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View Full Version : we will beat any bid offer


bohiaa
04-16-2007, 09:10 AM
wondering if this is a good thing to put in bid offers ?


what ya think

mow2nd
04-16-2007, 09:11 AM
MO..................unless u just wanna work for nothing

dcondon
04-16-2007, 09:13 AM
I would say it's a real quick to go out of business. That's not very professional or profitable.:hammerhead:

GreenN'Clean
04-16-2007, 10:16 AM
No!!!!! You will have the reputation as the cheap guy and everyone will want everything done for next to nothing and if you try to raise the price they will complain and drop you for the next cheaper guy....

GLLawns
04-16-2007, 10:17 AM
You are asking for a mess of problems if you try that type of advertising. Just my two cents

bohiaa
04-16-2007, 10:25 AM
ok thx. I bid on an appartment complex and I really want it... I was thinking about writting them a letter stating that we will match or beat any written offer.....

nobagger
04-16-2007, 10:33 AM
ok thx. I bid on an appartment complex and I really want it... I was thinking about writting them a letter stating that we will match or beat any written offer.....

bohiaa, I actually tried this years ago against all of the negative responses I got in here. Well all I can tell you is THEY WERE RIGHT! It scared away customer's I think,lol. I have learned throughout the years its not just the service you are selling, its you, your company etc. So my advise, bid it to get it but without the "beat any price" thing. Plus a lot of companies and customers dont want to be bothered calling you back asking you to go over the bid again so you can try to beat the price.

Vikings
04-16-2007, 01:13 PM
It works for Home Depot:)

Uranus
04-16-2007, 01:31 PM
:nono: You've been here for over a year and a half now. So why ask a newbie question?

But to answer your question, HELL NO!:nono:

bohiaa
04-16-2007, 01:40 PM
Tes I have however I moved and started a co here in new location and this bid is the 1st time I ever bidded on anything that big before. and I kind of want it.... and after a few days I thought my bid was a little high...

But I hear what yall are saying.....

Thanks everyone

johnnywill08
04-16-2007, 06:16 PM
you'd regret all year every time you worked there. i can always tell if i bid a job right by how good or bad i feel while working there. like "get me the hell outta here, i'm taking a beating".... besides what do you think they're going to do when you jack your bid next year??? be grateful for last year's discount? no, they'll tell you to screw. bid it to make an honest profit, otherwise 8 months of regret.

JB1
04-16-2007, 06:31 PM
go for it, but I aint playing that game.

DuraCutter
04-16-2007, 11:32 PM
It works for Home Depot:)

Yes, but retail is very different than cutting grass. For one, they'll give the price guarantee for the same model of whatever they're selling. Most times, stores have models built for them, so that negates many of their own products.

It's also easy to check the competition price for home depot. For lawncare, they can lie, make a fake quote etc.... :)

lawnpro724
04-16-2007, 11:36 PM
you may get jobs but you will go broke and does the term LOWBALLER mean anything to you?

Trinity Lawn Care, LLC
04-16-2007, 11:42 PM
Nah, I wouldn't go down that road. You are just asking to lose money on that one.

crawdad
04-17-2007, 08:25 AM
wondering if this is a good thing to put in bid offers ?


what ya think

It must be a good strategy, as I've noticed there's a different guy saying that in their ads, each year. I wonder what happened to last years "Lowest price" guy?

