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PurpHaze
04-21-2007, 08:37 PM
Had this one yesterday. Site custodian came into work and discovered a parking lot under water from a 2" main line break. After the tee the main dives under the asphalt parking area to a couple of valves out on an island by the street. Between the diving of the main and the pressure from the conduit above this line never stood a chance.

bobw
04-23-2007, 10:54 AM
nice work

I find it very interesting how often you end up using an elbow to change vertical position on lines. It would seem that all of your original subcontractors were very poor at maintaining line depth consistently. I swear to god that I'd go ballistic if I had to face these sorts of quality issues so frequently.

Critical Care
04-23-2007, 12:18 PM
Not a whole lot of room left for that 90. How are you able to get by with using only a coupler on your reconnect? That 2" sched 40 doesn't flex that much does it?

Dirty Water
04-23-2007, 07:43 PM
That looks like 3" class pipe to me, when looking at the 1.25" conduit next to it.

And yes, you can flex that into a 90 no problem.

PurpHaze
04-23-2007, 09:44 PM
nice work

I find it very interesting how often you end up using an elbow to change vertical position on lines. It would seem that all of your original subcontractors were very poor at maintaining line depth consistently. I swear to god that I'd go ballistic if I had to face these sorts of quality issues so frequently.

I've followed behind this particular contractor on MANY occasions... almost feel like I should be on their payrool. At one site we needed to have an old galvanized 2" QCV line (that supplied a small system in the kindergarten area) connected to the new 3" PVC main line they were installing as part of the contract. I actually had to go out and do the work because they didn't have anyone that knew how to connect PVC to galvanized. Sheesh! :dizzy:

PurpHaze
04-23-2007, 09:55 PM
Not a whole lot of room left for that 90. How are you able to get by with using only a coupler on your reconnect? That 2" sched 40 doesn't flex that much does it?

Actually... there was plenty of flex room. On 2" PVC pipe you really only need about 2" of flex to perform magic tricks. :)

One of my favorite answers when approached by the boss on something really off the wall: "I can only perform magic and you're looking for a miracle here. I don't feel like I'm the right guy for the job. Better check at the church down the street." :laugh:

PurpHaze
04-23-2007, 09:59 PM
That looks like 3" class pipe to me, when looking at the 1.25" conduit next to it.

Uh, Jon??? You've only been away from the field for a very short time. Take a look at the original post. :laugh:

Site custodian came into work and discovered a parking lot under water from a 2" main line break.

The main lines are 2" SCH 40 and the conduit is a pair of 1" lines. :)

Dirty Water
04-23-2007, 10:14 PM
Uh, Jon??? You've only been away from the field for a very short time. Take a look at the original post. :laugh:



The main lines are 2" SCH 40 and the conduit is a pair of 1" lines. :)

Yeah, I step out of the mud for a few months and I forgot how to read.

PurpHaze
04-23-2007, 10:18 PM
It's a real biatch, isn't it? But your fingernails are a lot cleaner now. :)

Critical Care
04-23-2007, 10:59 PM
Well... I'll probably never have a chance to flex and play with 2" pvc. I'm too stinking busy digging up and replacing Marlex - still.

PurpHaze
04-23-2007, 11:01 PM
Guess by now you'll never vacation in Taiwan? :laugh:

Dirty Water
04-23-2007, 11:09 PM
I've actually flexed 4" 90's together. I've never had the chance to do 6", but given enough exposed pipe, and either some machine assistant from an excavator bucket, or a rubbet mallet, I bet it could be done.

On that note, I watched a operator laying 12" ditch pipe flex a gasket joint 90 in using a fullsize excavator. You don't need new techniques, you just need a bigger hammer.

PurpHaze
04-23-2007, 11:12 PM
Bigger trench, longer exposed pipe and bigger pry bar = flexible. :)

PurpHaze
04-23-2007, 11:25 PM
On a slightly different note: Regardless how long a main line has been in the ground the water will work its way along the trench line making the soil softer. We've often been able to tunnel back a couple of feet along the main with a trenching shovel for extra flexing space without having to dig the hole bigger.

Any flex magic only requires that the pipe be flexed enough that the protruding part of the tee/90/cross, etc. fitting clears the pipe at perpendicular angle for glueing. You only have to measure the inner socket depth of the fitting and add just a little to see if you have enough flex. On tricky larger pipe we will pre-flex to ensure that the fitting will go on.

Another hint is to never flex the pipe on the repaired side of the pipe (in my case, the couplings) or you may break the newly cemented solvent weld. We always flex behind the point of repair to make sure nothing bad happens.

KCLandscape
04-23-2007, 11:38 PM
Stevie Ray Purp HAZE.......
Excellent example...
Been there and accomplished...

Dirty Water
04-23-2007, 11:42 PM
Another hint is to never flex the pipe on the repaired side of the pipe (in my case, the couplings) or you may break the newly cemented solvent weld. We always flex behind the point of repair to make sure nothing bad happens.


Sometimes when repairing a tee, you don't have that option due to close proximity of other fittings etc. I'll flex a newly cemented joint without much worries as long as I was the one who did it.

KCLandscape
04-23-2007, 11:48 PM
So what do you do, lift the tee?

Dirty Water
04-23-2007, 11:51 PM
So what do you do, lift the tee?

When repairing a tee, I cut the tee out, and then use couplings on two sides to extend the pipe back to proper length. You then need to flex one of those to slip the tee on.

Then you either double 90 on the third side like Hayes did if your lucky, or install a repair fitting of some sort.

bicmudpuppy
04-24-2007, 07:33 AM
Sometimes when repairing a tee, you don't have that option due to close proximity of other fittings etc. I'll flex a newly cemented joint without much worries as long as I was the one who did it.


Jon, those office fumes are getting to you. You can flex where the glue is, just don't let the fitting that you glued flex. Pull from "behind"the coupling. Be as nice to the new fittings as you possibly can. Remember, Murphy is the only guy putting in more hours than an irrigator!

PurpHaze
04-24-2007, 08:20 AM
When repairing a tee, I cut the tee out, and then use couplings on two sides to extend the pipe back to proper length. You then need to flex one of those to slip the tee on.

If presented with two different pipe sizes I always try and flex the smaller pipe since it will have more give. However, there are times when this is not desirable, i.e. the ground is harder in the direction of the smaller pipe versus the larger pipe.

Then you either double 90 on the third side like Hayes did if your lucky, or install a repair fitting of some sort.

Exactly! The third picture shows the natural level of the pipe after cutting the tee. Since the "left" side remained at a constant level to the top pipe that's where the tee would go, especially since I already knew the "right" pipe had to go under the two conduits. It dropped down into a natural level where it's side would easily accept a close 90/90 after the tee.

Had all the piping been the same level and I hadn't needed to get under the conduit then a compression coupling would of been used to make the final connection on the "right" side of the tee.

PurpHaze
04-24-2007, 08:21 AM
Jon, those office fumes are getting to you. You can flex where the glue is, just don't let the fitting that you glued flex. Pull from "behind"the coupling. Be as nice to the new fittings as you possibly can. Remember, Murphy is the only guy putting in more hours than an irrigator!

You said it much better than I did Bryan. :clapping: