PDA

View Full Version : ROTARD wants to know:Landscaping VS.Irrigation


CAPT Stream Rotar
04-29-2007, 02:49 PM
ok well first off i know what fourm im on...(belive me i know)
but my landscape Boss(guy who signs the paychecks) and my Irrigation boss (guy with some personal issues) always battle about

LANDSCRAPING VS. IRRITATION-which is harder to do/bill.

1boss says irrigation has more to worry about...which i can understand.Turn ons/service work/Troubleshooting, and installs can be tough if the Gerbils( as we like to call new guys) are on the job or not..
there are pros n cons for both..I really care less.. but i think irrigation has more to worry about..here is why
1.our pipes are in the ground where we cant see
2.with the industry changing rapidly its hard to keep up with all the products
3.we have to tap into the main water supply which involves plumbing
4.we use electricity, wires and pipe.....all under ground...
5.customers can see landscaping, but not always understand irrigation
i have a few more things but thats enough for now..i will spell check my writting..thats if even anyone responds to me..

:)

CAPT Stream Rotar
04-29-2007, 03:17 PM
::runs away::

sheshovel
04-29-2007, 03:53 PM
Landscapers have to deal with all you listed above because we install systems too. Plus, drainage, grading, site conditions, soil conditions, sun and shade, plant types + names and knowledge of plant material and planting. Trees, shrubs, perennial plants, herbaceous and woody, lawn installation, sod and seeding
We have to know materials like stone, boulders, gravel, flagstone and pavers, mulch, planting mixes, soil conditioners ect.
We have to be able to construct water features, create entire garden spaces that are usable, practical and pleasing to the eye. We have to deal with designing and designers, clients who change their mind 1/2 way through a project or run out of $$ cuz they add on as we go.
Dry creek beds and pergolas, trellises and the like.
I could go on and on, but you get the picture. Not saying we are better, but landscapers have a wide variety of concerns that cover a large range of necessary knowledge to be able to perform their work.

Mike Leary
04-29-2007, 03:58 PM
Nice post She....one thing I noticed over the years was any contractor that
advertised "we do it all" did irrigation crummy (even had a few admit it!)
Properly done, irrigation can be a great way to make a living (if you find
the right market!).

sheshovel
04-29-2007, 04:14 PM
I am sure it is, however I am not looking to change careers at this point thank you.

Remote Pigtails
04-29-2007, 04:18 PM
Nice post She....one thing I noticed over the years was any contractor that
advertised "we do it all" did irrigation crummy (even had a few admit it!)
Properly done, irrigation can be a great way to make a living (if you find
the right market!).

I prefer irr to lndscpng cuz of the perishable factor of plants. Dallas in my opinion may be the best irrigation market in the country. Year round work, lots of big spenders, hot climate, and lots of houses. If you have a lot of energy and can deal with the constant state of urgency a lot of money can be made here.

Remote Pigtails
04-29-2007, 04:20 PM
I prefer irr to lndscpng cuz of the perishable factor of plants. Dallas in my opinion may be the best irrigation market in the country. Year round work, lots of big spenders, hot climate, and lots of houses. If you have a lot of energy and can deal with the constant state of urgency a lot of money can be made here.

OOOPS I just realized this was to educate goofball. Terrible market-stay home-the Kennedys need you in Cape Cod.

Mike Leary
04-29-2007, 04:22 PM
I prefer irr to lndscpng cuz of the perishable factor of plants. Dallas in my opinion may be the best irrigation market in the country. Year round work, lots of big spenders, hot climate, and lots of houses. If you have a lot of energy and can deal with the constant state of urgency a lot of money can be made here.

Downside: if plants die, guess who gets the blame?, not the nursery, not
the LA, not the installer....YOU irrigation prima donna!:laugh:

Remote Pigtails
04-29-2007, 04:33 PM
Downside: if plants die, guess who gets the blame?, not the nursery, not
the LA, not the installer....YOU irrigation prima donna!:laugh:

Yeah maybe some. Most people realize dallas is one of the toughest gardening climates in the US. Also I'm pretty good at customer education. As you well know Mike cyb is an experience factor. I even tell customers where their dead spots are going to be in the spring during the fall because i locate all the brown patch spots caused by poor drainage and over watering.

Mike Leary
04-29-2007, 04:41 PM
Good point, education of clients most important....rookie mouthoffs cause
much damage & I've had to take my pups aside & inform them "I'm the one
who will put my foot in to this..not you with your percieved three years of
"journeyperson" experience"!

CAPT Stream Rotar
04-29-2007, 07:54 PM
OOOPS I just realized this was to educate goofball. Terrible market-stay home-the Kennedys need you in Cape Cod.

Lol buddy...well when i went to school with ben fisher in DFW i met a ton of people in industry all around...all of which needed certification to use the water supply.not sure of the name but i know for a fact i could pass that texas contractor License test hands down..any hoot.A rainbird salesmen "joe" was telling me about how things worked down south...I was shocked to learn about some of the ways people irrigate...
completly different world down there..it seemed sub-devlopments were a dime a dozen down there.....I just might someday take that test and do some water works in the Plano area
w00t!

Wet_Boots
04-29-2007, 08:00 PM
Read everything archived here, and you can get a foothold in the vital FIMCO portion of the Dallas market.

CAPT Stream Rotar
04-29-2007, 08:07 PM
Thank you,Wet Boots. that archive link you provided me was very resourceful and im still using it as we speak..Right now im working in my back yard on a garden....starting from scratch and recycling the sod...which sucks, because so far from what I see the sod is diseased with red thread...I will be upset if the grass is lost, cause i am re-installing it in an other part of the lawn..but i learned a few tips from those archives that will save my back,and help me with future lawn care...

I know all you guys hate me, but thank you for putting up with me/helping me out..

Eddie B.

YardPro
04-29-2007, 09:06 PM
i do both, and i will say without a doubt that the irrigation side in general has less to worry about.

in general all irrigtion systems are the same, pipe, valves, heads, and controller....not nearly as many variables as the rest of the landscape spectrum...

in landscape installs, you need to work with much more math to calculate volumes of material, cut and full measurements, slopes, soil types, aesthetic issues, plant types, mulch types, a wide array of chemical knowledge, as well as a wider equipment knowledge, etc....

irrigation is not easy to do right, but in the scheme of things is is one small part of the overall picture, just like hards capes, drainage, etc.... a necessary one, but still a component of the larger scheme of the job.

Mad Estonian
04-30-2007, 01:33 AM
Ensuring that you're a well-trained, well-educated professional, who works hard, does the job right, takes care of your customers, pays attention to details, has the right tools for the job etc. etc. etc.- it doesn't make a damn bit of difference what field of work you're in, it's all equally hard, and equally satisfying. Take what you can from your bosses, and when you're ready, go out on your own. Then you won't have to put up with their b.s. any more. But take a basic business course before you do (wish I had, I'm just catching up now).

Remote Pigtails
04-30-2007, 02:04 AM
Read everything archived here, and you can get a foothold in the vital FIMCO portion of the Dallas market.

Excellent, now I can focus on the toro hydraulic systems.