. Some of those costs are dependent on how much you use them - if it is parked it burns no gas,... . But, the purchase price gets paid whether you use it or not.
Example: You buy a hydroseeder for $10k. You use it on one job to do a 10,000 sf seeding job.You park it and never use it again. The overhead of your purchase price of that hydroseeder is $1 per square foot. If you use it to do 100,000 sf it is $0.10 per square foot, .... 1,000,000 sf = $0.01 per square foot.

It may cost you an additional 10 cents a sf for materials, fuel and labor to shoot that seed. But, you have to realize that a guy who shoots 2,000,000 sf (let' call him Big Jim) makes half a cent more per square foot than the guy shooting 1,000,000 (Little Jim). So, it costs $5,000 more for Little Jim to shoot 1m than it cost Big Jim to shoot the first 1m.

So, if you think that your overhead determines your prices, Big Jim is going to be charging half a cent less to shoot hydroseed than Little Jim. That might result in Big Jim taking away some jobs from Little Jim because his prices are lower. Now big Jim does 2.5m sf and Little Jim does .5m which now means it costs more per sf for Little Jim to pay for his equipment and further skews the price difference.

But chances are Little Jim is going to stay competitive with pricing so he can keep working and Big Jim will not reduce his prices, but pocket the profit instead.

One thing should be very clear. Neither Big Jim's clients, or Little Jim's clients give a rat's behind what it cost either of them to shoot that hydroseed.What matters to them is how much they have to pay. The result is that little battle that is called the free market where the guys producing the work have to find a way to get work and make money doing it while a whole lot of others are trying to get that same work. Charge too much and you lose to others charging less. Charge too little and you have to cut corners or not make enough money.

Then you have the other side. The people wanting the work done. They can pay less to have someone who might lack in skill or experience, or pay more for people who are supposed to really know what they are doing. To some, the difference in cost is not worth the extra that they are going to get even if they recognize it. To others, a few more thousand for quality or peace of mind, or better service is worth it.

We can not decide what we charge. We can only take steps to adapt to be able to meet the circumstances of what people are willing to pay.


Yeah I understand... I was just saying that working your crews overtime really gets the most out of your fixed assets/costs... spreading your overhead costs over 60 hours a week rather than 40 hours. It just sucks to pay time and a half.

ncls
04-15-2007, 10:52 AM
I don't see how it would skew the percentage of a $10 an hour employee... the percentage of matching ss, medicare, and workmans comp doesn't change even if it is a higher paid employee right? I can see how the total would be more, but the percentage you pay would be the same.

So on a $10 employee w/ your 13.25%, you total burden per hour for that employee would be $11.325 per hour.


I am speaking about totals, not one individual employee. Higher tax bracket pays more. An owner can exempt himself from workers comp.

tthomass
04-15-2007, 11:22 AM
Actually I did tell a lady $500 for 2yds of mulch. Reason being, she was about 30 miles from me and would take 45-50min drive one way. I told her I just can't go that far for any less and needless to say she found someone else. Now had this been someone wanting a 1,000ft2 patio or screening with 10-12' tall evergreens I would have taken the time to drive out and meet with this person if I felt that they were serious over the phone because it would be a much more cost effective job.

The rest of that post is only example and not a reflection of my, or anyone elses, overhead. Just to help give a visual or simple representation of where some of us may be with what we charge. For instance, when I used to do this on the side and make $1,000 on a job I thought I was Mr. Big Guy because all I saw was the cost of plants and what I was walking away with in comparison with the little pay check I got from the company I worked for. Needless to say I see things in a whole new perspective now.

ALGA, great post with the representation of costs with the hydro seeding. Helps me put into terms equipment usage as well. Currently I've got the International to finish paying off prior to any other purchases. What I am starting to figure is the purchase of a track machine or excavator against rentals and against the amount of usage to see if this is a good purchase to make and when it may be the right time to do so.


You cannot make all your overhead on 1-2 jobs
Looks like to me that you are burned out and have forgotten that our
business depends on customers.
Overcharging to cover your overhead is not good
You need to reduce your overhead,you can start by getting help that dosn't take a whole day to spread 10 yds of mulch,dog piles or not.
500.00 for installing 2 yards of mulch is crazy,you cannot build a good client base with that kind of pricing.

Lawnworks
04-15-2007, 01:21 PM
I am speaking about totals, not one individual employee. Higher tax bracket pays more. An owner can exempt himself from workers comp.

Higher tax bracket, but the percentage that you match on ss, medicare, and wc stays the same. The tax/wc burden percentage should be the same for all the employees.... right?

ncls
04-15-2007, 01:28 PM
Correct...

NewHorizon's Land
04-15-2007, 03:56 PM
Tthomass great post. This really helps out for new guys. And it is a good example.

Coffeecraver
04-15-2007, 05:18 PM
I agree it is a good post,it got alot of feedback

:clapping:

willietd2
04-15-2007, 05:59 PM
same here, i loved the post. if this dont open your eyes nothing will. willie

tthomass
04-15-2007, 06:38 PM
Anything anyone would like to add please do.

