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Lohse's Lawn Service
06-07-2007, 06:48 PM
Right now, I'm pulling my enclosed trailer with most all my equipment and it weights approximately 10,000 lbs. I'm pulling it with a '92 Chevy 1/2 ton. I'm looking to expand to a bigger vehicle very soon, but before I go out and spend money on a used vehicle, I want to make sure I get the right one. For pulling 10,000 lbs. in town for the most part, would it be a better choice to buy the 3/4 ton or the 1 ton? Thanks in advance to any advice you guys give out.

milsaps118
06-07-2007, 06:57 PM
Get a 1 Ton. Some guys don't need one and a 3/4T does 'em just fine, but if I had your trailer loaded with some of your equipment I def want a 1 T.

GreenT
06-07-2007, 07:02 PM
Right now, I'm pulling my enclosed trailer with most all my equipment and it weights approximately 10,000 lbs.

From a safety/ performance perspective, you have no choice but to get a 1 ton truck.

fiveoboy01
06-07-2007, 07:13 PM
From a safety/ performance perspective, you have no choice but to get a 1 ton truck.

Um, NO. He doesn't HAVE to have a one ton.

Example - my F-250 is rated to be able to tow 12,100#. This is with the smallest engine, the 300 HP 5.4.

The brake size is identical on the F250/F350. Most would agree that stopping power is more important than "go" power, so 3/4 vs. 1-ton is a wash when it comes to a safety standpoint.

The 250/350 are going to have similar gross hauling capacity, with the 350 having slightly more. The engine choice is just as much of a factor for towing. Of course, the diesel can pull much more weight. But even it has the same size brakes.

Main difference between the two is the springs for more weight capacity, and that's about it.

KTO Enterprises
06-07-2007, 08:14 PM
i would recommend a 1 ton dually. Problem with 3/4 ton trucks is the single rear tire. How in the world do you have 10,000# of trailer and equipment behind you anyways.

I have a 36ft haulmark elite II race trailer. Curb weight unloaded is 5,900#
that would mean I would have to put 4 scag tiger cubs in it to get to 10,000#.

a 24 foot trailer with 2 ZTRs, a parking lot blower, 2 backpacks, 2 trimmers, edgers and hedgers and tools to work on everything would probably only weigh 7,200 lbs. That 1/2 ton truck would have long ago bent the frame trying to pull 10,000 lbs.

KTO Enterprises
06-07-2007, 08:18 PM
Of course, the diesel can pull much more weight. But even it has the same size brakes.


Diesel trucks have bigger brakes. A dually f350 has bigger brakes that a single rear wheel f350. Thats why the front rim on a dually sticks out like it does is because the brake rotor is huge. I can stop my fully loaded race hauler without trailer brakes. (found out by accident. trailer plug came out.)

DiyDave
06-07-2007, 08:22 PM
Don't register it over 10,000lbs. That way you don't have to stop at the chicken coops along the highway!:waving:

Lohse's Lawn Service
06-07-2007, 08:57 PM
i would recommend a 1 ton dually. Problem with 3/4 ton trucks is the single rear tire. How in the world do you have 10,000# of trailer and equipment behind you anyways.

I have a 36ft haulmark elite II race trailer. Curb weight unloaded is 5,900#
that would mean I would have to put 4 scag tiger cubs in it to get to 10,000#.

a 24 foot trailer with 2 ZTRs, a parking lot blower, 2 backpacks, 2 trimmers, edgers and hedgers and tools to work on everything would probably only weigh 7,200 lbs. That 1/2 ton truck would have long ago bent the frame trying to pull 10,000 lbs.

My trailer weight (empty) is 4,050 lbs. A 60" Exmark weighs app. 1140 lbs., and I have 2 of those on my trailer. That's already about 6330 lbs., and that's not including my 2 Toro 32" walk-behinds, 21" Toro w/b (that's baby weight) and 3 weed-trimmers, 2 blowers, hedge-trimmer, chains, rakes, tools, spare tire, etc.

Surely, that weighs over your approximated 7,200 lbs. and probably more towards my 10,000 lbs. Don't you think so? Regardless, I know I need a heavy-duty truck, that's the point of this thread.

Bigray
06-07-2007, 09:03 PM
IMO, get a one ton to pull that kind of weight preferrbly a diesel too.
as KTO and I can attest too w/ our racing trl's... bigger is better, so the wife says.

