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View Full Version : Backflow inside or out?


jlouki01
04-29-2007, 10:46 PM
What is the difference between installing the back flow in the house vs. outside? We are in Ohio and I have seen a couple different setups. Some are burying them by the water meter and some are putting them in the mulch bed. Why not put it in the basement where the water connection comes in so you can just turn it off in the winter, blow the system out. I see everyone putting them outside, removing them and taping off the connections?

Critical Care
04-29-2007, 11:13 PM
Basement? What's a basement?

Newer homes in this area will have double check valve assemblies located in valve boxes out by the street next to the meter. The same home will also have another DCVA, also in a valve box, used just for the irrigation system.

Not too many people remove the DCVAs out here, however more and more people are installing these devices with unions.

I don't know if I'd like to blow out systems where I'd have to drag a hose through the house and down into the basement. As it is, I can do this work without the owners having to be home.

CAPT Stream Rotar
04-30-2007, 06:13 AM
depends where you are i suppose.

I noticed down south in Texas its a DCA installed in the ground after the water meter..here in mass they are usually PVB/AVB outside installed on or by the fourm of the house..

i think outside installation is better but thats my opinion..good luck buddy.

Flow Control
04-30-2007, 06:39 AM
What is the difference between installing the back flow in the house vs. outside? We are in Ohio and I have seen a couple different setups. Some are burying them by the water meter and some are putting them in the mulch bed. Why not put it in the basement where the water connection comes in so you can just turn it off in the winter, blow the system out. I see everyone putting them outside, removing them and taping off the connections?

What type of backflow are you talking about?

Mike Leary
04-30-2007, 10:36 AM
When we tested backflow, I charged extra if the assembly was in a crawl or a hard-to-get-to area. Winterize is easy w/a bicycle pump..all it takes is 7psi.
Unions are code in this area(I helped write the code) so as to remove for ball
valve replacement or to inspect the innards.

justgeorge
04-30-2007, 04:28 PM
Assuming the "Liberty Township" you live in is in Butler County, the backflow required is a reduced pressure backflow. On VERY rare occasions, they can stick open and dump large amounts of water out the bottom (the dump port). That is why around here they are placed outside not in the basement.

They could be put in the basement if you also plumbed about a 3" PVC drain under the dump port if you also have a place to run that drain to in your basement without causing problems.

George

Mike Leary
04-30-2007, 04:41 PM
Code here requires slab, sleeves for inlet & outlet + drain to sump & enclosure. If it can be mounted in basement with room to test & drain, Go.
Most basements are heated somewhat, so no winterize. RPs seem to becoming nation-wide as a way for purveyors to cover their a.ses.
Check with your purveyor first about install specs.

miyata
07-01-2007, 07:58 PM
What is the difference between installing the back flow in the house vs. outside? We are in Ohio and I have seen a couple different setups. Some are burying them by the water meter and some are putting them in the mulch bed. Why not put it in the basement where the water connection comes in so you can just turn it off in the winter, blow the system out. I see everyone putting them outside, removing them and taping off the connections?

I know what you mean. In colder places meters are inside the basement. Why not install BP in the basement before main line goes to the yard?

PurpHaze
07-01-2007, 09:45 PM
Seems to be a regional and/or local thingey. :)

Wet_Boots
07-01-2007, 11:42 PM
I know what you mean. In colder places meters are inside the basement. Why not install BP in the basement before main line goes to the yard?Because an RPZ is capable of blowing the entire flow capacity of the water supply though a dime-sized hole. Most residences are not prepared to drain away that much water spewing from an RPZ..