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View Full Version : How much water to dump in flower beds?


j_nolesfan
04-18-2007, 05:50 PM
Hello again and thanks for the advice I've gotten so far. I'm hoping to use my flower beds as a "dumping ground" to a degree to make up for the extra water I need to dispense on my spray head/bubbler zone. Is there a rule of thumb on the GPM per sq ft? One bed's about 8' X 10' and the other is about 10' X 20'. I was planning on having two or three bubblers (Hunter AFB's namely) in the 8' X 10' and five or six in the 10' X 20'. As it stands now, I need to dispense an additional 10-12 GPM. All other heads on this zone will be sprays with a minimum radius of 12' half circle at 1.3 GPM and several 15' quarter circles at 1 GPM. My operating pressure will be above 40 PSI, hopefully under 50 PSI. Specifically, the zone consists of the following sprays.

2 - 180 degree 12' sprays at about 1.3 GPM
4 - 90 degree 15' sprays at about 1 GPM
1 - 240 degree 12' spray at about 1.7 GPM
2 - 180 degree ~18' sprays at about 1.48 GPM
Total sprayer flow = 11.26 GPM

My target flow is a minimum of 19 GPM.
So, I need to dispense an additional 9-10 GPM in my two beds. I know that bubblers can flow up to 2 GPM but I don't want to flood my beds to the point that I'll need to add Koi, :laugh: One final note, the 10' X 20' bed slopes away from the house a little bit in case that matters.
Thanks in advance,
Jeff

Mike Leary
04-18-2007, 07:21 PM
Um, it's the end of the day out here on the coast & I mite have drank a few
Lawn Genie beers (Canadian version 20%) but IS THIS ALL ON ONE ZONE?
Or are you running zones in tandem...why do you need to eat 19gpm????
Am I missing something? Are you a contractor??????

Wet_Boots
04-18-2007, 07:39 PM
I think this is a well-water system with a need to match pump output, and the easy way out is to just install as many (standard, so you can replace them) sprays or bubblers as is needed to consume the water supply. No point in asking what a pro would do, since they'd have heavy-flow bubblers, or some other workaround the homeowner might not have access to.

Mike Leary
04-18-2007, 07:51 PM
I think this is a well-water system with a need to match pump output, and the easy way out is to just install as many (standard, so you can replace them) sprays or bubblers as is needed to consume the water supply. No point in asking what a pro would do, since they'd have heavy-flow bubblers, or some other workaround the homeowner might not have access to.

Lovely..except the precipition rates are screwed up. the application is
different.....the plants will flood/stress. Other than that, great suggestion!

Wet_Boots
04-18-2007, 08:07 PM
Florida sand can soak up a lot of overwatering, so I think the homeowner can go nuts on this. Adjust the controller time, obviously.

j_nolesfan
04-18-2007, 10:16 PM
Um, it's the end of the day out here on the coast & I mite have drank a few
Lawn Genie beers (Canadian version 20%) but IS THIS ALL ON ONE ZONE?
Or are you running zones in tandem...why do you need to eat 19gpm????
Am I missing something? Are you a contractor??????

Yes, it's a well system and no I'm not a contractor but I have access to anything a contractor could need via an irrigation distributor who carries RainBird and Hunter as well as a few other brands. The problem I can't solve in running in tandem is that I'd have to have the sprays run a shorter time than the rotors AND the 11 GPM would mean that I could only run three or four heads at that time. Then, I'd have to switch from the sprays to another rotor based zone and keep those other three heads still running. So yeah, just dumping the water is a large band aid but it keeps the sore spot in one place instead of two places.
Another option might be to switch to three spray heads across the width of my side yard in place of where I would have put two rotors. I say this because I don't think (correct me here) that it's a good idea to use sprayers to cover a 20' radius (20' between my house and the fence). If I switched to three across, I could use three sprays at about 7' each for a more efficient (?) coverage?