KTO Enterprises
06-07-2007, 09:04 PM
regardless I would go with a dually. I still cant count more than 7800 lbs. A mid to late ninetys ford F350 will run around $10,000 for a Diesel dually in good condition. Will get years of use out these trucks. I just bought a 1997 F350 with the 7.3 diesel back in january. had 133,000 on the odometer and I paid 9,500 for it. very clean truck.

I have a 1996 F350 with the gas 460 that I have had since 2003. Has been all over the south east pulling heavy loads. It has 235,000 and counting, starts daily and works like an old mule. It stays hooked to the landscape trailer now a,d does the dirty work. My newer truck pulls the tractor and race car trailer now.

Lohse's Lawn Service
06-07-2007, 09:13 PM
KTO Enterprises, you make a convincing case for me to look for a 1 ton dually. I'll keep my eyes open for one and I appreciate the help.

fiveoboy01
06-07-2007, 09:14 PM
Diesel trucks have bigger brakes. A dually f350 has bigger brakes that a single rear wheel f350. Thats why the front rim on a dually sticks out like it does is because the brake rotor is huge. I can stop my fully loaded race hauler without trailer brakes. (found out by accident. trailer plug came out.)

Not according to Ford's website:

F250/350, 13.66" front rotors and 13.39" rear rotors.

F-450, 14.53" front, 15.35" rear.

They make no differentiation between diesel and non-diesel trucks. I can tell you that an '06 SRW F-250 6.0 has the same size brakes all around as my truck despite the diesel engine.

Of course this is for the current model year('08), it doesn't give specific brake sizes for the '07s and older so I don't know about those.

KTO Enterprises
06-07-2007, 09:17 PM
I would believe new trucks coming with the same size brakes. Reduce the number of different parts to be manufactured. It also makes the lighter trucks that much safer. I had never researched new trucks. Dont want to pay that much money. lol Older trucks the dually has a dished front wheel (basically the same as the back wheel just turned around to accomodate the bigger rotor.

fiveoboy01
06-07-2007, 09:21 PM
KTO Enterprises, you make a convincing case for me to look for a 1 ton dually. I'll keep my eyes open for one and I appreciate the help.

I'm not trying to argue but I don't see how his case is convincing.

Duallies have their place and definitely offer more stability, but in my opinion they're un-necessary for hauling a 10K# trailer. And from what you've listed as far as equipment, I think you're closer to 8000-8500#, not 10K.

I've pulled an S250(around 8,000#) with at least a ton of dirt on the trailer and the trailer itself was probably 2500# or so.

No stability problems, trailer had good brakes and the whole thing stopped fine. Pulling power was nothing to write home about though:laugh:

Either way it's your choice, but I think either would work fine.

fiveoboy01
06-07-2007, 09:23 PM
I would believe new trucks coming with the same size brakes. Reduce the number of different parts to be manufactured. It also makes the lighter trucks that much safer. I had never researched new trucks. Dont want to pay that much money. lol Older trucks the dually has a dished front wheel (basically the same as the back wheel just turned around to accomodate the bigger rotor.


Have you actually measured the rotors on a DRW 350 versus a SRW 350? Not pissing at you, just wondering if it's correct. I can see the difference in the wheel, but perhaps that's just to accomodate a larger caliper and not a larger rotor. I wish I could find the specs now cause I'm curious.

KTO Enterprises
06-07-2007, 09:23 PM
I just rather go over kill in this biz sometimes. if you have the truck you know you can pull more if you have to. Leaves more room for expansion.

KTO Enterprises
06-07-2007, 09:30 PM
Have you actually measured the rotors on a DRW 350 versus a SRW 350? Not pissing at you, just wondering if it's correct. I can see the difference in the wheel, but perhaps that's just to accomodate a larger caliper and not a larger rotor. I wish I could find the specs now cause I'm curious.

I know that the rotor on a DRW is specific to a drw truck, because the rotor extension(where the wheel bolts to) is made to the rotor. And those S.O.B.'s aint cheap. the are also thicker. minimum diameter tolerance on a SRW is just over 1.25 inches. min rotor thickness tolerance on a DRW is 1.895 inches.

lawnmaniac883
06-07-2007, 09:32 PM
Get a 1 ton dually, they are more stable when pulling trailers than an srw. Also you get more surface area on the back tires to stop the load. Diesel vs gas ... diesels use hydroboost systems instead of vacuum pumps on the brakes, hydroboost systems run by utilizing the power steering pump as an assist in braking force. They run higher pressures than a traditional vacuum pump system and therefore provide better braking.