The better everyone can figure the better the industry. I'm no pro but when I get the chance to talk "business" with other people I jump at it.......manager of the place I rent from, lawyers, landscape business owners big and small and other contractors.....doesn't have to be your specific field but learning about marketing and networking is your friend.

Henry
04-15-2007, 06:42 PM
The tax/wc burden percentage should be the same for all the employees.... right?

Not necessarily. My w/c rate is higher for the contruction crew than the maintenance crew. It's almost double. My agent told me the reason is they get a lot more back injury claims associated with digging, moving block, setting trees, etc.

Lawnworks
04-15-2007, 07:44 PM
Not necessarily. My w/c rate is higher for the contruction crew than the maintenance crew. It's almost double. My agent told me the reason is they get a lot more back injury claims associated with digging, moving block, setting trees, etc.

You are right. There is a definate difference in w/c b/t landscaping and maintenance.

LawnsRUsInc.
04-16-2007, 04:32 AM
Might sound stupid but i wish there was some type of program that could help you me and new people to the industry to help figure out what we need per hr or day from a certain crew. I find it hard since my costs change daily and is hard to keep track of at times.

dylan
04-16-2007, 05:53 PM
This is how I do all my quotes for each job;

1) Calcuate the material costs (stone, pipe, soil) etc.
2) Calculate the labour costs example (20 hours at $15) 2 people one day
3) Calculate rental costs of equipment not in overhead.
4) Recover overhead based on lenght of job (one day = X dollars)
5) Add in the profit. This is the only part I am taking home with me and the most important.

It is really easy to negoiate. Work on reducing the materials first. Do a smaller patio or whatever. Smaller job = less labour. Less labour means less over head cost. I don't touch the profit if it can be helped.

Lawnworks
04-16-2007, 07:57 PM
Another thing to remember is that the more crews you run... some of your overhead percentage actually goes down. I know my overhead is extremely low... thanks to cheap, paid for trucks, paid for equipment, no rent payment, liability insurance. Of course, I have to estimate repair bills... but it isn't 1k a month.

Another thing that you did not say, is that on those $500 non-profitable days... if you don't work at all you will be losing that $500, right?

tthomass
04-16-2007, 11:50 PM
Right....like a winter time job, sometimes you may work to break even and keep busy. Profit may be minimal but you aren't at a loss.

JimLewis
04-17-2007, 03:10 AM
Well, I don't have the time to read the preceding responses to this thread. So I am just responding to the initial post:

In theory, yes, that's the right direction to be thinking. But in practice, it's really nothing like that simple formula. It's actually quite a lot more complex.

First, you list about 4 or 5 things that account for overhead. In reality, in my company at least, there are probably about 50 things to account for in our overhead. Workers comp. insurance, auto insurance, liability insurance, bond, city license, metro license, state license, landscape contractors board license, vehicle licensing, performance bond, utilities, cell phones, internet, marketing (many different types), website development and maintenance, website hosting, website promotion, uniforms, estimating materials, office supplies, office equipment, landscaping equipment, equipment maintenance, vehicle maintenance, purchasing new vehicles, shop and/or office rent, loss insurance, security, vehicle lettering, accountant fees, attorney fees, bookkeeper fees, continuing education (business seminars, trips), organizers, business cards, the list goes on and on and on........

All these things have to be factored in. If you forget to account for one of the above items, you either won't be able to do it, or you will do it and be losing money without knowing it.

To make matters more difficult, most of these things are not simple, fixed, monthly amounts. They vary wildly from one month to the next.

And even if you don't have some of these items (say a shop) currently, then by not factoring the cost of having that item into your rate, you're never going to be able to AFFORD that item. So if you're not currently budgeting the expense of a shop into your current rate, you'll never have the money to get a shop! Same with any given item.

The other killer to your simple formula is you assume that you'll be working 5 days each week, every single week, no matter what. The reality is different. Some weeks you only work 4 days, rather than 5. So on those weeks, you'd need to charge 5% more each day in order to compensate.

Your formula also doesn't account for down time and winter months as well. A lot of those items keep on going all year. So even if you aren't making much money in December or January, you still have to pay for a lot of stuff. If you were just budgeting to cover that stuff based on a 5-day work week, how are you going to pay for that same stuff when it's a 0-day work week? It's not like business expenses simply disappear during the winter. Well, maybe if you are a solo op. and work out of your own garage and have no employees and never drive your truck all winter. But for any real company, there are lots of expenses that continue all year long. You have to plan and prepare for those expenses and factor that down time into your hourly rate the rest of the year.

It's just not as simple as you make it out to be. I wish it were so. Man, do I wish it were so. But it's ever so much more complex than that.

Duekster
04-17-2007, 06:32 AM
all of the above it true. I put Equipment cost separately.

If I charge for everything in every job then I may cause me to lose a job.

Example, I don't put mower cost in a hardscape job.

nijory
04-17-2007, 06:25 PM
how did you come up with the $90? What does that consist of?

nijory
04-17-2007, 06:32 PM
how did you come up with the $90

tthomass
04-17-2007, 11:46 PM
Please read carefully.........this is ONLY a SIMPLE example. Stop trying to pick things apart. Yes there are many factors to overhead......

The $90 does not matter. It is what I happen to charge, on average, for regular mulch. There is not a set price.