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clallen03
05-12-2007, 01:06 AM
This is a lawn that was seeded in October 06 with Lesco Transition blend Fescue. The lawn was started from nothing so this is its first summer. The weather in this area has been really dry and over 80 degree.

This problem has progressed from a few small spots to one large problem. Last week the entire lawn was looking dry so this spot didn't stand out like this. I talked her into watering and the lawn greened back up. Now this area need some serious attention.

I was thinking that it was brown patch but not sure.

Can anyone lD this problem and give me some suggestions to remedy it?

Thanks for all your help.:)

clallen03
05-12-2007, 01:08 AM
Couple more shots

mkroher
05-12-2007, 08:10 AM
Looks like brown patch to me..but too late to do anything about it.

ThreeWide
05-12-2007, 09:01 AM
Not absolutely certain, but the lesions do look like brown patch.

Spray a good systemic fungicide at the curative rate, along with micronutrients. It should knock it out.

What is the treatment history on this Fescue? Having BP this early might indicate too much N in the past couple of months.

mow2nd
05-12-2007, 10:31 AM
Could be from the dog.............bet they have a lab

RAlmaroad
05-12-2007, 10:39 AM
Before any applications, try watering it deeply with one of those moving sideways springlers for about an hour. Deep watering. Then decide if the turf has died or stressed by the recent cold spell. Probably not but a quick test would tell you something unless y'all gotten more rain than TN.

Harley-D
05-12-2007, 12:09 PM
Soil test?
If it was planted last fall i'm suprised to see it that way this year.
:confused:
water deeply every third day and start mowing to 4 inches.
if still brown after a week do a late pre-emergent with a good amount of quick release fert. 70%-50% fast.
IMO i would waste the money on the fungicide, it's too late.

clallen03
05-12-2007, 12:14 PM
This lawn was fertilized in mid march with a 25-2-5. It is now due for another feeding, but I'm hesitant to do anything until I can get this problem under control.

I don't think its a problem from the cold spell we had and the grass has been water pretty well for the past week. This has gradually got worst and started before the cold spell. They don't have any pets but they do have kids next door that run through the lawn from time to time, but thats no big issue.

I was thinking it was some type of fungus because of the way the blades look, but I'm not sure.

Anyone else want to take a shot at it?

Thanks

ThreeWide
05-12-2007, 01:13 PM
Right now, Fescue is having issues with hot spots from the temps and lack of rain. Our humidity has not been high enough to cause lots of BP, but you never know.

It appears from the close photos that you do have visible lesions on the leaf surfaces. If you look on the outside edge of the brown areas and see lesions on the green tissue, you know it is disease. I only say BP because that is normally what occurs on Fescue in our area. You have to examine the lesions very closely to make that determination. One thing that throws me is that BP is normally circular patterns. What you have is obviously not circular. How long have you been seeing this condition? If this kicked off in cooler weather, it could be Pythium.

To be complete, the only way a disease can be effectively diagnosed is through the lab. We in the field obviously cannot do that, so we make good guesses based on symptoms.

This link is a very good tool for diagnosis. Turfgrass diseases in GA (http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/B1233.htm)

lawnservice
05-12-2007, 01:29 PM
whats under the turf? gravel? hardpan?

vegomatic40
05-13-2007, 09:00 AM
Doesn't look like classic lesions from Rhiz.B.P. disease. Looks more like drought damage. The turf that surrounds it is extremely thick and only so much fescue can be supported in a given sq.ft. but it doesn't look like "melting out" either. I would lean in the direction of concealed rock or shallow soil. That area was probably very thin last fall as well. In any event, the turf is dead and may warrant replacement with sod. Seeding too thickly can also contribute to BP disease down the road as air-circulation is decreased. Watch for BP to pop up in the lawn in other spots as the season progresses and humidity rises above 80%.

turfmann
05-13-2007, 12:33 PM
The straw colored bands laterally across the leaf blade without dark margains indicate diurnal heat stress. The dieback from the tip of the blades has a dark margain and looks like a tip blight. You guys in GA haven't had any rain lately, right? The heat and moisure stresses will eventually abate with normal weather and the tip blight normally get mowed off. I would be sure to apply adequate water and down play expectations. Fescue is a lot tougher than we think it is, and smarter, too. It will likely be back to normal soon.

