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Mike M
05-26-2007, 05:27 PM
Anyone recently acquire a digital camera that works well with outdoor lighting? I'd like to pick up something with a nice tonal range so everything is not all bright or dark.

Tanks.

Include some pic's if you can ??

Mike

Eden Lights
05-26-2007, 11:00 PM
Nikon D70, it paid for itself the first night out and it is super easy to use. I also think my Bogen Manfrotto 3175GN3 tripod helped just as much as anything. I heard the 3175 is no longer being made, I really questioned the need for such a tank, but I wouldn't take nothing for it now. I have attached my first D70 pic that I took with very little knowledge of the Camera.

eskerlite
05-27-2007, 07:40 AM
I have a Nikon D70s and it has done very well for me. It has become the D80 now. Also look into the new D40 with 10 mp. $729.00 retail. Make sure it has a night landscape feature on it. Get the warranty in case you drop it. This will not be a small investment. Look at my website. All pics of lighting shot with my D70s.
Sean C.
www.dbcurraninc.com

Mike M
05-27-2007, 11:59 AM
Very nice, guys. I need to find a retailer.

It would be nice to have both a photo-based website and a physical album to bring with me.

Thanks,

Mike

Mike M
05-27-2007, 02:20 PM
What's the "night landscape" feature?

The D40 is much less expensive. I'd rather put my money in nice lenses, if possible. My main concern is tonal range more than anything, so the gray range shows up and not everything is white or black.

The pic's from those cameras are awesome.

Mike

NightScenes
05-28-2007, 11:16 AM
Along with a good camera, you will also want to pick up Photoshop CS. This software is incredible. You can probably pick it up on ebay for around $450. I use the "shadows/highlight" function more than anything (because I haven't taken the time to learn how to use this software).

High Performance Lighting
05-28-2007, 12:21 PM
Nikon D70, it paid for itself the first night out and it is super easy to use. I also think my Bogen Manfrotto 3175GN3 tripod helped just as much as anything. I heard the 3175 is no longer being made, I really questioned the need for such a tank, but I wouldn't take nothing for it now. I have attached my first D70 pic that I took with very little knowledge of the Camera.


Nice shot Eden, No hot spots , great exposure, excellent color rendition. Was this taken in "Night shot" mode or using manual or automatic settings?

Mike M
05-28-2007, 07:14 PM
I used that pic for my desktop background.

Paul, I'm still trying to decide if I should buy the software I need for ads and web designs now, or if I should wait a while and let the graphics guys do it for now.

I might get the Nikon 40, so I can at least started taking some usable pic's for me or for the graphics designers. I'd kill for the higher end stuff, but not yet. So far I put together a demo set with a 300 watt transformer, plus I did my own install with two transformers and lots of lights.

I also bought all the basic materials, tools, etc. (I just added that fancy spade from Gemplers with the footpads and a new pair of gloves, instead of a trencher/wire installer, lol).

I will pay for a separate logo design just for lighting, and probably just add the line in my body text "reliable full-service lawn care", etc.

It's tricky, I don't want to get ahead of myself, but I want to start off as professional as possible, with the right basic tools and materials.

Good news, my developer likes my full-service lawn care business and wants my name and service to appear for free in the community newsletter. This is when I need my camera ("here's some photo content for your newsletter," etc.).

Thanks,

Mike

Eden Lights
05-28-2007, 11:18 PM
Pic was only sharpened with the Nikon Capture software. The wind was blowing that night, this was about the only decent shot. I still use Aperture Priority for all may shots and let the camera control the exposure time. I bracket from F3.5 up to about the mid to upper teens. The shots that I always like are the low Fstops with the shorter exposures due to movement. I usually compromise a little depth of field for the clarity. Here are the settings from that shot. By the way, I always shoot Jpegs now because I don't have a powerful enough computer to play with the raw images, if I did I would still shoot in raw images.

Nikon D70
2004/11/29 18:05:44
RAW (12-bit)
Image Size: 1024 x 681
Lens: 18-70mm F/3.5-4.5 G
Focal Length: 18mm
Exposure Mode: Aperture Priority
Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern
10 sec - F/9
Exposure Comp.: 0 EV
Sensitivity: ISO 200
Optimize Image: Normal
White Balance: Incandescent
AF Mode: AF-C
Flash Sync Mode: Not Attached
Color Mode: Mode Ia (sRGB)
Tone Comp.: Auto
Hue Adjustment: 0°
Saturation: Normal
Sharpening: Auto
Image Comment:
Long Exposure NR: On

steveparrott
05-29-2007, 04:28 PM
Eden, perfect shot! Bravo!

