PDA

View Full Version : No overspray allowed


Dirty Water
04-25-2007, 07:01 PM
Alright Pro's,

How would you pull this off without overspray? This is a system I'm doing in the next month to satisfy my cravings for glue fumes.

POC is in the corner by the walkway and the landscape bed. I'm thinking two spray zones, and one drip. POC is a 1/2" copper stubout from inside the house, so no more than 5-8 gpm.

Wet_Boots
04-25-2007, 07:13 PM
Toro makes a 2x6 strip spray nozzle. Go nuts.

CAPT Stream Rotar
04-25-2007, 07:18 PM
4X28 nossle.....low water usage...great results

Mike Leary
04-25-2007, 07:46 PM
4X28 nossle.....low water usage...great results

That'll work great until the plants are installed. I'm thinking , Jon. M

CAPT Stream Rotar
04-25-2007, 07:47 PM
they must be big plants.....

stream sprays?

Ground Master
04-25-2007, 07:54 PM
No overspray?........Netafim of course

Mike Leary
04-25-2007, 07:57 PM
Alright Pro's,

How would you pull this off without overspray? This is a system I'm doing in the next month to satisfy my cravings for glue fumes.

POC is in the corner by the walkway and the landscape bed. I'm thinking two spray zones, and one drip. POC is a 1/2" copper stubout from inside the house, so no more than 5-8 gpm.

Don't forget the anti-dote for glue fumes. Weather-Matic makes the 5503
brass series, dialed down a tad & rear load on the narrow area should do it.
I would stub-out for copper risers in the center as plants mature & put rear
load risers against the back in the larger area. 5' centers rule.Drip bites.

CAPT Stream Rotar
04-25-2007, 07:57 PM
also try those micro misters.

great root watering.....we tried them for the first time last year....
not bad..just a thought

PurpHaze
04-25-2007, 11:55 PM
OK, Jon... I'll ask the obvious before even recommending a sprinkler. Just what the hell is going into the green zones on your plan? Planters, types of plants, turf, etc. It DOES make a big difference. :)

Dirty Water
04-26-2007, 12:55 AM
Its pre-existing turf.

bicmudpuppy
04-26-2007, 06:27 AM
If zero overspray is the real objective, then another vote for netafim. I've been doing a lot of research into netafim of late for another possible project, and I really like what I'm seeing. Something that small, you could hand slice a double row into the narrow areas. And I would hand slice the 8x10 unless you can get a plow for free. One battery operated valve and be done. Plenty of room to do it all on one zone. If the brown is beds, you could do them in a seperate zone. 360' of netafim in the 1.0 l/h on 18" centers runs just over 1gpm. I count just over 120' of tube to do the green area. You could slice that in with a good sharp square spade in a couple of hours. One draw back.........Netafim isn't going to give you much opp to smell any fumes :)

PurpHaze
04-26-2007, 07:55 AM
Its pre-existing turf.

Put pavers by the hot tub and sprays or MPR1000s on the right side. If they expect absolutely no overspray then... good luck. :)

Wet_Boots
04-26-2007, 08:14 AM
I'm saddened by what seems to be a distinct lack of enthusiasm for Toro's 2x6 side strip nozzles. :p

PurpHaze
04-26-2007, 08:21 AM
I'm saddened by what seems to be a distinct lack of enthusiasm for Toro's 2x6 side strip nozzles. :p

Can't guarantee that the spray won't drift? :)

Wet_Boots
04-26-2007, 08:27 AM
At zero point zero nine gallons per minute, it's pretty much a hundred percent drift.

Remote Pigtails
04-26-2007, 08:29 AM
If zero overspray is the real objective, then another vote for netafim. I've been doing a lot of research into netafim of late for another possible project, and I really like what I'm seeing. Something that small, you could hand slice a double row into the narrow areas. And I would hand slice the 8x10 unless you can get a plow for free. One battery operated valve and be done. Plenty of room to do it all on one zone. If the brown is beds, you could do them in a seperate zone. 360' of netafim in the 1.0 l/h on 18" centers runs just over 1gpm. I count just over 120' of tube to do the green area. You could slice that in with a good sharp square spade in a couple of hours. One draw back.........Netafim isn't going to give you much opp to smell any fumes :)

I'll vote for the netafim as well. I've been using a lot lately with good success.
Either that or go retro and get some brass popups and concrete donuts.

irrig8r
04-26-2007, 09:03 AM
Any of you guys ever use TurfBubblers? They were promoted big time by Pepco/ Nibco a few years back and although I don't think they ever caught on, I liked 'em better than Netafim. When Wade Rain bought Pepco I think they sort of got shelved, but I bought a few through Ewing about three years ago.