Fairway Land & Lawn
06-07-2007, 09:36 PM
[QUOTE=Lohse's Lawn Service;1856070] For pulling 10,000 lbs. in town for the most part, would it be a better choice to buy the 3/4 ton or the 1 ton? QUOTE]

Sure I would say go with a 1 ton. Doesnt really have to be a dually though. Being that most of your driving is around town I wouldnt spend the extra money on the dually. The only reason for buying the dually is for long interstate hauls, because of the added stability. The single rear wheel will pull just as much weight, it will just carry less in the bed. If you had a gooseneck or 5th wheel trailer, then dually all the way. IMHO the dually is just a bear to drive around town, and park without the trailer hooked. 1ton, SRW all the way...

KTO Enterprises
06-07-2007, 09:38 PM
[QUOTE=Lohse's Lawn Service;1856070] For pulling 10,000 lbs. in town for the most part, would it be a better choice to buy the 3/4 ton or the 1 ton? QUOTE]

IMHO the dually is just a bear to drive around town, and park without the trailer hooked. 1ton, SRW all the way...

Too true. I dont park anywhere I cant use 2 spots. Not that i cant get in one spot, I have just been blocked in too many times by people that park too close to me. I also have crew cabs and longbeds. Real fun to get through some drive throughs if i can get through them at all.

fiveoboy01
06-07-2007, 09:41 PM
Also your rear end will hurt when it comes time to put new tires on the dually:)

KTO Enterprises
06-07-2007, 09:46 PM
Also your rear end will hurt when it comes time to put new tires on the dually:)

THATS THE TRUTH. Its about a grand for tires for my truck. Another down point to duallys is you cant rotate the tires from front to back. Owners manual says not to rotate tires. Run chance of mismatched diameter tiers on the rear, causing problems. The I beam front suspension also wears tires funny on the front. the outer edge seems to wear first. I can only get about 30,000 out of a set of shoes.

STRINGALATION
06-07-2007, 10:19 PM
hey we got the same manager how cool

i dont know alot but how about smaller second trailor and second truck all those mowers you need two crews

lawnMaster5000
06-07-2007, 10:39 PM
While we are on this topic, a question I have often wondered.

I pull about 7,000# daily for a total of about 20,000K miles a year. I am experiencing extreme tire wear and am wondering will a dually be more or less expensive to drive than my SRW truck. I don't like buying new tires every year.

Sure the dually costs more to replace the 6 tires, but do they wear away as fast since there is so much more rubber on the road? Will the tires last enough longer to pay for the extra two tires?

My constant stop and go driving just destroys tires both on the truck and trailer.

And to answer the original question - depending on what is said here in response to my question.
I am perfectly comfortable pulling 10K# behind my truck which is a GM 2500HD. I don't see the need for the 1 ton dually unless i was driving highway all day, and then it would just be to eliminate the sway.

ed2hess
06-08-2007, 05:33 PM
I think I would take a look at whether I needed to pull all that equipment around......gas is getting expensive and I would guess a 1 Ton truck will eat it and it will cost a big bunch to purchase....We got rid of our F350 and our F250 ..no more 6 mpg. And you can put brakes on all wheels on a trailer and stop it just fine with practically any size truck...cost $300.

Lohse's Lawn Service
06-08-2007, 06:47 PM
I think I would take a look at whether I needed to pull all that equipment around......gas is getting expensive and I would guess a 1 Ton truck will eat it and it will cost a big bunch to purchase....We got rid of our F350 and our F250 ..no more 6 mpg. And you can put brakes on all wheels on a trailer and stop it just fine with practically any size truck...cost $300.

Trust me, I've taken a considerably long look at if I need all the equipment...it is a must. I'm not only mowing normal, residential yards, but I have several yards out in the country and they are my better paying jobs. I'm not driving out there with just one ExMark. I don't like going to any job without a back-up mower. Now I've got everything I need without wasting all that gas going back and forth to the house to pick up/drop off equipment. And I must say the trailer brakes you speak of work great. Especially when the roads are wet. Were you really only getting 6 mpg on the F250? I'm getting about 10-12 in my 1/2 ton.

Lohse's Lawn Service
06-08-2007, 06:49 PM
hey we got the same manager how cool

i dont know alot but how about smaller second trailor and second truck all those mowers you need two crews

Glad to know we have the same manager.

I wouldn't consider myself big enough to get a second trailer and second truck. Not yet. I do have a 16" trailer, but I've stepped up to my enclosed one this year. My 2 employees and myself are able to handle the 65-70 yards we have.