RigglePLC
05-13-2007, 01:28 PM
Corrie,
what kind of grass is this? You said turf type tall fescue--but in the close up picture the leaf blades look very narrow and thin. Yet the adjacent grass has a wider leaf blade and is green. Is this a patch of fine fescue in your tall fescue lawn? In hot dry conditions, a less hardy grass would burn out--leaving only the tall fescue.

turfsolutions
05-13-2007, 03:18 PM
Brown Patch legions stay to the side of the blade. These legions cut all the way across which usually means dollar spot. Either way you need to apply a fungicide at the highest rate recommended. Follow label carefully. Armada is a very good fungicide.

Its not too late as some mentioned, it will bounce back after several weeks if you treat properly. Make sure you are following proper watering and mowing practices. That lawn looks matted to me which means it isn't being cut often enough which results in the lawn staying wet longer, especially down close to the surface. Thats a recipe for fungus. Hope this helps.

clallen03
05-13-2007, 06:58 PM
The entire lawn is the same type of blend, Lesco transition blend fescue. This has been watered every other day pretty thoroughly for the past week. It could have been drought stressed because there was no water at all for about an entire month before they started to water.

Just in case I think Im going to apply a fert with a little N and a fungicide. I probably be going to my local Lesco dealer.

Any recommendations on a product that meets these specifications?

green horizons
05-13-2007, 10:15 PM
I suspect a combination of poor soil (something burried, hardpan,etc.) and lack of water. Also, try to find a seed supplier other than Lesco.

Shades of Green LService
05-13-2007, 11:45 PM
I suspect a combination of poor soil (something burried, hardpan,etc.) and lack of water. Also, try to find a seed supplier other than Lesco.

Whats wrong w/Lesco seed? Seriously, I'm curious. I've always bought my seed from a dealer other than lesco. No good?

Runner
05-13-2007, 11:52 PM
It is nothing to do with a dog. It is brown patch or summer patch. The lesions look like brown patch, but the overall pattern looks like summer patch. I concur with what TurfUnlimited is saying.
Increase the potassium to give the turf a better stand. This increases vascular circulation and will give the plants more trigger pressure so they aren't laying over so lifelessly as they are now (rather common with fescues - especially cut longer). This is causing poor air circulation and is probably causing epidermal heating. In the meantime, an occasional raking to turn the plants, prevent the matting, and allow them to breathe and cool is recommended. It appears that when she took your advice to water it, not a whole lot of circulation was going on...either by water sitting on it all night (?), or just by the matting or a combination of both. Also, back off on the nitrogen, unless you applying the potassium to back it up. That is just stressing the lawn even further in that southern heat. You're not chemlawn LOL. :)

RAlmaroad
05-14-2007, 06:26 AM
It is nothing to do with a dog. It is brown patch or summer patch. The lesions look like brown patch, but the overall pattern looks like summer patch. I concur with what TurfUnlimited is saying.
Increase the potassium to give the turf a better stand. This increases vascular circulation and will give the plants more trigger pressure so they aren't laying over so lifelessly as they are now (rather common with fescues - especially cut longer). This is causing poor air circulation and is probably causing epidermal heating. In the meantime, an occasional raking to turn the plants, prevent the matting, and allow them to breathe and cool is recommended. It appears that when she took your advice to water it, not a whole lot of circulation was going on...either by water sitting on it all night (?), or just by the matting or a combination of both. Also, back off on the nitrogen, unless you applying the potassium to back it up. That is just stressing the lawn even further in that southern heat. You're not chemlawn LOL. :)


Ah Runner--your're wrong! That bottom photo looks like a brown and green collie dog. And your're absolutely right on the epidermal heating. Us old guys called that "Going through a heat" Barns have been know to burn down because of it. And finally, how did that yard get to be so long? NO TURF GRASS can survive much above 4"--isn't that as high as most mowers can be set? In Tn. where fescue is king, we get the summer dieback or "Summer Patch" where hardpan runs closer to surface. This too stresses the root system.

