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View Full Version : What precautions do you take when applying product?


MrC
04-29-2007, 01:47 PM
I just read the label for Momentum FX and it basically tells you to cover your whole body before prepping and applying product. It makes me wonder what risks I'm taking by using this product.

motoguy
04-29-2007, 05:49 PM
To answer the original poster...I wear jeans, a short-sleeve polo shirt, and work boots to every spray. I'm wearing a lightweight, long-sleeve Key / Dickie coverall over that, sunglasses (comfort / eye protection), and a half-face respirator with charcoal cartridges.

Yeah, it gets hot out there sometimes. But all I have to do is see that my tan leather workboots are now blue, the wash-water from the overalls is tinted blue, and my respirator filter has a nice blue haze to it. Did I mention I use a blue marker dye in my spray? ;)

Might be overkill, but I'll trade some short-term discomfort during the day for some long-term, healthy time with those I love. The overalls help ward off the skin cancer demon, too. :)

Of course, I'm the same guy that dons -all- of my protective motorcycle gear (boots, gloves, back protector, helmet, Aerostich riding suit) just to run across town. Hey, the day I can -absolutely- predict when I'll need safety gear, is the day I'll quit wearing it all the time.

Ric
04-29-2007, 06:57 PM
To answer the original poster...I wear jeans, a short-sleeve polo shirt, and work boots to every spray. I'm wearing a lightweight, long-sleeve Key / Dickie coverall over that, sunglasses (comfort / eye protection), and a half-face respirator with charcoal cartridges.

Yeah, it gets hot out there sometimes. But all I have to do is see that my tan leather workboots are now blue, the wash-water from the overalls is tinted blue, and my respirator filter has a nice blue haze to it. Did I mention I use a blue marker dye in my spray? ;)

Might be overkill, but I'll trade some short-term discomfort during the day for some long-term, healthy time with those I love. The overalls help ward off the skin cancer demon, too. :)

Of course, I'm the same guy that dons -all- of my protective motorcycle gear (boots, gloves, back protector, helmet, Aerostich riding suit) just to run across town. Hey, the day I can -absolutely- predict when I'll need safety gear, is the day I'll quit wearing it all the time.

MotoGuy

Leather work boots for spraying are a NO NO they absorb liquids and can not be cleaned. Unlined chemical resistant Rubber boots are best but I have used Rubber pullover boots over Tennis shoes. At Present time I am wearing a Steel Toe rubber work boot that is chemical resistant.

Most Labels also require Long Sleeve Shirts as part of your PPE (Personal Protection Equipment) I believe Short Sleeve shirts in summer everyone cheats on.

americanlawn
04-29-2007, 07:31 PM
In 1981, ChemLawn did a study on the affects of "colonestrace levels" in the bloodstream. (I worked for them 1978 - 1989).

The study compared 2 study groups.

1st group) Those that bundled up with face mask, apron, goggles, gloves, and boots while mixing and loading their spray trucks.

2nd group) Those who wore no protective clothing, but they we just as careful as group 1.

Results: Group 1 showed much higher colonestrace levels.
Group 1 also had a markedly higher rate of employee accidents during filling. Tripping over their aprons, poor vision due to goggles fogging up, etc
Group 1 also had a much higher rate of chemical spills. (duh)

Every ChemLawn branch in North America received the results of this study.


I am no rocket scientist, but here's what I know:

My Dad is a retired farmer. 87 years old and in good health.

I have not ever missed any day at work due to any kind of illness for 30 years now.

After 30 years in this industry, I still am the 1st person at work everyday, and I am the last person to go home at the end of each day.

The above are facts.

I hope that nobody who has posted here had to fight in Viet Nam and experience the "agent orange" effects.

By the way, even chemLawn used 245T (agent orange) as a herbicide up until the late 70's. (safe if used at recommended rates for weeds).

Note: respectfully, the term "ChemLawn" is in regard to the "original Pioneer" of professional lawn care. (before they were bought out 3 different times).

Sounds like ChemLawn will be "aquired" again later this summer (a 4th time).

I'm guessing the Duke brothers are rolling over in their graves, and I don't blame them whatsoever.

Here's my problem....new employees half my age who seem to "get sick often"??? Missing work the day after they get their paycheck.....hmmmm

Maybe they should wear aprons & goggles all the time.

This forum cracks me up. Thanks for the humor - it made my day.

Americanlawn (not a senior member)

MrC
04-29-2007, 09:20 PM
So next time I spray I should wear jeans, long sleeve shirt, goggles, mask, and rubber covers for shoes. I'm new to lawncare but I take similar precautions when working with certain detail products on cars.

Will the rubber covers that you put on dress shoes when it rains do for protecting your sneakers?

americanlawn
04-29-2007, 09:40 PM
MrC -- I hear ya. In eighth grade, a classmate of mine died. He worked in his Dad's autobody paint shop.

He died from paint fumes from his Dad's paint & body shop. I was a pall barrer at his funeral.

Here's the deal:
Some chemicals are designed to be used around humans & other animals.

I for one, am glad for the technology that American companies have developed in order to allow us to live in the way we now expect.