If you're looking to get more tonal range, try longer exposures at higher f-stops. I usually shoot 20 to 30 secs. at f11 or f16.

To determine the proper exposure, I use manual setting and bracket from 1 1/2 stops below to 1 1/2 stops above the camera's indicator.

David Gretzmier
05-29-2007, 08:18 PM
Eden- Beautiful shot !

just for kicks I checked on ebay for the nikon d70s, it looks like they go from 500-800 bucks used, and usually there is a lense or two thrown in and a smallish ( 1gb or less) card.

I too need a good camera and am looking for one.

alas, all that is good, like landscape lighting, costs mucho $$$

Mike M
05-29-2007, 10:08 PM
Does anyone know if the 40 can be operated the same way (manual override) and with the same light sensitivity/f stops as the 80? I think the same lense comes standard. Tonal ranges should be similar?

I'll look at the spec's on line again, but they leave a lot of good stuff out.

Mike

Eden Lights
05-29-2007, 11:11 PM
I stopped at a old install and got some shots tonight, I only got a couple out of about 50 that I really liked. I moved around way to much to really get a good one. I wanted to see some different views and go back later for my favorite shots. Most of our trees have some dead in them from a super late freeze, so pics havn't looked good as of late.

Eden Lights
05-29-2007, 11:40 PM
A couple more pics

Eden Lights
05-29-2007, 11:42 PM
F9/30Seconds vs. F4.5/10 Seconds, Tell me your favorite? 1 or 2

Mike M
05-30-2007, 06:04 AM
The one on top, if anybody's noticing. Slightly better definition of the deck with the improved depth of field, also, what the heck are those dots? They show up less in the top pic, but they are in the same places.

Increbile photo's!

Mike

Mike M
05-30-2007, 06:18 AM
Dust on lense? Seems to be in same places in all pic's which needed increased light.

Eden Lights
05-30-2007, 08:26 AM
Noise, Artifacts, Hot Pixels, CCD Leakage, or you can call it whatever you want. For me it only rears it's head with very long exposures after the sky has gone very dark. As I stated earlier lower F stops keep the exposure times shorter resulting in better pictures for me.

You can Google (long exposure noise) and read all you want, I wish I knew more.

pcrispy
05-30-2007, 08:28 AM
Maybe you are referring to the stars in the sky?

steveparrott
05-31-2007, 04:36 PM
To demonstrate the extreme light sensitivity of the EOS 5D here's a photo of Snow Canyon (St. George, UT) shot under a full moon at 2 am.

That's about 1/100th of a footcandle!

Mike M
05-31-2007, 08:01 PM
Wow. You must have quite a flash on that thing.

:waving:

David Gretzmier
05-31-2007, 09:02 PM
eden- nice moonlighting on the bridge. I gotta get that camera.

we kinda need an ongoing thread called today's pictures, I never really get tired of looking at professional lighting pics. posting pic's maybe with a note- 2, 60 degree super flood 20 watt, 11.1 volts, etc, to show the effect and how achieved.

just a thought - dave g

Chris J
05-31-2007, 09:27 PM
eden- nice moonlighting on the bridge. I gotta get that camera.

we kinda need an ongoing thread called today's pictures, I never really get tired of looking at professional lighting pics. posting pic's maybe with a note- 2, 60 degree super flood 20 watt, 11.1 volts, etc, to show the effect and how achieved.

just a thought - dave g

Great thought David. I'd like to see that thread as well. Eden, Would you mind telling us what kind of fixture and lamp was used for the bridge? Height above? Any lenses?
Great shots and incredible craftsmanship. Your work is admirable.

High Performance Lighting
05-31-2007, 10:46 PM
To demonstrate the extreme light sensitivity of the EOS 5D here's a photo of Snow Canyon (St. George, UT) shot under a full moon at 2 am.

That's about 1/100th of a footcandle!


Steve looks like just me and you were sold on the 5D. pity isn't it. They'll never know what they're missing.

David Gretzmier
06-01-2007, 01:04 AM
canon eos 5d, on ebay, new and used running around 2000-2500 bucks.

REALLY nice camera. I can't afford it.

Eden Lights
06-01-2007, 02:02 AM
To demonstrate the extreme light sensitivity of the EOS 5D here's a photo of Snow Canyon (St. George, UT) shot under a full moon at 2 am.