I used them in 2 ft. wide turf strips on either side of a lap pool, between the pool and flagstone paths. Worked very nicely at 24" o.c. down the middle.

http://cati.csufresno.edu/CIT/upda/97/spring/story1.html


From another article:

From NIBCO in Fresno, CA, comes an aboveground irrigation system designed to soak, rather than spray, what its developers call a "microflood." According to David Zoldoske, director for the Center for Irrigation Technology (CIT) at Cal State University Fresno, which conducted the premarket testing, the Turf Bubbler Wick Irrigation is designed primarily for turf areas. The system uses 0.25-in. black poly tubing installed just below mowing height spaced at 5-ft. centers. The flow is approximately 22 gal./hr. "What you essentially do is flood a 25-square-foot area," Zoldoske explains. "You overcome the infiltration rate of the soil by applying water faster than it can take it up. The advantage is that the system has very high uniformity---higher than spray heads in some cases---and you don't have the vandalism problem because, although the water bubbles up above the surface, the delivery system isn't visible. The other advantage is that you can drive right over it."

The Turf Bubbler system is also low-pressure. Instead of running the 35 or 40 gal. typical of a spray-head system, the wick system operates closer to 18 or 19 gal., resulting in a reduction of energy and water. One particular advantage is that because the system is placed at 5-ft. centers, it works well in areas where turf abuts hardscape. The design is such that the first row is actually installed 2.5 ft. out from the hardscape, eliminating spray and hardscape flooding.

Zoldoske notes that installation usually costs more because the system requires more trenching than spray systems, and it has a learning curve. "You need a minimum duration of time (35 to 40 minutes) to get water to flow completely and fill in the circles," Zoldoske explains. "So you might not be able to irrigate every day; it might be every second or third day, depending on the size. If you were to run it 10 minutes a day as you would a conventional system, what you'd have is a bunch of little green circles."

Ed Norum, consultant to CIT, thinks the wick system is tailor-made for roadside vegetation but warns that unless the area to be irrigated is absolutely flat, there must be grass or some significant thatch for it to work properly. "It doesn't work on bare ground, especially if it's bare ground on a slope," he warns. "The groundcover doesn't have to be sod, it can be grass, as long as there is some kind of impedance. The system is well suited for turf areas in median strips, and it has been wonderful around motels and things where you have a little strip 5 or 10 feet across and you can't figure out any other way to irrigate it without throwing water all over the place."

Well, the Internet Wayback Machine shows them having an active website from Dec. 1998 thru Nov. 2002. Then they sort of disappeared.... someone else picked up the name...but if you go to this link and click on vatious dates you cabn se what the webpages looked like...

http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://www.turfbubbler.com


Including this:

Irrigation Business & Technology Magazine Says:"This new irrigation technology has arrived that may be the best solution for turf irrigation since the development of the impact sprinkler in 1933."

Another BIG IDEA bites the dust.... I guess... but apparently still in the NIBCO catalog as of 2006....

Keith
04-26-2007, 01:22 PM
I'm saddened by what seems to be a distinct lack of enthusiasm for Toro's 2x6 side strip nozzles. :p

I have 10 or so of em in one of the Noz Boxes for such occasions. They'll probably work fine in a 570 pressure regulated body, but they didn't quite do what I expected sticking up on small risers in a bed. They seemed to put out more water at 11 o'clock and 1 o'clock than anywhere else.

CAPT Stream Rotar
04-27-2007, 06:22 AM
I have 10 or so of em in one of the Noz Boxes for such occasions. They'll probably work fine in a 570 pressure regulated body, but they didn't quite do what I expected sticking up on small risers in a bed. They seemed to put out more water at 11 o'clock and 1 o'clock than anywhere else.

triangulate the microgATIOWN....

like i said earlier......6 halfs>say good night

alf51175
04-27-2007, 08:53 AM
Have you thought of subsurface irrigation? That would not have overspray.

DanaMac
04-27-2007, 09:06 AM
Have you thought of subsurface irrigation? That would not have overspray.

That is what NetaFim is, which was already suggested.

alf51175
04-27-2007, 10:09 AM
Sorry, not familiar with that one, have heard of the Toro DL2000 system.

Mike Leary
04-27-2007, 06:23 PM
What's the deal, Jon, we all wear shoes in the PNW..a little overspray?
I still like 1800's w/ weather-matic 5510s...just mite make it w/1806 heads
to get the "lift". M