Yeah Mike, I'm an idiot when it comes to irrigation but I'm just looking for answers, not for someone to rub it in my face. So kindly have another "Canadian Lawn Genie" :drinkup: and move on to the next thread if you wanna talk down to me.

Peace,
Jeff

j_nolesfan
04-18-2007, 10:20 PM
Wet Boots,
I'm in Florida but Pensacola might as well be in Alabama. I've got potter's clay in my yard so yeah, if I want to just dump too much water in my level bed, I'd probably need to dig out some of the current soil and drop in some sand. That's why I laid my problem out to the extent that I did, so maybe I could get some opinions on what's too much water in a bed and maybe food for thought on what might make more sense. Would it be a good idea to try and bridge a 20' gap with a spray head? I get the impression that there would be a lot of evaporation in such a large radius of spray as opposed to a curtain stream from a rotor.
Thanks,
Jeff

gusbuster
04-18-2007, 10:33 PM
Forget gpm for a moment, What kind of plants are going to be in the plant bed? Are the plants tolerant from being watered(sprayed) from above or are the plants such as roses that only like to be water at the bottom.

Before trying to figure out your g.p.m. problem, it would help to know what kind of plants you'll be using.

Mike Leary
04-18-2007, 11:21 PM
Forget gpm for a moment, What kind of plants are going to be in the plant bed? Are the plants tolerant from being watered(sprayed) from above or are the plants such as roses that only like to be water at the bottom.

Before trying to figure out your g.p.m. problem, it would help to know what kind of plants you'll be using.

The point I was trying to make was plant/zone is the bottom line: gpm is
b.s , so is psi...making the plants happy I thought was our gig. Moisture
meters should be part of everybody's field kit. Roses are a problem w/spray,
6" pops work well...where the roses are planted affects their health.

PurpHaze
04-19-2007, 12:44 AM
Forget gpm for a moment, What kind of plants are going to be in the plant bed? Are the plants tolerant from being watered(sprayed) from above or are the plants such as roses that only like to be water at the bottom.

Before trying to figure out your g.p.m. problem, it would help to know what kind of plants you'll be using.

How about hydrilla? After all... he WILL end up with a swamp in those beds. May as well join other parts of Florida that are already clogged up with this ungodly water weed.:laugh:

j_nolesfan
04-19-2007, 09:48 AM
Man, I really sparked a debate here. Did anyone see my other option? Putting more sprays out in the side yard? Should I just put a high GPM rotor at the border of this zone and throw the water into the area where my other rotors are? Yes, poor design, I know. I'm looking to fix this thing by at the most borrowing heads from the neighboring zone and working toward a balanced output across all zones. Has anyone suggested a solution? IMO, it's all been about the fact that flooding my beds is a bad idea.
The plants in my bed will be a border of a tropical verigated tall grass (not sure of the name) and some Nandina and Indian Hawthorne. There's another shrub on the larger bed that's completely purple. It tends to grow out a little more than up. I can't remember the name of it either. So, it's shrubs, yes they will accept sprays. My original intent was to avoid spraying the brick walls of my house and the sidewalks that border the beds in case there's excessive iron in the water. I hate those ugly shields. With it being shrubs, that's probably all the more reason not to flood the beds too much (you see, I am learning something here).

Onto my option for dispensing more water elsewhere instead of in the beds. I have a side yard that currently is planned for rotors. This side yard is "trapezoidal" where it's 15' across on one end and expands out to a total of about 30' at the other end. About mid way down the side yard, I was going to put two short range rotors (Rainbird 3500). At this point, the distance between the house and the fence is about 22'. The pattern will be a 180 degree and the radius will obviously be about 22'. I would like to abandon the idea of putting rotors there in favor of sprays to increase the GPM of my spray zone. It won't be a problem for me to increase my GPM on a couple of rotors out in the yard where there's more sunlight without totally screwing up my precip rate. My question is this, if I wanted to put sprays in that 22' space, would it be preferable to put three sprays across it with two 180's throwing about 7' each and a 360 in the middle throwing 7', or one on either side throwing 22' at 180 degrees?
Thanks again,
Jeff