That's about 1/100th of a footcandle!

Mr. Parrott can you please give us some more detailed information about this shot? Does the shot look like what your eye saw? I quess if I was in such a open area under a full moon it might look something like that? Is the sky blue in Utah under a full moon of 1/1000 FC? I guess what is odd to my eyes is there seems to be no difference of FC across the complete shot, but we all know that such a wide array of materials the precieved FC would be very different based on the reflectance of the different materials. Please at least copy and paste the camera settings and any editing of any kind that has been done?

ChampionLS
06-01-2007, 02:22 AM
Nice photos Steve.
Eden,
To help you out a little... and to put things in simple terms, the camera's shutter speed is set to a slower number, which keeps the picture exposing over a longer duration. In the daytime, this would give you a blurry waterfall and interesting effects. Used at night, it allows any ambient light to keep exposing the photo. A little moonlight turns into bright daytime! BUT... the camera does not see much detail... or as much detail with the correct amount of light, so some things may be fuzzy, or out of detail.

In any sense, you need a tripod, or you'll have light streaks all over. I use the auto timer on mine, because the slightest wiggle and the photo is shot.

To photograph good landscape lighting requires setting up the camera to reproduce what your eyes see. Lights should not look hot as fire, or dim as embers. Either variation can be achieved with a few setting changes.

High Performance Lighting
06-01-2007, 09:03 PM
Mr. Parrott can you please give us some more detailed information about this shot? Does the shot look like what your eye saw? I quess if I was in such a open area under a full moon it might look something like that? Is the sky blue in Utah under a full moon of 1/1000 FC? I guess what is odd to my eyes is there seems to be no difference of FC across the complete shot, but we all know that such a wide array of materials the precieved FC would be very different based on the reflectance of the different materials. Please at least copy and paste the camera settings and any editing of any kind that has been done?


Eden you've got a real chip on your shoulder. The guy is a very good photographer. Have you seen the photos on the Cast site? Photo shop assisted or not who cares they are great shots. His photography skills and his camera happens to be superior to yours. This coming from the guy who demands a definition of a proposal and a close. What's the deal .you don't like it unless you're the center of attention. Chill out huh and have some respect.

steveparrott
06-01-2007, 09:17 PM
More on my moonlight shot.

Camera settings:

ASA 100
F4.0
30 secs.
Color temp: about 5000K


Photoshop work:

Brightened the image a bit
Warmed up the color temp slightly
Used the lens correction filter on the raw image to correct for slight vignietting at the corners (due to setting my lens at full wide)


How it appeared to my eye:
It was barely bright enough for me to see the edge of the cliff where I stood. The sky did have a deep blue appearance near the horizon (as seen in the shot). The moon was behind me. The colors were barely perceptible and more subdued than the picture sees (probably due to the Purkinje effect). For some reason the image seemed brighter on my camera's preview screen than it did in Photoshop. I'm calling Canon on that to ask if the screen has a low light compensation.

By the way, Canon has an excellent technical service line. For those who want to explore some lower cost options, I suggest calling Canon, ask for a technical person and ask your questions. I was very impressed during one call when the person gave me a short course in achromatic lens coatings and their effects on picture quality.

Eden Lights
06-03-2007, 11:23 PM
Eden you've got a real chip on your shoulder. The guy is a very good photographer. Have you seen the photos on the Cast site? Photo shop assisted or not who cares they are great shots. His photography skills and his camera happens to be superior to yours. This coming from the guy who demands a definition of a proposal and a close. What's the deal .you don't like it unless you're the center of attention. Chill out huh and have some respect.

Mr. Parrot is an excellent photographer, I have read all his articles and studied all his pictures on the Cast site.

Did I make any comments or references toward Photo Shop?

I had no Idea my camera nor my skills were in a competition?

I have followed every inch of your website for years and I consider myself one of your biggest fans, Just as my questions of Mr. Parrot's photo came from a keen interest and desire to learn about his equipment and his excellent skillls, so did my questions (Not a demand) of your close. I was truly trying to learn from two men that I respect from afar in hopes that I could become better in my profession that is also my passion.

I consider myself very humble and I already had respect for you, so please don't make me loose it.

Eden Lights
06-03-2007, 11:34 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eden Lights
Can you please define and or explain "propose" Do you get a deposit, design contract, design fee, verbal commitment, project budget, or what? What do you mean by close?

Thanks for your reponse.

I think my hat was in my hand on this one, I was just trying to learn a little something.