Also, Runner--I always wait to see your posts as they are written with intelligent info--sometimes even with a twist of humor. Good job. Roy

Runner
05-14-2007, 11:47 AM
Ah, yes...A brown and green COLLIE dog! I forgot all ABOUT that! That changes things...Ok,...nevermind my previous post....:D

mrkosar
05-15-2007, 07:52 PM
what about this?

http://www.ext.colostate.edu/PUBS/GARDEN/02901.html

clallen03
05-15-2007, 08:32 PM
The symptoms paragraph sounds very similar to what I have been seeing, but the blade turn straw color all the way to the base if the blade not just the top portion.

I went to Lesco today and had another bad experience (thats another thread). I asked for a fungicide and they wanted to see the pics before they sold me one. I'll bring them these same pics so they can take a stab at it.

They said that different fungicides are used for different fungi. I was expecting to just buy a fungicide and get out of there, boy was I wrong.

GrazerZ
05-15-2007, 09:15 PM
Time for cleary. Are you serious about the dog? He would have to have a fan tip to do that...

Shades of Green LService
05-15-2007, 10:31 PM
Could also be Dollar spot in clumps. Have some of this by me. Manicure T/O flowable w/ accu stick. Low cost P/K. (And it is labled for resedential)

ThreeWide
05-16-2007, 08:36 PM
This should make you feel somewhat better.....

Saw an area of Fescue today having the EXACT same look as yours. These were islands in a parking lot, and each island was elevated in a crown fashion. The tops of the islands all looked like the turf in your picture. I looked at the leaf surfaces, no lesions.

It was clearly moisture stress. This site was not irrigated at all.

RigglePLC
05-16-2007, 09:11 PM
So Clallen,
when you visit Lesco. Just ask them to use their computer to visit this site. Show them you pictures online.

unit28
05-17-2007, 09:00 AM
drought?
doubt it, those pretty flowers sure like cooler temps too.

Grass height , less than desirable.
Lots of competition for sunlight.

Soil is probably thatched up good to, especially with a grass height
like that. Probably cut at 50% when mowed last.


Also the flowers, grass height and water hose in the photo, would suggest
overwatering in that area, but the slope would get runoff especially if the soil is harpacked.

So I would check the soil condition and treat with a fungicide, and mow the grass. tHe fungus is probably 2 fold poor mowing and watering at night.

Most homeowners that overwater have the desire to let that hose run all night, and mow the lawn 2 times a month...LOL:laugh:

RigglePLC
05-17-2007, 09:21 AM
Clallen,
i took another look. The flowers look fine--so does the grass near the flowers--enough moisture at that point.

But in one picture across the top i think I see a straight brown line. This would probably be "heat tracks" injury from mowing when too dry. Now the grass is probably moist and beginning to recover.

turfsurfer
05-17-2007, 10:22 AM
If you're looking for a serious answer, I think mrkosar has it nailed. It's a pretty good bet the lawn has asochyta turf blight. Look at some of your pictures which show the leaf blade with a "pinched appearance " in the top half. Also the straw colored turf and no different color at the margins of the white bands on leaf blades. Look around at some of the other lawns and see if some are having the same symptoms. We are having some problems with this (on bluegrass), and consistant with the diagnosis the symptoms appeared practically overnight. We had the freezing temps come in right when everything turned nice and green in early spring. Then we had a short normal period followed by the last 2 weeks have been mid 80's and very dry. A storm rolled through a couple nights ago and the symptoms are showing up now on alot of lawns.
Good news is with proper watering and management, this is just a leaf blight and does not kill the plant.

clallen03
05-17-2007, 10:59 PM
Im mowed this lawn today and I notice that green grass is coming through the brown grass now. After I cut it noticed that I wasn't able to cut any of the brown grass because it is leaning down so far. That is why that area looks so long. It also looks like because it is so long and thick it is matting some of the areas down blocking all sun light from the soil.
I want to know if you'll think I should hit that area with the trimmer to cut out the dead grass. This will leave a bare spot in the lawn but I think it will fill back in pretty quick. The brown grass is really an eye sore in the lawn.

What do you'll think?

vegomatic40
05-18-2007, 10:20 AM
While many of the people here have given great ideas on the possible cause(s) I still think you are looking at simple drought damage and/or turf death. I've seen both drought stress and active Brown Patch at the same time in one lawn and this isn't it....yet. It will NOT recover as Fescue can only take so much stress before it is gone for good. Cut it out and replace with sod. Thanks for the input from people in warm-season and Bluegrass markets but this is common in the Atlanta area (worked there for 4 yrs.)