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Dirty Water
04-27-2007, 10:19 PM
I was a primarily PVC installer, but I did use Poly in some situtations. The largest poly I ever used was 2" for a suction line for a pump (Fed it out 15' into a lake and staked it so it was about 6' under water.

Anyways, aside from getting prohibitivly expensive, Poly that size is a real bear to handle compared to PVC.

Does anyone use big poly? 2" and above?

CAPT Stream Rotar
04-27-2007, 10:42 PM
myself i never used over 2inch....

but im a pup so that statment will hopefully change...
on a sidenote i was tossing some rolls around and the 2 inch came untapped..so i kicked it down to the ground and WAAAAAAAMMMMMMMM!
i took a shot to the Jaw.....its these lessons that i learn the quickest...pain=dont do it again

PurpHaze
04-27-2007, 11:41 PM
We have some HDPE main line in the ground that is 4" diameter.

bicmudpuppy
04-28-2007, 12:27 AM
Does a water reel count? We had two large water reels at a golf course in a time far far away that had 4" poly. I never understood why such large pipe. I see reels now with much smaller pipe/hose that do about the same thing. Pop called them "circuses", complained that he only had two rings instead of 3. We used these to water large rough areas that were not irrigated.
I've worked on some 4" poly suction lines as well. I've learned not to like poly suction lines. The barb connections are the first place to look when priming problems show up.

PurpHaze
04-28-2007, 02:25 AM
The 4" HDPE was put in one summer when I was on vacation. It was an emergency move of a backflow and subsequent tie-in for a section of high school athletic fields next to our main stadium. It was supposed to wait until I got back and we were going to do it with PVC. However, the construction of a new restroom building and handicapped parking and ramped area for the stadium got moved up so they called in a company to do it. They decided on HDPE instead of PVC due to a bend that needed to be made at the far end of the stadium.

bobw
04-28-2007, 11:33 AM
I use 2" poly on large systems anytime I have to pass a mainline through a sleeve. Call me superstitious, but I just don't like to put a joint under a driveway, so I transition over to poly for that. I figure even if a site screws up their winterization, they won't have to break pavement for the repairs.

PurpHaze
04-28-2007, 11:57 AM
I use 2" poly on large systems anytime I have to pass a mainline through a sleeve. Call me superstitious, but I just don't like to put a joint under a driveway, so I transition over to poly for that. I figure even if a site screws up their winterization, they won't have to break pavement for the repairs.

We had just that problem with a new elementary school site only 6 months after it opened. A 4" PVC main line went unprotected under a 36' wide bus drive lane and started leaking. The main line was supposed to have been installed looped but wasn't in this area as it was a spur main line for the front of the site. PVC 3" diameter pipe will not go through 4"... but 3" HDPE pipe will. The original 4" main line was cut on both ends and used as a sleeve to run the 3" HDPE pipe through which was then reconnected to the original 4" PVC main on both ends of the bus drive.

Turf2NV
04-28-2007, 01:34 PM
I have used as large as 12" HDPE on a 2000 GPM golf course system. All mains were HDPE started as 12" at the pump house and looped throughout the course. We had 12,10,8,6,4 inch HDPE mains, and all 2" sch 40 laterals. The HDPE was great stuff, tough to move 50' sticks of 12", but you could bend it to a 20' radius and drive a JD 750 bulldozer over it without damage.

Kyle

Wet_Boots
04-28-2007, 01:43 PM
How were you connecting the large-diameter HDPE? I don't see any 12-inch barbed fittings in my catalogs.

Dirty Water
04-28-2007, 02:11 PM
Butt fusioning. Otherwise known as plastic welding.

Its an art I wish I knew.

Mike Leary
04-28-2007, 02:33 PM
Butt fusioning. Otherwise known as plastic welding.

Its an art I wish I knew.

I worked a site where the dirt guys used it...the machine is pricey, but I
believe a lot of suppliers rent them. I think H.D. Fowler has one. Cool.

PurpHaze
04-29-2007, 01:02 AM
Butt fusioning. Otherwise known as plastic welding.

HDPE matches up with IPS diameters, can be cut into where you want and then can be manipulated with mechanical fittings also (i.e. cutting in a tee if need be in the future). Only difference is that a "stiffener" is inserted into the inner diameter to give it extra strength against potential crushing effects of the mechanical joint.

Dirty Water
04-29-2007, 01:10 AM
HDPE matches up with IPS diameters, can be cut into where you want and then can be manipulated with mechanical fittings also (i.e. cutting in a tee if need be in the future). Only difference is that a "stiffener" is inserted into the inner diameter to give it extra strength against potential crushing effects of the mechanical joint.

Yup, but I think Boots was more concerned about a new initial install.

I doubt they use mechanical couplers on each stick.

PurpHaze
04-29-2007, 01:24 AM
I'm well aware of butt fusion welding. That's why my answer was quantified with "i.e. cutting in a tee if need be in the future" which means something totally different. If one runs into it in the field they need not panic about not being welding certified and having the equipment (or hiring an outside contractor to do it). :)

One drawback to HDPE pipe is that it can "creep" and may need thrust blocks poured depending on the unique situations that one runs into.

Turf2NV
04-29-2007, 07:59 AM
The intial install was butt fusion and some electrofusion couplers. The couplers work really neat, fit everything together and connect a couple of electrical probes to the coupler. The probes heat a metal grid inside the coupler and just like the butt fusion melt the pipe and as it cools the pipes become one continous pipe. The site was pure sand, and the HDPE fusion eliminated the need for thrust blocking which would have been huge amounts of concrete in the sandy soils. For more info on the machines and fittings I would check the ISCO website (www.isco-pipe.com). The butt fusion machine is big and expensive, the elctrofusion machine is small and very versitile for the number of couplers it can use to put pipe together and the sizes of pipe.

Kartanimal29
04-29-2007, 08:10 PM
On a Golf Course I've pulled 2in. and installed 10in. HDPE for mainline

mikecaldwell1204
04-30-2007, 09:06 PM
Down here in florida they use the larger 12" diameter hdpe when there redoing roads to use for some kind of water pipe. I don't know if the government would allow you to use that for drinking water though?

PurpHaze
04-30-2007, 10:49 PM
HDPE pipe is "watermain" rated and can be used for domestic supplies. It can be used in lieu of AWWA C-900 pipe (bluish-green PVC and CPVC) which is widely used in water main construction.

HDPE is also used in the "bursting technique" of older pipes; water, sewer, etc.