TNT LawnCare Inc.
04-17-2007, 09:27 AM
Not to mention you will get alot of pita customers,you act cheap your gonna get cheap customers most of the time.

ed2hess
04-17-2007, 06:33 PM
TG bids exactly like you are wanting to do....they say they will meet or beat any reasonable bid. One other big company said they would mow for 3% below the present amount. At certain times if we are looking at ensuring we are at max. load on a crew we will let the customer know that we will meet any bid from a major company. Many times we find that low bids have less cuts or charge more for items like flowers and mulch.

mattfromNY
04-17-2007, 06:43 PM
When I was selling retail (Motorcycles), we had a competitor that advertised 'We will beat any written price!', I wrote up several quotes WAY below cost and sent a few of my friends to him. Needless to say, my friends got GREAT deals on new bikes, and that dealer ate crow. All of my friends still came to us for service and all, and never went back to that dealership for anything. Just an example of what can happen (games people play) when you advertise that you will beat anyones price.
Dont be the cheapest. Just the best. and you will have a much better life.

ubirajara83
04-18-2007, 01:29 AM
I think if youre starting out its a good idea to get some customers in certain neighborhoods. After that their neighbors are going to see u there and u can charge them higher. As long as you are making your overhead in the beggining its worth it in my opinion, but everyone has their diff route

crawdad
04-18-2007, 08:19 AM
I think if youre starting out its a good idea to get some customers in certain neighborhoods. After that their neighbors are going to see u there and u can charge them higher. ...

No, the neighbors will expect the same low prices.

nobagger
04-18-2007, 09:05 AM
I think if youre starting out its a good idea to get some customers in certain neighborhoods. After that their neighbors are going to see u there and u can charge them higher. As long as you are making your overhead in the beggining its worth it in my opinion, but everyone has their diff route

I think this might cause you to loose any customers you might get in close proximity. Neighbor's talk (at least in my neighborhood) and I'm sure they would be discussing your services and prices. If you need to advertise a "neighborhood discount".

johnnywill08
04-18-2007, 10:44 AM
I think if youre starting out its a good idea to get some customers in certain neighborhoods. After that their neighbors are going to see u there and u can charge them higher. As long as you are making your overhead in the beggining its worth it in my opinion, but everyone has their diff route

i actually have had success with this strategy.... i've come in slightly low (not what would be considered lowballing or even working for cost) just to get a foothold in a really nice section. then i progressively bump that 1st customer up all the while i'm picking up new clients in the neighborhood.

as long as you don't really slash your price (ie mowing a $60 lawn for 35) you dont get burned. im talkin max $5 less/cut.... $120 less at the end of the year can be worth it to get some visibility in the nicer hoods.... imo

5yrs in the biz, tho, so i'm still very much in the growing process, lotta you guys are established and can give "take it or leave it" prices.. im mighty jealous, but not there yet.....

topsites
04-20-2007, 12:21 AM
I learned to be real careful watching what the big guys do, it's not fair to compare what Home Depot or any other multi-billion dollar mega-store national super corporation is doing...

For one, nobody owns Home Depot, hence why it's a corporation...
If Home Depot loses $1,000,000 today, it comes out of nobody's pocket.
Not entirely true, but it could be 6-12 months before employees realize the next raise was delayed, or prices went up.

In the case of small business, when you lose even 5 dollars, first you feel it, then you lose it, it comes straight out of your own pocket.
With a small company, it don't take 2 dollars 5 minutes to sink in lol.

One easy thing to remember here is: You're making choices that directly affect your income, in real time.
So, don't sell yourself out, it cheapens you.

johnnywill08
04-20-2007, 08:53 AM
I learned to be real careful watching what the big guys do, it's not fair to compare what Home Depot or any other multi-billion dollar mega-store national super corporation is doing...

For one, nobody owns Home Depot, hence why it's a corporation...
If Home Depot loses $1,000,000 today, it comes out of nobody's pocket.
Not entirely true, but it could be 6-12 months before employees realize the next raise was delayed, or prices went up.

In the case of small business, when you lose even 5 dollars, first you feel it, then you lose it, it comes straight out of your own pocket.
With a small company, it don't take 2 dollars 5 minutes to sink in lol.

One easy thing to remember here is: You're making choices that directly affect your income, in real time.
So, don't sell yourself out, it cheapens you.

all i was saying you'd only sacrifice the $5 if the hope of many more $$$ (because of this ie, getting a first foot into a neighborhood)...was realistic