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View Full Version : 2 Valves on one zone?


dbinaz
04-27-2007, 12:17 PM
Is it bad to control 2 valves on one zone? Or should it always be 1 for 1?

THanks,
Derek

CAPT Stream Rotar
04-27-2007, 12:28 PM
I mean what are you running off the zone?

do you mainfold?
I have never heard about 2 valves on 1 zone.....but im not gods gift to irrigation..guys like wet boots/purp haze/dirty water are pretty good on this stuff..

let me know how it goes buddy

Wet_Boots
04-27-2007, 12:51 PM
Most controllers can manage it, with the provision that you are not powering a master valve or pump relay. What's the reason for running two valves at one time?

Dirty Water
04-27-2007, 01:47 PM
I'm going to say he needs to match output GPM better. I'd say something like running drip concurrent with a rotor zone.

jerryrwm
04-27-2007, 02:35 PM
Like Boots said - you can run two zones on a controller station.
Some instances might be:
Two small zones seperated by larger zones. ie. small turf panels that are not large enough for rotors. Wire them together to utilize system flow capacity.

Two small areas seperated across a large expanse of paving or concrete. Rather than running an additional long length of pipe through a sleeve (if there is a sleeve available) wire two smaller valves together and utilize system flow capability.

You can water two drip zones that are widely seperated can be wired together to get the most out of the system.

On a large system 4" ML or larger with a small water window, you can run multiple zones simultaneously. On a 6" looped ML with a 4" meter we ran two controllers at a time, two valves per station (70-75 GPM/valve) in order to get them done within the water window we had during restriction periods. We actually had 5 controllers and 150 2" valves. Had the ability to water the area once every 5 days and no daytime watering.(Austin, TX. water restrictions). Did some creative scheduling and divided the property into 4 water day sections. Worked fine.

So, yes if you need it, you can run multiple zones on the same station.

sheshovel
04-27-2007, 02:40 PM
I mean what are you running off the zone?

do you mainfold?
I have never heard about 2 valves on 1 zone.....but im not gods gift to irrigation..guys like wet boots/purp haze/dirty water are pretty good on this stuff..

let me know how it goes buddy

Yes you can, like the guys said above.
Rotar has learned quickly, tell me Rotar, what does "do you manifold" mean?

CAPT Stream Rotar
04-27-2007, 02:52 PM
a few valves>1 box...


mainifold=main junction aka heart of the system....
but i learned that in irrigation school in TeJas

sheshovel
04-27-2007, 03:02 PM
NoNoNo what does and I quote "do you manifold" mean? I know what a manifold is

CAPT Stream Rotar
04-27-2007, 03:05 PM
ahhhh i see i wanted to know how does he set up his valves......

Ie.. mainfold or every zone=separate? not sure what you call that?

sheshovel
04-27-2007, 03:07 PM
gotttcha................

CAPT Stream Rotar
04-27-2007, 03:09 PM
what is the other way called? out of curisioty?

and how do i set up a signature?

Mike Leary
04-27-2007, 04:08 PM
On larger sites, we have added two valves that can run in tandem ,or, if more
control or loss of pressure occurs, be split. I agree to adding valves when
too much distance between the zone happens, more cheapo than running laterals all over the place. Rain Master clocks can take 1 amp per station, 2 amps per controller. Weather-Matic valves eat .4 amps.

bicmudpuppy
04-27-2007, 10:13 PM
Mike's example is on the money. The specs on your controller and your valves tell the story. I have RC12's running 4 solenoids per station with no problems, but they are valve-in-head saddle type solenoids and the old mechanical clocks designed to push the old thermal hydraulic valves have a larger capacity than some of the new digital solid state controllers.
Some of the larger commercial controllers can run large banks of zones at one time. Some of these larger controllers function as well as they do because they don't have to open all of those solenoids at once. Holding amps on a solenoid are much smaller than the initial inrush rating

PurpHaze
04-27-2007, 11:13 PM
Jerry is spot on when it comes to some of the larger systems. I also know that two 2" valves are often tied together at the clock to run a single large zone because the designer/installer doesn't know how to run 3" laterals in/out of a 2" valve or 4" laterals through a 3" valve. :)