MrC
04-29-2007, 10:19 PM
Sorry to hear about your loss. Life is short enough as it is, why not take the extra time to be around longer.

Quick question, other than thickness are all nitrile gloves equally effective in resisting chemicals?

Shades of Green LService
04-29-2007, 10:30 PM
Americanlawn (not a senior member)

Getting closer.:drinkup: Are you going to stop posting when you become the dreaded " Senior member" ? It's just a post count.

Ric
04-30-2007, 12:38 AM
Americanlawn

I am not going to argue that Chemical manufacture put more precautions on the label than necessary. However why risk your health by ignoring those precaution totally??? I am guilty of not using goggles or aprons Etc. However I believe not wearing rubber shoes or boots is just plain stupidity. I haven't wore a mask in years and I let by 7-11 $ 7.00 sun glasses be my eye protection and end up wearing them on my head so I can see the spray pattern better.


Mr C

I have used the slip on rubber overshoe over my tennis shoes and feel it is as safe as any foot wear. I bought several pair from a chemical suppler that are suppose to be chemical resistant. BTW wearing Gloves with hand cream inside sure helps to gives a nice manicure.

MrC
04-30-2007, 07:07 AM
Can you recommend a site for rubber slip ons for shoes?

Ric
04-30-2007, 09:15 AM
Can you recommend a site for rubber slip ons for shoes?

Bata Shoe Company
Baltimore Md.
800 365 2282

lilmarvin4064
04-30-2007, 09:16 AM
Lesco has some "overshoes" that slip over your sneakers. I have been using some muckboots for the past couple years and I really like them. http://www.muckandstuff.com/ I got them on sale at Tractor Supply and they actually had my size (13).

lawnangel1
04-30-2007, 12:34 PM
I wear chemical resistant boots and a pair of safety/sunglasses on every application. I add the gloves if I am doing a liquid application. Are those muck boots comfortable? I have seen many farmers wear them but never any applicators, but now that I am thinking it sounds like they would work well.

garydale
04-30-2007, 04:07 PM
Read the label and apply common sense. Otherwise become a teacher.

Those that can do, those that can't teach.

Ric
04-30-2007, 04:12 PM
Read the label and apply common sense. Otherwise become a teacher.

Those that can do, those that can't teach.

If You can't Do It, be a Teacher.

If you can't Teach, Teach Teachers how to Teach.

americanlawn
04-30-2007, 08:11 PM
No way, Shades. I'll stop complaining. I like checking out the daily topics here, but I'm sure I'll slack off periodocily.
It's "spring fever" time now, so I figure I'll stick around for awhile. Then...off & on.

Later, American.

americanlawn
04-30-2007, 08:28 PM
Best price. Best spray boots> gemplers.com

They have a wide selection, so you can pick whatever you want.

We use item # G86103 PVS plain toe Onguard boots.
So comfortable that my guys often forget to take them off.

NOTE: add extra padding/arch supports so your feet do not ache at the end of the day.

The sizes run a bit large, so if you're a 10 1/2, order a ten.

LESCO sells the same boot, but they charge more.

I take out the laces so I can slip them on & off as needed. Your choice.

Mine wore out after three years. That's how long they last.

Cost: $22.00

Buy them -- trust me. Good luck.

sprayboy
04-30-2007, 10:20 PM
[QUOTE=americanlawn;1813983]Best price. Best spray boots> gemplers.com

They have a wide selection, so you can pick whatever you want.

We use item # G86103 PVS plain toe Onguard boots.
So comfortable that my guys often forget to take them off.

Americanlawn, I used to get the same thing from Gemplers but they switched to Onguard brand instead of Bata. They told me that Onguard bought bata. The boot feels totally different to me, wider and uncomfortable. I don't like the new ones. Has anyone there mentioned this.

americanlawn
04-30-2007, 10:27 PM
Just got my new ones. Identical with the Bata's.

motoguy
05-01-2007, 04:01 AM
Leather work boots for spraying are a NO NO they absorb liquids and can not be cleaned. Unlined chemical resistant Rubber boots are best but I have used Rubber pullover boots over Tennis shoes.

Unbelievable. You know the worst part? I actually -know- this. I have no idea what kind of brain fade put me here. I'm still shaking my head at it. I'm glad this thread popped up...I feel like a paranoid guy checking the rubber seal for leaks on a submarine door. Only to have someone point out it's a screen door. ;)

americanlawn
05-01-2007, 08:17 PM
That's the old joke: "It makes about as much sense as a screen door in a submarine".

Classic, but good.

I wondered, cuz our boots used to be Bata. That was back in the late 70's and since. I use arch supports plus an extra layer of foot pads in mine. After a couple of months, it begins to fit like a comfortable shoe.

One problem: my right little toe...I took a grinder and shaved off a small portion of the inside of my right boot, cuz I was getting a blister. Now -- no problem.

Bata was a darn good company, but Gempler has always treated us very fine. Gempler ships out fast, and they are very friendly. I wouldn't buy from anyone else. Good people.

MrC
05-01-2007, 09:41 PM
Are all PVC boots and overshoes chemical resistant?