Wet_Boots
04-19-2007, 10:04 AM
Why not supply a scale drawing of the zone(s) involved? All I knew was that there were beds and bubblers. This is not really something you want to make a 'word problem' of.

j_nolesfan
04-19-2007, 01:02 PM
Ok, I'm not a draftsman and this isn't graph paper. I've provided a few scale references throughout. The fence on the left side is 30'. The fence on the right is about 15'. I actually had to use Photoshop to cut the house out of the drawing and move/rotate it into a more accurate position so it was a real PITA. I didn't want to get into shading radius' on here and the like. It could get messy really quick. The zones are color coded with the exception of the fact that the sprayers and bubblers are on their own leg, albeit spread out. I'm using 3/8" ID funny pipe on 3/4" Toro screw in elbows at the pipe so I can easily fine tune the position of a head by lengthening or shortening a piece of funny pipe and placing the head in a new spot. ALL valves are located at the tank which is situated 10' from the well. All valves are 1" angle valves feeding into 1.5" mains. After the first "T", the lines go down to 1". The last two heads on each leg are connected with 3/4". I can output 30 GPM @ 30 PSI. (additional history here: http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=180386&page=2)

Here's the picture. I hope it speaks for itself for the most part.
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/199/465187803_834178c1ca_b.jpg

I highlighted the two Rainbird 3500's on the right side. If I move those into the spray zone, I'll pick up GPM and reduce the number of heads in the dark yellow area. This would allow me to take one head from the green zone and put it on the dark yellow. With that, I think my GPM should balance out. These are all operating between 40 and 50 PSI. I've laid pipe in the front yard with the intention of being able to move heads to sprays or vice versa. I have trenches in the back yard but no pipe so I can make adjustments as needed. I'm not terribly concerned about a dry spot in my back yard. If I can keep all of it reasonably watered, mother nature will probably take care of the rest (live or die), God willing.
Thanks again,
Jeff

j_nolesfan
04-19-2007, 01:05 PM
One more note, the yard goes a little farther out toward the street. They pretty much left out the right of way. The electrical box, for example is in the grass and there's about 8' between it and the curb. I may put a 90 degree spray at the corner of the driveway and curb on the left side of the driveway. That won't be fun because I'll have to manually dig across all of my service lines yet again.

Wet_Boots
04-19-2007, 01:20 PM
Bring us up to speed on how many zones there are. I could infer three or four from the diagram.

j_nolesfan
04-19-2007, 02:31 PM
Oops, I should have mentioned that. The white space is actually two zones that overlap. The sprays and bubblers are on one zone and the rotors on another. The other two are pretty obvious although I'm prepared to make the two (green and yellow) zones into three if I have to. Drawing pipe runs could get messy. Hopefully, it will suffice to say that I attempted to make something similar to a goal post pattern for each zone where it runs a 1.5" main to a T where it branches out in 1" and covers half of the total heads in each direction. Of course, there are cases where that rule is broken in the back yard and with the sprays as well.
Thanks again,
Jeff

Wet_Boots
04-19-2007, 03:05 PM
Okay, if you have a mix of rotors and sprays and bubblers, the first thing to do is oversize the rotor nozzles, so they water at a rate to match the sprays.

j_nolesfan
04-19-2007, 03:09 PM
Actually, the rotors and sprays are on separate zones. I didn't want to tangle with trying to match precip rates between rotors and sprays.

Mike Leary
04-19-2007, 03:35 PM
I apologize for going the wrong way with your question, had quite the afternoon yesterday, but you can now see how vauge your original post was.

j_nolesfan
04-19-2007, 03:39 PM
Apology accepted. I'm a little frazzled as well between trying to figure out this project and balancing everything else I've got going on. I suppose I want all the answers yesterday just like everyone else, :laugh: 20% beer? Sounds almost like carbonated rum. :canadaflag:
Jeff

Wet_Boots
04-19-2007, 03:41 PM
Complete the picture then. Zone it out. Color in the areas, or put zone numbers by the heads. It's too easy to mis-guess what's going on here.

