PDA

View Full Version : Ohio lawn with yellow streaks


selaeration
04-16-2007, 10:20 AM
A customer sent me this photo. I fertilized about 2 weeks ago. Any Ideas from this picture? It has been very cold here after a very warm stretch

indyturf
04-16-2007, 10:54 AM
I have seen a few lawns like that too. its caused from the cold (winter) weather we had the last couple weeks.

turfsolutions
04-16-2007, 11:12 AM
Could it have been walked on in the morning when there was a bad frost on the ground? That would leave brown marks. Tough to say from the picture if it is foot prints.

RAlmaroad
04-16-2007, 11:35 AM
Calcium chloride from traffic slush? Any early liquid pre-em applications? Lots of variables.

upidstay
04-16-2007, 12:34 PM
Could be lots of things. I'd wait and see how it looks after the lawn has really gotten going. They could be foot prints from somebody walking on the frost, could be patches of different grasses coming out of dormancy later, literally dozens of possibilities.

teeca
04-16-2007, 06:59 PM
i'm with indyturf.. i have seen a few like that, the lawns with tall fescue mixed in are realy bad.

Puttinggreens
04-16-2007, 07:26 PM
I too believe it is just different species or varieties coming out of dormancy. If the customer is really concerned, pull out some individual plants and check to make sure the crown is alive.

americanlawn
04-16-2007, 08:21 PM
It is severe cold temperature injury on lush vegetation.
The grass was actively growing and very lush (juicy).
82 degrees - then 7 degree windchills = frost bite.
Same deal with many woody plants.

Tall fescue got hit hardest (the upper Midwest is it's northernmost growing range). Then rye, then Kentucky blue.

Lawns that were worst hit were the ones that got mowed before these nearly record cold temps arrived. Open cuts on the grass blades componded the damage.

I mow my own lawn, so here's what I did:
When I saw the long range forecast, I chose not to mow.
Instead, I mowed yesterday. I had to double cut it, but it's all green now. No "freezer burn".

Our land-grant university has been hit hard with phone calls regarding this "cosmetic" problem.

xpnd
04-17-2007, 12:44 AM
[QUOTE=americanlawn;1796840]It is severe cold temperature injury on lush vegetation.
The grass was actively growing and very lush (juicy).
82 degrees - then 7 degree windchills = frost bite.
Same deal with many woody plants.

Only mammals are affected by wind chill. A 35 degree night with a wind chill factor that makes it feel in the teens is still only 35 degrees to plants.

Runner
04-17-2007, 01:11 AM
HUH????? This is both correct AND incorrect. Mostly incorrect. Plants foll temperature, and soils are nt affected by temperature...only ambient temps. But plants themselves ARE affected by wind chills....VERY affected. In caes like this, foliage can be burned. This looks very much like the case, here. Much the same way chemical burn works, wind does essentially the same thing. If you have ever seen the damage up here that can happen to other types of plants, as well, you would know exactly what I'm talking about. We have a term up here for this called winter dessication. If you have ever seen nursery stock with whole sides of it's foliage (let alone smaller parts) taken off, you would know what is meat by this. Many times, evergreen types are susceptible to this when exposed to wide open areas that are facing the west and/or southwest. Some are even more fragile than others...for instance, Alberta spruce is VERY susceptible compared to thing like Norway Blue or Scotch. Cedar arbos are somewhat susceptible, too - especially when young and more tender.

RAlmaroad
04-17-2007, 08:03 AM
Runner: Would the wind burn have a wider area? Those small patterns indicate something else. Wind burn on the trees that you mention are usually just one side unless accompanied by a freeze, then everything turns brown. Not totally disagreeing with you, but I've been around a long time and seen lots of wind burn--even on myself. The small patterns are just out of joint with the patterns that I've seen. I can see a poorly fertilized area that greened up the grass in those area then burned--should that be the case I hope that it wasn't done by one of our guys. Anyway just thinking about it. Roy

RigglePLC
04-17-2007, 08:24 AM
Seleration,
how many years experience do you have? Surely you went out to examine the problem promptly. That is good customer service. Does the whole lawn look the same? Back yard, too? Is this a dry treatment with a spreader--or a liquid? What exact chemical was used? At what rates? What pressure? How much water per 1000 sqft? How many of your lawns look this way? What was temperature at time of application? Can you see the pattern of your treatment on other parts of the lawn? Was this a Chemlawn gun application? Or a flat fan applicator? Permagreen?

