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View Full Version : speedzone killed her bluegrass?


unit28
06-05-2007, 12:31 AM
Gotta check a lawn tomorrow.

It's been 2 weeks since I applied.

Rate was 1 oz per gal.
Temp was 80

4 gal and covered 3400 sq ft.

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She was having her sprinklers turned on for
the season 2 days after I applied.
I have no way of verifieng that.


I told her to irrigate it within 24hrs after I applied.

And it was written on my application sheet which includes all pertinant info.

We'll see.

bug-guy
06-05-2007, 03:25 AM
u used speedzone red label??your rate looks good

RigglePLC
06-05-2007, 08:06 AM
Repeating myself. I used Surge (which is similar to Speedzone), on a spot in my own yard. Label rate, double and triple as a test. No effect at first. Then it killed the moss, but at the highest rate, slowly killed the bluegrass too.

DUSTYCEDAR
06-05-2007, 11:47 AM
if it was real dry it could burn the grass

unit28
06-05-2007, 04:40 PM
It was dry and warm, 2 weeks prior to me spraying.

Then the temps dropped back down and rained a lot after I sprayed.

I checked the yard today and noted two dead spots, far apart from each other. 8" in diameter

I'm guessing a fungus or insect damage..

I'm leaning more towards fungus.

Both spots were in very sunny areas where the turf is more compacted.
Overall health was very good.
--------------------------------

As far as the spraying job, it did some damage to the creeping charlie but not enough. I did see some very ill dandis that looked almost black!
So I sprayed again today and bumped up at about 1.85oz per gal. Temps 74
2mph ne wind.

I told her not to water until 48 hours instead of the 24 and,.....
I think she had her lawn mowed the day after I sprayed last time so I told her to hold off the service for two days and turn the sprinklers back on in 2 days.

DUSTYCEDAR
06-05-2007, 08:09 PM
thats great it came back i have had some phototox on some hot days when its dry but rain always makes it better
a little sz goes a long way

americanlawn
06-05-2007, 11:04 PM
unit -- 1.1 oz per 1000 is quite accurate. I'm guessing you know your stuff. Keep up the good work & keep in mind that "oddball customers" are a challenge for all of us. We dump 'em...hope you do the same. Good luck man, and God bless -- too many customers consider "lawn guys" as just another n$gger they can deposit their life's disappointments on. We promptly cancel these types, cuz there's lots of other "good people" out there.

Ric
06-06-2007, 01:00 AM
It was dry and warm, 2 weeks prior to me spraying.

Then the temps dropped back down and rained a lot after I sprayed.

I checked the yard today and noted two dead spots, far apart from each other. 8" in diameter

I'm guessing a fungus or insect damage..

I'm leaning more towards fungus.

Both spots were in very sunny areas where the turf is more compacted.
Overall health was very good.
--------------------------------

As far as the spraying job, it did some damage to the creeping charlie but not enough. I did see some very ill dandis that looked almost black!
So I sprayed again today and bumped up at about 1.85oz per gal. Temps 74
2mph ne wind.

I told her not to water until 48 hours instead of the 24 and,.....
I think she had her lawn mowed the day after I sprayed last time so I told her to hold off the service for two days and turn the sprinklers back on in 2 days.


28

I don't work on Blue Grass or really know a whole lot about it. However all Herbicides cause stress to desirable turf and from your own statement it sounds like you applied to stressed turf. BTW most herbicides will be absorbed by the leaf in 2 hours. Watering 48 hours later only help to stress the turf even more IMHO.

hughmcjr
06-06-2007, 01:46 AM
1 oz per gallon is on the light side. In fact almost half of the recommmended rate for cool season grasses that I have used it on like rye or bent. I wouldn't get any clover kill and poor weed kill at 1 oz a gallon. The fact you covered the area with more than a gallon of mixed product per 1000 sq ft, might have helped the kill. That said, being dry for a long period and not being watered in could cause damage.

RigglePLC
06-06-2007, 08:29 AM
Unit,
You used one ounce per gallon. However you left out some important information. How much water per 1000 sq ft? Spot spray or broadcast? Backpack or skid sprayer? PG? Is there a dead weed in the center of each spot?

That said--fungus is a high possibility--red thread or dollarspot come to mind. Consider dogspot also.

unit28
06-06-2007, 10:50 AM
Ok monkeys ...LOL
listen up. She made a comment the spray killed her bluegrass.
I checked it out yesterday and the lawn wasn't damaged. It was a poor guess on my part by saying it was a possible fungus[see above post] in those two -8" diamater spots. I know know it's a ztr mower turn tear.
I also stated the lawn was in great health.

Which it didn't rebound to from being sprayed improperly.

The lady also said her mowing crew came in the next day. So I feel that's where the tears are coming from.
--------------------------

When I went to spray the first time,
the lawn was stressed.

I sprayed on the lighter side of the recommended ratio.
Given a ratio of 1 oz per gallon being the extremem light side, then covered an additional pass with the left over of the mix which might be around 1.3 oz.

Even that is on the light side, which I know would not be detrimental to the turf becsuse of the temps going down rapidly from 80 to 50 that night and then watering the next day.

1.8 is the recommended ratio from my lesco rep, and label.... given the temps do not exceed 85.

This is a trustworthy client and I trust her to give me some help as I am doing her a job that I put honor into.

She told me when her mowing crew will be there etc. and we talked about what we're trying to acheive...we're cool like that.

We use BP lesco calibrated to 1 gal per th.
once again, label says the high end is 1.8, low end being 1.1

The first time out was general broadcast over thin turff and adult dandies,
the creeping charlie and wild violets were just starting.