Mike Leary
04-19-2007, 05:14 PM
Boots...maybe when I have half the posts you guys have, I'll have more patience. No Lawn Genie for Mikie today.

Wet_Boots
04-19-2007, 08:31 PM
Re-reading this all, and looking over the plan, I'm wondering if it isn't possible to run this zone at a higher pump pressure, and just throttle down the pressure at the valve, if needed. I don't really see room for 8 gpm in the described beds. 2 or 3 gpm might be more like it.

There's some room to slide the numbers around. Give a spray head more pressure, and the gpm increases, without much more distance. that 11+ gpm at 30 psi nozzle pressure will be closer to 15 gpm at 50 psi.

PurpHaze
04-19-2007, 10:41 PM
Personally I don't like the idea of trying to balance a residential system GPM with the pump just to save it. There has to be an inexpensive pump solution available from some of the pump guys on the forum.

PurpHaze
04-19-2007, 10:47 PM
Here's the picture. I hope it speaks for itself for the most part.

Dang... Tweak the one corner of the fence a little and it looks a lot like Ed G's property. :laugh:

Wet_Boots
04-19-2007, 10:52 PM
Personally I don't like the idea of trying to balance a residential system GPM with the pump just to save it.Just to save it? This isn't rocket science here. :hammerhead: One can actually choose nozzle sizes, and match zones to supply. The higher gpm of popup nozzles at higher pressures might not be visible in some mfr data, but it's there. This guy's probably just a few gpm of flower bed watering from a match.

PurpHaze
04-19-2007, 11:56 PM
Then design his system for him. :p

I personally wouldn't touch it with what has been presented here. :)

Remote Pigtails
04-20-2007, 12:23 AM
The point I was trying to make was plant/zone is the bottom line: gpm is
b.s , so is psi...making the plants happy I thought was our gig. Moisture
meters should be part of everybody's field kit. Roses are a problem w/spray,
6" pops work well...where the roses are planted affects their health.

Mike you sound like you got an education in horticulture. Something I rarely run into with Dallas irrigators. Recommend a good moisture meter to me.

PurpHaze
04-20-2007, 12:33 AM
I'm not Mike... but... unless they've gotten any better at doing their jobs I've found soil moisture potentiometers to be somewhat lacking. :)

I remember one LA designing an area for one school with potentiometers and they hired a contractor to put it all in. Within two years the turf and most of the plantings were dead. The potentiometer controller was ripped out, a standard controller put in and everyone's been happy since. :laugh:

Remote Pigtails
04-20-2007, 12:37 AM
I was thinking he had some kind of probe that he took from job to job.

Rotor_Tool
04-20-2007, 12:59 AM
Why not put rotary nozzles on the sprays and run the "spray" zone that now has the same precip rate as the rotor zone together with the rotor zone? Given that the precip rates will be very similar, your run-times can match and possibly max out the hydraulics of the pump.

j_nolesfan
04-20-2007, 10:08 AM
I apologize if this is a double post. I encountered an error and it appears my post was lost.

Rotor, are you referring to the Rainbird rotor spray heads? I thought those had issues? If not, let me know what you're referring to. It could solve lots of problems for me, if they're not too expensive.

