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oceanpotion
05-28-2007, 10:01 PM
Im trying to save money on my weed killer. When I first started working for a landscaper I remember that he would mix up some special potion into his spray pump. I think he may have used some kind of acid. I did a google search and found a recipe for 1 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon dish soap, 1 gal. vinegar. Unfortunately alot of the houses I service have orange/red bricks and I dont want to bleach the color using the vinegar. Is there something I can mix myself to use as an alternative to round up weed killer?

procut
05-28-2007, 11:20 PM
Salt water works, as long as you use a lot of salt. If you look around, there are lots of other non-selective herbicides out there that do the same thing as round up, but are a few bucks cheaper.

oceanpotion
05-29-2007, 11:20 AM
So basically what you are saying is use a lot of salt water.. that sounds like it will hurt the other plants.

MarcSmith
05-29-2007, 11:31 AM
so lets do the math here. on gallon of roundup or similar 41% glyphosate runs around 47 bucks... you will need to use 4 oz of roundup for every gallon of water....or about 1.48 worth of roundup....

the cheapest gallon of vinegar I found at safeway.com was a touch over 2 bucks.....

Just use roundup....provided you have the lic....if you don't have the lic, you cannot spray the home made brew for money either... but even so by using home brew chemicals you are costing yourself more money, plus more headache to mix all these these together and transport, ect...

Nosmo
05-29-2007, 12:57 PM
I use 4l% glyphosate at the rate of 3 Tablespoons per gallon of water and it works well for me. I buy the 2-1/2 gallon container on sale at TSC and it runs just under $50.00 including tax.

This figures $5.00 per quart and each quart makes about 21-1/3 gallons per quart. That is about 24 cents a gallon.

Nosmo

Turf Terror
05-29-2007, 01:41 PM
I saw a guy spraying weeds along a fence last week with some stuff that looked pale green. I guess it was colored so you could see where you sprayed it. Went by there today and everything was brown. Anybody know what that stuff was?

MarcSmith
05-29-2007, 03:01 PM
he could have added scythe (which makes the water white, and if he added dye a pale green)

I always hated the dye....

Lawnworks
05-29-2007, 05:34 PM
You can buy razor pro(41% glyphosate) off ebay. It is 5 gallons for $120 shipped to my house... that is approximately $24 per gallon. I am supposed to be getting a 50-55 gallon drum of round-up for about $400 from the guy I sub all my applications to.

SnDLawnCare
05-29-2007, 05:59 PM
Even if you use a home brew you still have to have a lic. Why it's not a chemical?Just curious

echeandia
05-29-2007, 06:34 PM
Salt water works, as long as you use a lot of salt.

Don't use salt. Nothing will be able to grow and you can't get the salt out of the ground.

MarcSmith
05-29-2007, 06:45 PM
Even if you use a home brew you still have to have a lic. Why it's not a chemical?Just curious

you are still applying pesticides for profit....(salt water, vingar, bleach, ect, they are all chemcials, and since you are using them to control a pest as such are considered pesticides)

florida is one of the toughest states on getting a full pest lic as well, but they do offer a "roundup" only lic...Ric knows more about this...

General Landscaping
05-30-2007, 04:50 PM
Commercial Landscape Maintenance Applicator Certification - The Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance Certification Program was designed to allow commercial landscape maintenance personnel to make pesticide applications (using herbicides, insecticides and fungicides, with a signal word of Caution) to ornamental plants and plant beds only. It does not allow landscape maintenance workers to make any kind of pesticide applications (including weed control and/or weed and feed products) to any turf areas. Furthermore, this certification does not allow or authorize the maintenance company or the certificate holder to supervise company employees under their certificate or operate a pest control business.

Beginning July 1, 2006 individuals who wish to make pesticide applications to plant beds and ornamentals no longer need to qualify for the Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance examination by providing proof that they have worked in the landscape industry for three (3) years. An application for the LCLM certificate is made to the Bureau and an exam admission slip is provided to the applicant provided they have obtained six (6) hours of Department approved plant bed and ornamental training. The applicant makes arrangements with the local County Extension Service office or an approved provider to take the Limited Commercial Landscape Maintenance examination. The exam is then graded in Tallahassee and certificates issued to applicants who successfully pass the examination.

Finally, an applicant seeking certification will have to provide proof of insurance which indicates that they or their employer meets the minimum financial responsibility requirements for bodily injury and property damage. Proof of insurance coverage must be provided prior to issuance of the certificate. Presently, these amounts are set at: Bodily injury: $100,000 each person and $300,000 each occurrence; and property damage $50,000 each occurrence and $100,000 in the aggregate; or combined single limit coverage of $400,000 in the aggregate.

Questions regarding this limited certification should be directed to the Bureau office at (850) 921-4177.


Here's where I got it. (http://www.flaes.org/aes-ent/licenseandcert.html)

PatriotLandscape
05-30-2007, 07:47 PM
you are still applying pesticides for profit....(salt water, vingar, bleach, ect, they are all chemcials, and since you are using them to control a pest as such are considered pesticides)

florida is one of the toughest states on getting a full pest lic as well, but they do offer a "roundup" only lic...Ric knows more about this...

The license is for fda approved registered pesticides a home remedy would not fall under this and would most likely be considered an organic.

However you could be in trouble for applying a product outside of it's intended use.

cantoo
05-30-2007, 09:59 PM
Here if it is used to kill something then you need a licence. Off your own property of course.

Runner
05-31-2007, 10:06 AM
Also, the fda has nothing to do with these pesticides. They are all regulated through the epa. If it is not registered through the epa - whether organic or not, it cannot be applied for hire. - Which brings us to some wording in terminology....I have seen some here word it "you cannot do it for money", and "you cannot do it for profit". Actually, the wording is "for hire". In other words, people cannot say "But I'm doing this part of the job for free.", or they can't say "But I'm not making a profit on it.". The fact is, if you are doing it as part of your task of a job, or as the only thing you do with the job at hand, then a license is required.

Ric
05-31-2007, 10:40 AM
oceanpotion

There are a lot of good answers in this thread that I don't need to repeat. The Bottom line is try and be as professional in your chosen field as possible. Get a license.

Contact your County Extension agent and get on his Mailing list for seminars. These Seminars are not only Cheap but will educate you so you can and will make more money. The County Extension Office also offers the Limited Pesticide License 6 hours of CEU's required to sit for the Limited Pesticide test. The Master Gardener Program is also a value learning tool and meets one morning each week. The Master Gardener program offers a certificate upon completion.