Now the dandies are toasted and the others are most prominent. Some with edge burn on the leaves, well then there's clover that showed up as well.

I slowed the pace down and pegged them more direct with an exact ratio
recommended for killing them dead. wetting the target more effectivly.

hughmcjr
06-06-2007, 02:35 PM
Unit,
You used one ounce per gallon. However you left out some important information. How much water per 1000 sq ft? Spot spray or broadcast? Backpack or skid sprayer? PG? Is there a dead weed in the center of each spot?

That said--fungus is a high possibility--red thread or dollarspot come to mind. Consider dogspot also.

Read the OP he did give the info.

teeca
06-06-2007, 02:46 PM
not sure of your temps their, but i will say using an ester formulation (like speedzone and others) you need to forcast temps for several days. it might only be 70 on monday when you spray, but 90 on wednesday could cause your turf and more so the onamentals problems.

unit28
06-06-2007, 04:22 PM
not sure of your temps their, but i will say using an ester formulation (like speedzone and others) you need to forcast temps for several days. it might only be 70 on monday when you spray, but 90 on wednesday could cause your turf and more so the onamentals problems.

If it were to sit there without additional irrigation, I would agree.
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label says not to apply, when temps are 90 and up.

I mean for one thing it has a residual value of .002%
It's highly selective, and reseeding can occure within 2 weeks.
Highly selective means what?

It also doesn't say when to irrigate, but does say when to mow.

When the product is applied, the temps only affect the plants uptake of the product at the rate applied until additional h20 is applied. That's just like adding water to the mix...NO?

Since there are hard to control weeds...creeping charlie and wild violets I will let the product sit for 48 hours.

SO, the only need to be concerened about temps are in-between application and the next irrigation time, no more than that.

Maybe I'm wrong?

teeca
06-06-2007, 09:23 PM
read the lable (better), watering instruction are listed under 'cultural tips for improved control'.

as far as temp only effecting the plants uptake??? 2 proplems with this, first you should not be spraying creaping charlie now anyway, its not activly feeding this time of year from the leaf, but rather the roots. that's why it's sprayed in the fall. second, spraying in high temp can cause transpiring iin the plant, which will cause the chemical to volitiz and can damage surrounding ornamentals and the plant it's self. i know the lable says up to 90, but if you spray when it's that hot.. you got everything comming to you you diserve. i won't even spray 'amine' when it gets above 85. irrigated lawns are still if'y. jmo

unit28
06-06-2007, 10:27 PM
ty, found it right above the mowing.

unit28
06-06-2007, 10:45 PM
transpiring, or evapotranspiration?

I still beg to differ on your opine, being that temps several days after
applications are still effective after irrigation. The product is highly selective, what does that mean?

Dilution demineshes the product, plus the kill should start within hours.
The hard ones to control in my opine will be suseptable to
the product lingering until irrigation. As per label, drought makes some harder to control.

whence the re-introduction of irrigation, narry a blade be
incopacitated.

maybe I am b wrong.

As I also said, the temps during the products visit to their host,
temps were in the recommended range.

teeca
06-07-2007, 12:21 AM
transpiring, or evapotranspiration? could be both

The product is highly selective, what does that mean? that it kills/controls a selective plant, to wit; dicot, monocot type weeds, etc.. not everything it touches.

As I also said, the temps during the products visit to their host,
temps were in the recommended range. but if the plant isn't activly growing, then it can't/very hard to kill

if you read the lables on other weed control products, they all say 'selective' or 'highly selective' i've tried speedzone, works good, but for the price and the amount of coverage, i chose to use 'coolpower' ya, i can't spray it at 90, but i've been doing this long enough that i know when to and when not to spray (lable say's 80).. common sense for the most part.

if you have a good relation with your customer like you had said, then you should just have told her that you would be back in the fall and kill the creeping charlie for good. that would be the responsable thing to do following a good IPM, but i don't know your climate, but i deal with cool season grass/weeds, and that is the advise from many university's both north and south.

good luck

unit28
06-07-2007, 09:32 AM
yes, the responsible thang to do.
1st off your trying to Insinuate I didn't do the right thang.

My ratios at first were on the extremee low side.
Consider why I did that. The explanation purely is that the lawn was already stressed, and hence the dandies present I knew the lower ratio would not be detrimental to either the lawn or the drought hardened weeds. Dandies were burnt after applying.

Next we can look at why you're saying, the future temps several days after
applying are going to be detrimental to ornamentals including the turf.
If that were the case then the whole friggen planet earth would be dying from my application, through evapotrans and transpiration.
Well le's see here 3400 sq ft of applied product just simply vanishes out into the atmosphere through et and killed the neighbors hostas 2 counties over.

Through high concentration of target selectivity shall we be more inclined to be less cautious about how we apply..um no.
It simply means your other desirables are not suseptable to damage [I'm not saying not to follow the guidelines], as long as the guidelins are followed.
Now don't go spraying the trees and **** cuz you took this wrong.

And once again you would like to incinuate that the timing is way off for killing creeping charlie. What gives you the knowledge to dictate that?
I'm basing your expertise on a seasonal timing for applications, which is good, but Just because June 5 rolled around doesn't mean I can't control this stuff where I'm located. Well, until It just puts it's little hoodie on.

There is some timing issues with this and any other weeds, we'll agree on that.

Chemical control:
• Resistant to 2,4-D; Repeat treatments of 2,4-D + mecoprop + dicamba in turf. Optimum timing is early June or September.

teeca
06-07-2007, 06:06 PM
ok, like i had said.. go luck if it works for you, then so be it.