Here's another pic with my zones more clearly defined.
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/212/466068826_0049e63dbc_b.jpg

Wet_Boots
04-20-2007, 10:45 AM
My operating pressure will be above 40 PSI, hopefully under 50 PSIWhy under 50 psi? Bonus points? Brand name popup sprays are rated for 75 psi, even if you'll never give them that much pressure
My target flow is a minimum of 19 GPM.
So, I need to dispense an additional 9-10 GPM in my two beds.No you don't. Your 'target flow' is irrelevant. The true target is for the pump to run continuously, at whatever safe pressure creates a balance. The rating of the pressure tank is what will limit any adjusting of the pressure switch

j_nolesfan
04-20-2007, 11:59 AM
Why under 50 psi? Bonus points? Brand name popup sprays are rated for 75 psi, even if you'll never give them that much pressure

You're right, but I thought some spray heads had issues with higher pressures. Plus, it throws my nozzle performance charts out the window and becomes trial and error when most spray nozzles are rated at <=30 PSI so the main reason is that it complicates my design efforts.

No you don't. Your 'target flow' is irrelevant. The true target is for the pump to run continuously, at whatever safe pressure creates a balance. The rating of the pressure tank is what will limit any adjusting of the pressure switch

Right again but if I go below 19 GPM, my pump will catch up with the flow rate and shut down. I'll be running off the tank at that point. I'm not sure how to deal with that. It's already set to shut the pump off in the 85 PSI range and it's rated for 100 PSI. Raise the cut-off to max? Could I actually run a zone at 10-11 GPM and not do any harm to my pump and still not cycle it? If the answer's yes, I'm very happy to hear that. My problem is solved. When I first started my queries on this site, I was given the following advice by LCPullman:

Originally Posted by j_nolesfan
Ok, getting as close as I could to the wet method, here are a few measurements.

It just so happens that my current setup is almost identical to what Jess Stryker describes as his wet method. I have a 1.25" pipe coming from my tank that has the pressure guage in it. The guage is about a foot from the tank and the ball valve is about a foot from the pressure guage.

First, let me say that my pump cycles off when the pressure reaches about 85 PSI. I can maintain several pressures up to a little over 70 PSI without the pump seeming to catch up and shut down (for at least five minutes at each level suggesting that it's not going to catch up or the pressure would have increased, right?). My 5 gal bucket is just a little over 5 gals, more like 5.2 gals.

At 72 PSI, I fill the bucket in 16 seconds. According to my scale, that's about 18.75 GPM (19 GPM is safe considering the fact that it's over 5 gals).

At 50 PSI, it takes 13 seconds, 23+ GPM

At 30 PSI, it takes just over 10 seconds, about 30 GPM considering

It seems I can maintain any of these flows at their respective PSI levels without cycling the pump. If I get close to 75+ PSI, the pump seems to catch up and shut down quickly.

Does this help at all?
Regards,
Jeff

From LCPullman:
Ok, you probably should aim for around 60 to 50 psi which would put you around 20-23 gpm. At this point, you need to make sure you don't go under 19gpm, because that is where you can really wreck your pump (by cycling it). So, you should probably aim for around 22 gpm per zone.

The pressure tank on your system will work to maintain pressure for normal house usage, but doesn't help alot with the quantity of water you are dealing with.

The tutorials have alot more basic info about design of your system, here's the index page http://www.irrigationtutorials.com/sprinkler00.htm

Thanks again,

Jeff

j_nolesfan
04-20-2007, 12:03 PM
Another question, these beds in the front of my house are shrubs with the closest thing to a flower being a Nandina bush or two. Should I attempt to give up the GPM they were dispensing altogether and not water them at all? It will cost me at least 6-7 GPM (or save me depending on how you look at it). If I should at least water them, would the flood bubblers at a low setting or a multi stream bubbler be better?
Thanks again,
Jeff

Wet_Boots
04-20-2007, 12:31 PM
I was guessing a lower pressure switch setting from the numbers you were supplying. Except for nozzle fogging at really high pressures, you should be able to add some sprinklers for the flowerbeds, and get to your 19 gpm, since the existing popups will be using around 15 gpm.

