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View Full Version : How long till Dandelions shrivel up and die?


Vikings
05-16-2007, 06:46 PM
I sprayed my own yard (and my neighbors) yesterday and some of those dandelions look as healthy as can be.:confused:


I sprayed them with Trillion - P, about 60ml per ten litre water.

americanlawn
05-16-2007, 07:01 PM
1.1 ounces per 1000 square feet should be just right. Not sure what that is in "metric", cuz I'm an American. We spray two gallons total product per 1000square feet. First you will see the stems curl, then the leaves will turn brownish along the edges, then the leaves will begin to curl. It might take up to 3 weeks before the dandies really look dead - then a little longer before they decompose. Regular mowing helps. Hopefully you applied fert too.

Good luck my North American brother, americanlawn.

Vikings
05-16-2007, 07:42 PM
ok, 60mls equals 2 ounces....

7.6 litres (the size of my tank) equals 2 gallons...

So I put in Just less then 50mls to keep the proper ratio (60mls per 2.6 gallons) for the size of my pressure bottle.

If you put in 1.1 once per 2 gallons and my label says 2 ounces per 2.6 gallons, my mixture is a little richer. But I think I probably put half the amount on you do because I was trying to do spot spraying then but ended up with at least a half dozen of yards that needed total coverage. If I have to go back with my little pressure bottle I'll remember your ratio, 1 pressure bottle (2 gallons) per thousand sq ft.

Lol, I was worried all day that I as putting on too much now i'm only worried that I won't get paid:)

RigglePLC
05-16-2007, 08:08 PM
A 5 hp skid sprayer might put down 2 gallons per 1000 sqft.

A back pack would probably apply closer to a half gallon per thousand sqft. Try it with water on concrete to find the correct gallons per thousand output. Then mix according to the area covered, not gallons in sprayer.

Vikings
05-16-2007, 08:58 PM
A 5 hp skid sprayer might put down 2 gallons per 1000 sqft.

A back pack would probably apply closer to a half gallon per thousand sqft. Try it with water on concrete to find the correct gallons per thousand output. Then mix according to the area covered, not gallons in sprayer.

I on occasion did spray cement just to see how much was covered if I did total coverage. Tried to copy the pattern.. are you saying to perhaps make the mix more concentrate?

Ric
05-17-2007, 09:43 AM
I on occasion did spray cement just to see how much was covered if I did total coverage. Tried to copy the pattern.. are you saying to perhaps make the mix more concentrate?

Vikings

No what Riggles is trying to tell you is CALIBRATE your sprayer. First measure a section on cement that is at least 1,000 sq ft. Then spray that section with straight water like you would a Lawn. Now measure to see how much water water is left and subtract that from your starting amount. The difference is how much water you applied to the 1000 sq ft of cement. Use that rate to mix the herbicide and spray a lawn. To be extra safe you might want to use the lowest rate on the label to start with.

Runner
05-17-2007, 09:52 AM
And make sure you use this same spray density when even spot spraying. It is easy to be tempted to "soak" areas down to "make sure" you got them.
As far as the die down, I don't know if I would be too concerned yet or not. I don't know what kind of temps you've been having up there, but these will definitely affect the time of curl and burn down. Here, it has been rather cool. We've had daytime temps in the 60's, 70's and a only couple of days in the 80's. Our night time temps have been in the 50' and 60's, and even as low as into the 40's. Our kill time is extremely slow right now. we are keeping a close eye on them, and they ARE dying, but they are slow to go. So, on that basis, don't be too discouraged yet...especially only a day after. If we were seing consistent temps in the 80's, it would be a different story.

Vikings
05-17-2007, 07:13 PM
Vikings

No what Riggles is trying to tell you is CALIBRATE your sprayer. First measure a section on cement that is at least 1,000 sq ft. Then spray that section with straight water like you would a Lawn. Now measure to see how much water water is left and subtract that from your starting amount. The difference is how much water you applied to the 1000 sq ft of cement. Use that rate to mix the herbicide and spray a lawn. To be extra safe you might want to use the lowest rate on the label to start with.
That's good. Thanks.:)

Vikings
05-17-2007, 07:14 PM
And make sure you use this same spray density when even spot spraying. It is easy to be tempted to "soak" areas down to "make sure" you got them.
As far as the die down, I don't know if I would be too concerned yet or not. I don't know what kind of temps you've been having up there, but these will definitely affect the time of curl and burn down. Here, it has been rather cool. We've had daytime temps in the 60's, 70's and a only couple of days in the 80's. Our night time temps have been in the 50' and 60's, and even as low as into the 40's. Our kill time is extremely slow right now. we are keeping a close eye on them, and they ARE dying, but they are slow to go. So, on that basis, don't be too discouraged yet...especially only a day after. If we were seing consistent temps in the 80's, it would be a different story.
Very cool here at night, even had frost a couple nights ago.

shaneb
05-18-2007, 09:57 AM
This is the perfect scenario for a product like Octane. Octane can be mixed with your systemic herbicides that generally take several days/weeks to kill. With Octane in the tank, dandelions will typically die within 24-72 hours after application, which leads to significant reduction in call backs from customers not seeing the benefits of your spray efforts.

GreenN'Clean
05-18-2007, 03:01 PM
I sprayed my lawn and took about 2 weeks to finally kill off the Dandelions