A malfunctioning spreader usually leaves a sprial pattern. A liquid burn leaves a pattern showing where the arm moved back and forth--and sometimes where it stopped and started near bushes.

somo1
04-17-2007, 08:52 AM
Go to Purdue University and check out there turftips, the brown streaks are wind burn, we had the same in my area. Temps went from 60-70s to below freezing into high 20s low 30s. Its caused by the lush grass juices from being recently mowed then a quick freeze. All the new leaves on the trees here are all black and dead, boxwoods are yellow. It was great for killing the dandelions and what crabgrass had germinated though.

Russ
04-17-2007, 08:53 AM
This remind ya of anything

http://www.agry.purdue.edu/turf/tips/2007/04_13cold.htm

bahamamills
04-17-2007, 10:00 AM
"Purdue University turftips" Great source..........

Runner
04-17-2007, 08:46 PM
Runner: Would the wind burn have a wider area? Those small patterns indicate something else. Wind burn on the trees that you mention are usually just one side unless accompanied by a freeze, then everything turns brown. Not totally disagreeing with you, but I've been around a long time and seen lots of wind burn--even on myself. The small patterns are just out of joint with the patterns that I've seen. I can see a poorly fertilized area that greened up the grass in those area then burned--should that be the case I hope that it wasn't done by one of our guys. Anyway just thinking about it. Roy

Yep. Here's what I am thinking. Normally, the grass would and SHOULD show signs of broader and smoother rashes. However, depending on how this was fertilized, like the spreader, the throw quality, etc., much of this grass looks like it took up fert in heavy streaks - typical of a cheap spreader or one that is throwing bad. It is too broad for clumping, though. This has left the heavy rashes that then burned from their moisture content due to the N.

sprayboy
04-17-2007, 09:24 PM
Russ,
Thanks for posting the Purdue link, I was going to do that myself.

I am seeing this everywhere, especially out in the country. I figured it was the cold weather also.

I seen a lawn today that I watched a guy mow on one of those cold days, wind chills in the teens and twenties. The lawn is all tire tracks throughout, looks really nice.

rshofcols
04-21-2007, 09:22 PM
that is a combination of foot traffic getting the mail and the first cut from the mower,you can see the circular patterns of the blades. I had about 10 yards that we cut when it was 83 and the next day it was 29. The pendi I put down had just started kicking in and the tips of the blades of grass could not take the stress. two weeks later they are coming back

causalitist
04-23-2007, 01:01 AM
[QUOTE=americanlawn;1796840]It is severe cold temperature injury on lush vegetation.
The grass was actively growing and very lush (juicy).
82 degrees - then 7 degree windchills = frost bite.
Same deal with many woody plants.

Only mammals are affected by wind chill. A 35 degree night with a wind chill factor that makes it feel in the teens is still only 35 degrees to plants.

correct. wind chill is the fact that more air molecules are coming in contact with the surface in question and therefore equalizing the temperature difference faster. Wind chill would matter only in the speed at which the grass cools. .. but the end temp is the same.

humans are different because we produce heat and are constantly fighting the temperature difference of the surrounding air.

10 degrees out, grass is at 10 degrees, lots of 10 degree air blowing on it makes no difference... unless the grass is not at 10 degrees, in which case it would get there faster.

10 degrees out, animal is at ~98 degrees, lots of 10 degree air blowing on it makes a big difference.


grass/plants are affected by wind.. but its just from evaporation, not coldness(think an untarped tree in your truck, 70 degrees out, going 50mph)