If you didn't have any beds to place extra sprays, you'd be obliged to rework your design to get what a pro would have achieved in the first place. Remove a nearby rotor, and add popup sprays to cover the area. Then re-nozzle the rotor zone, if needed.

j_nolesfan
04-20-2007, 04:41 PM
If you didn't have any beds to place extra sprays, you'd be obliged to rework your design to get what a pro would have achieved in the first place. Remove a nearby rotor, and add popup sprays to cover the area. Then re-nozzle the rotor zone, if needed.

Well, the only thing that's currently in the ground so far is the blue zone (1 and 2). It woudn't take much for me to pick up the two "Move these two?" purple coded heads and replace them with sprays but that's still only a few GPM at best. I also still may add a single spray near the electric box as they call it on the left side of my driveway at the curb. I guess I'm just leary about spraying a power box since it could possibly (possibly?) invite a power surge through my piping and into my pump, house wiring, etc.
Jeff

j_nolesfan
04-20-2007, 04:42 PM
Also, what about those rotor sprayers from Rainbird? Are they reliable yet?

Wet_Boots
04-20-2007, 05:09 PM
Use as many sprays (and flowerbed bubblers/whatever) as you desire, to get the operating characteristics you're looking for. Then do the rest. Rotor nozzles can be changed to increase or decrease flow, but popup nozzles don't work that way.

Mike Leary
04-20-2007, 06:20 PM
Also, what about those rotor sprayers from Rainbird? Are they reliable yet?

Are you talking about the 5000 series or the 3500 or, or?

Wet_Boots
04-20-2007, 06:36 PM
Rainbird Rotators (or whatever they call them) I think.

Mike Leary
04-20-2007, 07:04 PM
Rainbird Rotators (or whatever they call them) I think.

Stick with the gal that brought you......the MP Rotators, made by Walla Walla
sprinkler co. here in Washington state...are tried & trusted. I've heard
different comments about the Rain-Bird (hell, they could be MPs under
license) but havn't tried them & don't intend to. So there. Getting to be
Lawn Genie time out here on the coast, anyone join me?

Dirty Water
04-20-2007, 07:14 PM
Rainbird calls them "Rotary Nozzles". They are not MP Rotators under license, as they don't share the same VAN style design. The rainbird nozzles are fixed pattern.

Also, Rainbird rolled these out and then recalled them quickly last year. Lets hope they have the kinks out by now.

Wet_Boots
04-20-2007, 07:16 PM
Yanks - Red Sox weekend series starts tonight. Big doings on tap. Me for some red wine and unsmoked lamb chops.

j_nolesfan
04-20-2007, 07:16 PM
Are you talking about the 5000 series or the 3500 or, or?

Actually, I'm refering to the rotary nozzles:
http://www.rainbird.com/landscape/products/rotarynozzles/rotarynozzles.htm

I don't know if Tieco sells Walla Walla products. That's from the upper left coast isn't it? :laugh:

Mike Leary
04-20-2007, 07:41 PM
I don't know if Tieco sells Walla Walla products. That's from the upper left coast isn't it? :laugh:

Ho ho, we're used to it...if you buy direct...a case of Walla Walla sweet onions & a six pak of Lawn Genie comes with the Rotators!:waving:

Remote Pigtails
04-21-2007, 12:58 AM
Stick with the gal that brought you......the MP Rotators, made by Walla Walla
sprinkler co. here in Washington state...are tried & trusted. I've heard
different comments about the Rain-Bird (hell, they could be MPs under
license) but havn't tried them & don't intend to. So there. Getting to be
Lawn Genie time out here on the coast, anyone join me?

Mike I think you should try the RB rotators. It won't kill you. I've put a lot of time into both and cannot convince myself the Walla walla wall of water are better.

Remote Pigtails
04-21-2007, 01:01 AM
Yanks - Red Sox weekend series starts tonight. Big doings on tap. Me for some red wine and unsmoked lamb chops.

Yanks are going to have to get some starting pitching boots. They remind me of the Ranger teams from the 90's.

Rotor_Tool
04-21-2007, 04:43 PM
I apologize if this is a double post. I encountered an error and it appears my post was lost.