Eden Lights
06-04-2007, 12:06 AM
More on my moonlight shot.

Camera settings:

ASA 100
F4.0
30 secs.
Color temp: about 5000K


Photoshop work:

Brightened the image a bit
Warmed up the color temp slightly
Used the lens correction filter on the raw image to correct for slight vignietting at the corners (due to setting my lens at full wide)


How it appeared to my eye:
It was barely bright enough for me to see the edge of the cliff where I stood. The sky did have a deep blue appearance near the horizon (as seen in the shot). The moon was behind me. The colors were barely perceptible and more subdued than the picture sees (probably due to the Purkinje effect). For some reason the image seemed brighter on my camera's preview screen than it did in Photoshop. I'm calling Canon on that to ask if the screen has a low light compensation.

By the way, Canon has an excellent technical service line. For those who want to explore some lower cost options, I suggest calling Canon, ask for a technical person and ask your questions. I was very impressed during one call when the person gave me a short course in achromatic lens coatings and their effects on picture quality.

Thanks for the great response, the information helps a ton. A little background on my questions, which by the way had nothing to do with Photo shop or any thing negative and everything to do improving my pictures. I went in about a month ago to upgrade my D70 to a new 10Meg Nikon and the guys at the shop tried to get me to take a 5d on loan to try out and I refused the offer. After I saw your shot, I started to wonder if I had made a mistake since in a Tennessee 2am shot you would never be able to gather that much light so uniform on the entire landscape. The sky would never show up as blue and etc. I needed the information of what you saw vs. the camera shot so I could get some information on it's ability to improve my pictures under my conditions. I plan to try out the 5D this week, but I would like to upgrade my computer hardware first and get back to shooting in RAW and upgrade with the next gen. Nikon D3 or next gen Canon. If the 5d really makes a difference I will make the switch. Thanks again.

High Performance Lighting
06-04-2007, 12:27 AM
Thanks for the great response, the information helps a ton. A little background on my questions, which by the way had nothing to do with Photo shop or any thing negative and everything to do improving my pictures. I went in about a month ago to upgrade my D70 to a new 10Meg Nikon and the guys at the shop tried to get me to take a 5d on loan to try out and I refused the offer. After I saw your shot, I started to wonder if I had made a mistake since in a Tennessee 2am shot you would never be able to gather that much light so uniform on the entire landscape. The sky would never show up as blue and etc. I needed the information of what you saw vs. the camera shot so I could get some information on it's ability to improve my pictures under my conditions. I plan to try out the 5D this week, but I would like to upgrade my computer hardware first and get back to shooting in RAW and upgrade with the next gen. Nikon D3 or next gen Canon. If the 5d really makes a difference I will make the switch. Thanks again.

Thanks for clearing things up. I thought you were trying to nail the guy and expose him for a fraud or something.

Eden Lights
06-05-2007, 12:13 AM
Great thought David. I'd like to see that thread as well. Eden, Would you mind telling us what kind of fixture and lamp was used for the bridge? Height above? Any lenses?
Great shots and incredible craftsmanship. Your work is admirable.

The down lights are: one right above the bridge, one left above steps that go down to the pool, and one on the back center of the tree on the planting material and lazy river that is part of an water fall feature outside of the shot.
There are also three MR16 Uplights around the tree at various locations. All down lights are FX Luminaire VL-20 lamped with the Phillips 20W 32 degree AR-11 lamp. All uplights are Kichler 15384's lamped with Sylvania Titan MR16 20 watt 40 degree lamps, This lamp has been replaced with a 35 Degree lamp with a cover glass as of the last couple of months. All uplights have hexcell louvers installed with clips to get the louver right against the lens. Down lights are installed just out of the picture in height.

Eden Lights
06-05-2007, 12:16 AM
Thanks for all the questions and comments.

NightLightingFX
06-05-2007, 12:19 PM
Hello all, whats-up Chris, Paul and other fellow AOLP members.
My name is Ned Hastings w/ Night Lighting FX. I am an artistic outdoor lighting professional in SE Washington State - Pasco WA (this is my 2nd year in the industry). I have been reading and following all the threads on this site for the past 6 mo. but I haven't got around to participating until now. I have a question re: photography. I heard the minimum you need to take good photos at night is a camara with "raw format." I currently have an olympus stylus 500 - doesn't have "raw format". At times this camera can take some good pictures - see my website www.nightlightingfx.com but a lot of times photos have too many hot spots which don't reflect the real portrait.
Do any of you have any suggestions on a low priced digital camera w/ "raw format?" thanks ~Ned

Chris J
06-05-2007, 12:26 PM
What's up Ned? Glad your finally speaking up. Sorry, I can't help you here. I'm photographically illiterate, but I'm sure you'll get the answers you need.

