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Markf
06-04-2007, 07:47 PM
My son and I are considering buying a sprayer. I just got off the phone with the local Lesco rep. He stated that it may not be wise to buy used. The reason being is that if the prior owner ran Roundup through the system, there is nothing on the market that could clean out the Roundup and negative results could happen. He said that we should buy new for tick, fert, herbicide spraying and buy a second used sprayer for the Roundup. Does this make sense or is it a sales ploy? Thanks in advance.

Mark

indyturf
06-04-2007, 07:52 PM
I sprayed round up through mine several times with no problem. just rinsed it out with water.

mkroher
06-04-2007, 07:58 PM
can't use the tank for both tick and herbicide.. unless you want to clean the tank to go from one to the other.

Isn't round-up just a soluable salt? Surely it can be rinsed out?

Pilgrims' Pride
06-04-2007, 08:26 PM
I used a 300 gal lesco sprayer for years. I bought it used for a good price.
I sprayed EVERYTHING through it and never had a problem.
I used it for turf, weed & feed type apps, then cleaned it with lesco's cleaning product and then turned around and sprayed trees with it.
Never a problem.

americanlawn
06-04-2007, 08:30 PM
It's a sales ploy. Purge out what's in the unit & you will be fine. Also: nitrogen fert neutralizes Roundup. Also: "tank cleaner" works. We just double rinse & have never had a prob.

ampeg76
06-04-2007, 08:31 PM
i believe with glyphosate products a triple rinse is in order!

but in saying that, if you can afford a dedicated rig for non-selective herbicides, i would go that route:)

Runner
06-04-2007, 11:14 PM
My son and I are considering buying a sprayer. I just got off the phone with the local Lesco rep. He stated that it may not be wise to buy used. The reason being is that if the prior owner ran Roundup through the system, there is nothing on the market that could clean out the Roundup and negative results could happen. Mark

Gee, that is really ironic and unusual for Lesco to hire someone so ignorant and uneducated as a rep.. They usually do better than that when selecting employees. I'm glad you are on here, because I would otherwise suggest you go somewhere and ask someone who is knowledgeable on this. Obviously this "rep" has not a clue. I used a tank for years and made the transition back and forth. If the tank gets rinsed well, it is safe. There are several products out there including a product sold by Lesco called Nutra-sol. Even now, with my Perma-green, it is used for gly transitions.
First thing you need to understand, is that glyphosate (Roundup), was not developed as a non selective herbicide. It was originally invented and devised as a growth regulator. When gly is diluted down that much, it will NOT kill grass, weeds, etc.. It WILL slow the ****** the growth, and as a side effect, turns some of the vegetation a little yellow on top at times.
As long as enough water is ran through the tank and hose, the residue is so diluted down, that it has no effect. After you mix a new tank on top of that, you will see absolutely no effect. To be safe and to ensure the well being of the equipment, Nutrasol should be used.

Grandview
06-05-2007, 07:19 AM
I use my Permagreen and other sprayers for Roundup. I rinse the tank twice with water. Then run a couple gals of clean water through the hoses and nozzles. Never had a problem in 15 years. I do like to dedicate a backpack sprayer for Roundup just to avoid the clean out.

The Ranger
06-05-2007, 08:54 AM
I have sprayed RU out of my herbicide sprayer and then gone right back to regular herbicide. In fact, I had booth tanks hooked up to the same sprayer pump with seperate valves. When switching back from RU we would run the other mix through but by-pass it to the RU tank just to rinse the RU out of the lines. Never has a problem. That is bunk IMO.

Markf
07-04-2007, 08:13 AM
Thank you for your advice. I believe we will end up buying a new unit. Now the question is do I get a small separate trailer and permanently mount the unit there and pull it with the truck? This would alleviate the problem of mounting and dismounting the unit into the bed of the truck. I do not have a backhoe. I could rig something up using a 1 1/2 ton come-a-long, but the trailer sounds a lot simpler. What might be the down fall to the trailer? Has anyone run into a similar situation?

Thanks.

Happy Independence Day! :usflag:

Mark

carcrz
07-04-2007, 10:56 AM
The trailer is easier if you don't have to turn around or maneuver in tight areas. I have a trailer that I don't use any more because it was too hard to maneuver if in some of the areas I needed to get to. I have 2 ways to get the tank in now -- a swing-set type setup w/ a chain hoist & a loader w/ chains.

Green Dreams
07-04-2007, 11:19 AM
Typical LESCO krap. I cringe everytime I am forced to deal with them. Its sad too because they had great guys in the past.

I asked one roach for a little mechanical advice on one of their products. His reply?

"It's not in my job description."

I thanked him for doing me a favor and being in business.