Rotor, are you referring to the Rainbird rotor spray heads? I thought those had issues? If not, let me know what you're referring to. It could solve lots of problems for me, if they're not too expensive.

Here's another pic with my zones more clearly defined.
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/212/466068826_0049e63dbc_b.jpg

They are not "rotor spray heads", they are a rotary nozzle that attaches to a spray head. The product is available in fixed arc patterns. If you use the MPR nozzles made for the 5000 rotors, the precip rates are identical to Rotary Nozzles allowing "sprays" (bodies) and rotors to mixed on the same zone as run-times can be the same. There were issues with the initial design related to winterization only. According to my Rain Bird rep, the problem was never identified in the field, only through internal testing. The product was designed and is manufactured entirely by Rain Bird. As far as the MP Rotator is concerned, this product was taken from early Rain Bird designs by an ex-Rain Bird employee.

You can continue to run with that gal that brought you to the dance, but don't look under her skirt, you might get a surprise!!

j_nolesfan
04-21-2007, 07:08 PM
You can continue to run with that gal that brought you to the dance, but don't look under her skirt, you might get a surprise!!
That, my friend is what we call an "overshare".

Now for yet another wrinkle. If I decide to go with the rotary nozzles for my sprayers, I'm going to do it for every head. All red dots in the layout will become rotary headed sprayers. That brings me to the next point, and I still haven't gotten an answers since my first post in this thread, how much water is sufficient on a square footage basis in a sandy clay type soil for shrubery? I ask because I still want to water the beds a little bit. In my experience, when hawthorne and nandina get regular water, they grow much faster which allows (or necessitates) more trimming. The reason I like more trimming is because the bush tends to fill out quicker, allowing me to get it to what I desire as its final shape faster. Yes, wetting the leaves is probably a bad idea but a few strategically placed stream bubblers or even just flood bubblers should get the soil wet without soaking the shrubs. I just don't know how much is enough.

Thanks again,
Jeff

P.S. - Yanks? Red Sox? I thought he Revolutionary War was over? There's a NASCAR race on tonight in Phoenix though :cool2:

PurpHaze
04-21-2007, 10:20 PM
Boots needs some Lawn Genie beer to drown his sorrows. Red Sox lead the weekend series 2-0. :laugh:

PurpHaze
04-21-2007, 10:26 PM
You're right, but I thought some spray heads had issues with higher pressures.

At high pressures a spray nozzle can "mist out" which causes a drastic change to precipitation rates, makes the droplets more susceptable to wind, etc. but it all depends on how high it is. If your valve has a flow control on it then you can adjust it down and it will lower your overall zone pressure bringing the spray heads into optimum PSI range for their best performance. Also, most major manufacturers have sprinklers that are a "step up" and contain devices such as pressure compensators that will keep the sprinkler nozzle at a fixed PSI. You'll pay more for them but then again... you get what you pay for. :)

PurpHaze
04-21-2007, 10:40 PM
Another question, these beds in the front of my house are shrubs with the closest thing to a flower being a Nandina bush or two. Should I attempt to give up the GPM they were dispensing altogether and not water them at all? It will cost me at least 6-7 GPM (or save me depending on how you look at it). If I should at least water them, would the flood bubblers at a low setting or a multi stream bubbler be better?

All Nandina domestica varieties grow best with regular watering but can withstand periods of drought. Stressed plants are more susceptible to scale and wooly aphids that can cause quite a mess as well as look terrible. My "heavenly bamboo" is watered by a drip system.

Wet_Boots
04-22-2007, 02:20 PM
That brings me to the next point, and I still haven't gotten an answers since my first post in this thread, how much water is sufficient on a square footage basis in a sandy clay type soil for shrubery? I just don't know how much is enough.Your local Florida Cooperative Extension office, or whatever they're calling it these days, are the people to ask about watering requirements. They know your weather and soils and plants. Let them know you're watering lawngrass at the same time. Apply their information to your design work.