High Performance Lighting
06-05-2007, 08:56 PM
Hello all, whats-up Chris, Paul and other fellow AOLP members.
My name is Ned Hastings w/ Night Lighting FX. I am an artistic outdoor lighting professional in SE Washington State - Pasco WA (this is my 2nd year in the industry). I have been reading and following all the threads on this site for the past 6 mo. but I haven't got around to participating until now. I have a question re: photography. I heard the minimum you need to take good photos at night is a camara with "raw format." I currently have an olympus stylus 500 - doesn't have "raw format". At times this camera can take some good pictures - see my website www.nightlightingfx.com but a lot of times photos have too many hot spots which don't reflect the real portrait.
Do any of you have any suggestions on a low priced digital camera w/ "raw format?" thanks ~Ned

Ned, be more concerned with megapixels and the ability to interchange lenses and the overall quality and build of the camera.
Shooting raw is for very advanced photographers. The files are tremendous and you will have to have photo shop or equivalent and know how to use it in order to get the full effect of it. What price range are you looking at? You could probably pick up a Canon 20D for under $1,000. A good lens might cost the same. There are others using Nikons that are much less. I'm sure they will respond. There is a saying that it's not the camera it's the photographer that get's the quality shot. I half agree but if your tools are limited you will get limited results.

David Gretzmier
06-05-2007, 11:34 PM
Ned- Welcome !

I know this is off thread topic, but I took a look at your photo's on your website and I gotta ask- the 1st and third photo's of that commercial building- those are the narrowest spots I have ever seen. what are those? 1, 2 degree? at 3 stories high, those ramrod straight columns make for an interesting effect.

care to share your technique on that part of the install? watts? voltage, fixture and bulb? thanks and glad your adding to the mix here.

NightScenes
06-06-2007, 12:14 AM
Good to see you Ned!!

steveparrott
06-06-2007, 09:24 AM
Ned, to clarify the advantages of Raw format. Raw format is a file containing the raw data that comes from the digital camera's collector. Let me walk you through how use of the raw format is great for landscape lighting photos. (This is also a bit of a PhotoShop tutorial - a previous request.)

If a digital image is recorded in other formats (usually jpg or tif), the camera's electronics apply all sorts of changes to the raw data. These changes are meant to approximate color temperature, contrast, brightness and other factors. After these changes have been applied, any further changes in an image editing software such as PhotoShop will degrade the image significantly.

If you record the raw format, then the raw file is opened in a raw image editing program (PhotoShop has one built-in and cameras will come with one of these programs on disk). This program will allow you to change the color temperature, contrast, exposure, brightness and many other factors. Making changes at this stage does not degrade the image and gives you an exceptional selection of tools to improve your photos.

To give an example on how I sometimes use the raw image editing function: Let's start with an image with overly dark shadows and very bright highlights (Ned, you have many shots like this). I open the image in PhotoShop's Raw image editor and adjust the settings to lighten the shadows and reveal their details. This might burn out the bright areas of the photo but I don't care (as you'll soon see). I open the image with these changes in PhotoShop's regular editing space.

I then re-open the same raw image in the raw image editor. This time I adjust the settings so the bright areas look correctly exposed. I open this image in PhotoShop's edit space. Now I have both images open in PhotoShop, one with shadows that look good, the other with good looking highlights.

I click on the shadow optimized photo to bring it to the top. Then I mouse over to the layers panel. I click and hold on the photo's background layer and drag and drop it on the other (bright optimized) photo in the window. This gives me a new photo with two layers - the top layer optimized for the shadows, the bottom layer optimized for the bright areas.

Since the shadow optimized layer is at top (covering the bright optimized layer), that's the only one visible. The bright areas will look burned out. Using the eraser tool (set as a fairly small soft-edged brush with an opacity and flow of 25%) erase the overly bright areas with repeated strokes. This will reveal the underlying layer that has the correct exposure for those bright areas. This erasing method takes some practice so that erased edges are not visible.

The final photo has correctly exposed shadow and highlight areas. The result (starting from the raw image) is light years better than trying to lighten or darken areas in a tif or jpg image - the details in both light or dark areas will have been lost.

Even if you don't plan on doing the fancy photoshop stuff, the raw image adjusments will allow you to correct for any less than optimum settings from your shoots.