F 'em is what I think.

pomticks
07-17-2007, 04:21 PM
We have 2 of Lesco's 200 gal compact sprayer in the back of pur truck. We built a stack of pallets on wheels wit hrug on the top as a docking station when we are not using them. We empty the tanks as much as we can and slide it right on our pallets. The pallets are the same height as the tailgate of the truck we don;t have to break a nut trying to get them in and out. Works great for us.....

MIke

storm-shadow
07-17-2007, 10:34 PM
My son and I are considering buying a sprayer. I just got off the phone with the local Lesco rep. He stated that it may not be wise to buy used. The reason being is that if the prior owner ran Roundup through the system, there is nothing on the market that could clean out the Roundup and negative results could happen. He said that we should buy new for tick, fert, herbicide spraying and buy a second used sprayer for the Roundup. Does this make sense or is it a sales ploy? Thanks in advance.

Mark

I have never had a problem with Glycosphate persisting in the spray tank of any sprayer, even if it did the AI level would be so low it I would find it hard to believe that any effect could be achieved. I believe Roundup now produces some products which contain additional AI's (I don't use them so I won't comment on their persistence in the tank). I would be more concerned about selective herbicide persistence, just smell the rinsed tank after spraying Trimec.
Lesco is staffed by people, unfortunately people make mistakes. I would say that the Lesco Rep. is misinformed with regards to Glycosphate persistence in spray tanks.:)

Regards,
Storm-shadow

boats47
07-18-2007, 04:24 PM
Look at mininsota wanner and realy think about a bean sprayer 300 gal split tank, they are worth the $ and you don't limit yourself. Bean is the superior pump in the bussiness and is very powerful, so if you wanted to get into trees or sell it later it will be worth something. Then but a little cheap 50gal for non-selective herbicide app and use the 300 as a nurse tank, it is not a good idea to use one tank for everything unless you know 100% it totally clean. Those non-selective herbicide can permiate into the tank and be very hard to clean, I would not risk it.

storm-shadow
07-19-2007, 02:47 PM
Accidentally posted this in another thread.:o

(Article from BYGL, September 02, 2004)
Link to page: http://hcs.osu.edu/bygl/bygl2004_22.html


AWARE OR SWEAR-SPRAY WOES

The last thing any spray applicator wants to hear is that plants are dying after a treatment was applied by their company. This is always a tricky situation because there are many reasons that plants can die, other than sprays, but most people don't want to hear them. Usually it goes like this, "The last person/company on the job killed it!"

One puzzling experience happened recently for a commercial applicator that illustrates the principle of always knowing what was in the tank. The company sprayed various properties on the day that this problem arose but only the first two properties sprayed showed evidence of spray damage. Several questions that come to mind after a situation comes to light include: What chemical was applied?; What was the temperature when the spray was applied?; What are the symptoms and patterns, if any, exhibited by the plants in question?; and Which plants are mainly affected (e.g. woody or herbaceous)?

In the case of the suspicious spray, the woody plants showed rapid twig death and the cambial tissue under the bark was dead. The spray patterns were evident in the plants, but some clues came while observing some of the herbaceous ornamentals that received some overspray. They exhibited the classic epinastic twist, characteristic of growth regulator herbicides. On the second property, some of the new growth that was breaking in the defoliated areas had the epinastic twist too. The spray applicator said that it was impossible to mix chemicals because the company had two tank trucks, and one applied herbicides and the other applied insecticides.

However, when checking back at the shop, one of the mechanics mentioned that the herbicide truck broke down one day. To not risk the chance of a leak, the herbicide was pumped into the empty insecticide tank and immediately pumped out ten minutes later at the shop. The tank was rinsed out but apparently the hose contents were forgotten! The first two properties received herbicide instead of insecticide. The best approach is to wait and see what will break bud and leaf out next spring and then assess the extent of the damage.

Some of the new surfactant packages in chemicals can cause these products to remain in spray tanks, in spite of triple rinsing. The best thing is to always keep chemicals separate but if you must mix, try rinsing out the tank, hose and pump with a diluted ammonia/water solution. It appears that ammonia can inactivate most agricultural chemicals.

I found the info regarding the "surfactant packages" causing the product to persist in the tank especially interesting, as I am seeing more products packaged this way.
Well any-hoot....... I thought this was an interesting situation. I wouldn't have thought the chem would run through the length of hose, must have removed the spray gun or left the boom valve open.

Regards,
Storm-shadow

bug-guy
07-26-2007, 05:35 PM
lesco-sol will help in cleaning a tank

Harley-D
07-27-2007, 10:44 AM
I've made the mistake in the past of warning someone of residue in the tank after a non-selective spray due to chemical bonding. Always suggest using seperate tanks anyway.

I don't believe there's any science behind any surfactants or actives bonding chemically to the tanks, is there? I probably should know but would never take that risk anyway so never bothered to find out.