NightLightingFX
06-06-2007, 09:37 AM
Thanks for the input High Performance Lighting. It sounds like "raw format" is a little too complicated for me at this point. I think before I spend a small fortune in photography equipment I am going to take some photography classes. I was thinking that maybe there was a cheap simple camera out there with "raw format." Obviously I have a lot to learn.

NightLightingFX
06-06-2007, 09:41 AM
Steve:
What is the simplest/cheapest camera out there that has raw format. To use raw format do you need to have a lot of sophisticated equipment?
~Ned

Pro-Scapes
06-06-2007, 10:08 AM
Ned... We have a pentax ISTDL and it works well.... It does not have the depth that Steve or Mikes 5d cameras do but it cost about 500 bucks.

We are still green with night photography. This camera will shoot in raw format but we still have not mastered night time photography and Still working with it. Another member on here takes some really nice pictures with his istdl but it still seems like the 20d and 5d canons add a little more depth. It could be the scenes and photographers and the many years of experience they have with lighting pictures.

I really do suggest taking a class and also reading steves article on the cast site. Right now its still greek to me so I bought the dlsr phtography for dummies and will be going thru than and practicing alot this fall and winter when I slow down.

Attached is a photo we snapped at a job. I think its a tad overexposed ? the lights look a bit hot on the ground but still a nice looking photo I think

The only photoshop work was to smudge out a ladder that was leaning on the tree.

steveparrott
06-06-2007, 10:09 AM
Ned, sorry I don't have a recommendation (if you call Cannon, they might). But, aside from the raw capacity, it's also important to have the following:

- Ease of use at night (ie. lit display, easy to find and operate controls, large preview screen)

- Manual settings - none of the automatic settings will give good results

- good lens - most cameras come with mediocre lenses - Nikon and Cannon are best for this.

- shutter speed of at least 25 seconds

In answer to your question about requirements for use of raw images, the camera will come with the software. Your computer will need to have a fairly powerful hard drive since raw images have pretty hefty files sizes.

NightLightingFX
06-06-2007, 12:37 PM
David,
To answere your question on how I did the narrow beams, Those are just simple Par 36 35W well light fixtures with "GE VNSP" lamps at 11.3 volts. I believe they are 7* but don't quote me on it. If you want to get that narrow beam effect, you have to use Par 36 lamps. MR16 won't work, I know some contractors don't like Par 36 lamps, but trust me if you want that narrow pillar look 7* MR16 won't punch to the top of the building like the Par 36, plus it seemed like there was more "wash light?-what ever you want to call it" at the base of the beam with the MR16. I did a lot of experimenting. You have to make sure that they are GE "VNSP" not "NSP." Some dealers my think you want "NSP" and/or my not be familiar with "VNSP"
~Ned

Chris J
06-06-2007, 09:45 PM
I have a great Kodak Zoom with a really cool clear outer shell around it so you can take it under water. Cost me $12.95 You guys paid way to much for a camera. Check out the pictures at www.JohnsonLightingInc.com

Chris J
06-06-2007, 09:47 PM
:laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: By the way,

David Gretzmier
06-07-2007, 12:03 AM
ned- thanks for the answer- when I've used pars in the past it was always a more flood application and was looking for maximum wash or flood, and I always jumped to mr16's for narrow spots.

I've been away from pars for awhile ( although doing a current repair- on another thread ) and I might want to reproduce that ultra pinspot effect in the future. I might have to play with par wells in the future for that, but I hate that mulch inside the fixture thing. just my opinion.

SamIV
06-07-2007, 02:01 PM
Hey Billy,

Give yourself credit. Do you realize how much better that unprocessed shot looks comapared to most of what you see on this site. You are using a kit lens with a 6 megapixel camera. Don't bash yourself. Have a look at some of the sites posted here. I'll will try to post some picks if I can just figure out how.

I have the same set up as Billy but only use prime lenses, shoot manual mode and RAW format. As Steve described earlier the benefits of RAW, those of you who have DSLR's need to get on the RAW bandwagon.

SamIV

Pro-Scapes
06-07-2007, 07:01 PM
well its certainly been a huge step up from the point and shoots we were using. I still need to take some time to learn about editing in raw. Maybe you need to come up and go fishing with us sometime at ouor house or in meridian and we can spend a few hours on it.

If you want some pics up just email me them in either raw or jpeg and I can do it. All you gotta do is resize em then click manage attachments below your post when your creating it.