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bluetick
06-08-2007, 10:39 PM
I have a St. Augustine and have been geting rains almost daily. I don't know if I have gray leaf spot or the begining of brown patch. Any way it is most likely a fungis of some sort. Any suggestions?

I also picked up a new account and mowed it for the second time today. It is cenipede. It looked like a healthy lawn but today when I showed up to mow it there where streaks in the yard from where the tires on the mower ran across the the grass. Kind of redish to brown in color. Not real bad but noticable. I think it is also a fungis maybe caused from the mower compacting the soil? Whats the answer? Or is this even the problem. There is no doubt it is showing signs of fungis in other places also. It too is getting lots of evening showers high temps and hunidity. You know, great Louisiana wheather. Any help would be greatly appriciated.

God Bless
Shawn

sildoc
06-09-2007, 12:08 AM
Not sure about warm season grasses but when We have a sprinkler not hitting right and we drive across it is really noticeable where the tires went, especially with a red thread break out. Have you ferted lately? is your irrgation right? check the obvious first then post some pics so we can better help. hard to tell with writing what it is.

Grits
06-09-2007, 12:24 AM
I don't know what causes it, but centipede turns a different color where your tires run. I think all the centipede does it to a certain extent, but some more than others. I don't think it is a problem, but I could be wrong.

Brown patch is a big problem with St Augustine. If you can post some pics it would be easier to diagnose.

Envy Lawn Service
06-09-2007, 12:40 AM
I hate to tell you this.....

But if you are cutting fungus at one place, you can transport it and infect another place.

Grits
06-09-2007, 12:43 AM
I hate to tell you this.....

But if you are cutting fungus at one place, you can transport it and infect another place.

ABSOLUTELY!!!
I made the mistake of scraping my mower deck in my front yard. Then I was lazy and left the clumps there for a day or two......now I have dollar spot on my St Augustine! I am treating it so it shouldn't be a problem. But you have to think about these things when going from yard to yard. Good point Envy!

Envy Lawn Service
06-09-2007, 01:01 AM
Yep... funny but not funny story...

A few years ago I was invited to bid on a big new Lowes location.
Everything freshly done.

I got blew out pretty bad on the bid by a newbie.

Well, it was a wet year that year and fungus started breaking out in a lot of places. Well, it was not to the point yet where this Lowes location would have been effected. But not knowing any better, this newbie tracked it in from somewhere else. It started out right where he parked and first hit the grass.

Then it just kept spreading and spreading. He had a Gravely 260Z with that stripe flap thing that gravely has for the back of the deck. Over time, he effectively brushed it across every bit of the turf.

In the past, fungus had not been an issue to speak of, other than brown patch once in a while. Nobody had a clue what was happening. In the end, the entire turf area was a complete total loss. I mean every bit of it got infected and died out from fungus.

sheshovel
06-09-2007, 01:05 AM
You bet, you can spread it from place to place with your equipment and with your shoes. Disinfect with Lysol before and after every cut.

txgrassguy
06-09-2007, 07:42 AM
Most of the climatic conditions you mention are classic physiological symptoms for some type of soil borne pathogen.
However, with out an accurate photograph I cannot say for certain yet what you have occurring is a classic outbreak of Pythium.
At this time I do not think your soil temperatures are high enough, at a sustained level, to support any Rhizoctonia spp unless there exists underlying physical problems that has already stressed the turf.

Grits
06-09-2007, 09:51 AM
Most of the climatic conditions you mention are classic physiological symptoms for some type of soil borne pathogen.
However, with out an accurate photograph I cannot say for certain yet what you have occurring is a classic outbreak of Pythium.
At this time I do not think your soil temperatures are high enough, at a sustained level, to support any Rhizoctonia spp unless there exists underlying physical problems that has already stressed the turf.

In English please!:laugh:

Paradise Yard Service
06-09-2007, 12:10 PM
Augustine has few if any 'fungus' issues. Only one I know of is SAD virus, and I've never come accross it in Hawaii.
I would look to see if its Chinch. Cut the bottom off of coffee can push it down on the dead/yellow spot and fill with water. If lots of little black kritters (esp with little wings) float to the top in a few minutes you got Chinch. If its Chinch you got to get busy. Takes 14 days minimum to get under control. Need to kill the Nymphs or they will be back. And they thrive in HOT araes of the lawn.
Without a pic we are all just taking stabs at your situation.

Aloha

Grits
06-09-2007, 02:00 PM
[B]Augustine has few if any 'fungus' issues.

Aloha

Good point. It can be easy to think of them as one in the same (fungus and disease).
On St. Augustine the main diseases it will get is leaf spot and Brown Patch. The conditions that the original poster are experiencing is very favorable conditions for brown patch to thrive. Excessive water, high humidity....also thatch and overfertilizing will also contribute to the problem. Centipede is also susceptible to this disease.
They are both diseases and not fungus but it seems most peole refer to them as fungus. Either way they can be a pain in the butt!:)

puppypaws
06-09-2007, 04:42 PM
In English please!:laugh:

It is nothing but fungi, (plural of fungus) we get it in soybeans also.

You talking about something that will blow your mind, you should see Fairy Ring Fungus.
You see it a lot on golf course fairways with bermuda grass, it will make a perfect circle with everything in the center perfectly green and the ring may be a foot or so wide and dead. You will see different size circles all over the golf course.



fun·gus [ fúng gəss ] (plural fun·gi [ fún j, fúng g ] or fun·gus·es)


noun

Definition:

spore-producing organism: a single-celled or multicellular organism without chlorophyll that reproduces by spores and lives by absorbing nutrients from organic matter. Fungi include mildews, molds, mushrooms, rusts, smuts, and yeasts.

bluetick
06-10-2007, 07:11 PM
Here are some pics (I hope). I took some samples to a local garden mart/ nursery and they said it was a fungi. Now it sounds like we may be getting a little to technical for me. ;) (I is slow some time) When you say the grass does not get the fungi I think I understand. The dirt has the fungi and the grass catches a virus. But that s kinda like saying the man died of pneumonia but he had AIDS. Is this not kinda what were talking about.

Any way they gave me Hy-Yield PBNC fungicide. Will this help?
Thanks and God Bless
Shawn


http://www.imagestation.com/mypictures/inbox/view.html?album_id=2091135665&id=3911022362&url=http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid225/p1831acd0be0c27cdcaee1e965973d569/e91d771a.jpg&caption=IMGP0932http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid225/p0e86bc93cf68245407618e8a9418e3bb/e91d8523.jpg

puppypaws
06-10-2007, 09:35 PM
Any way they gave me Hy-Yield PBNC fungicide. Will this help?
Thanks and God Bless
Shawn


Very hot dry weather is the easiest way to get rid of fungus the next best thing is a good fungicide such as you have.

Paradise Yard Service
06-10-2007, 10:45 PM
Thanks for the pic. It tells us so much. Go with the Fungi diagnosis. If it was Chinch bug you would usually see alot more decline than that. Hopefully you will not get any rain.

Aloha

txgrassguy
06-11-2007, 12:12 AM
[QUOTE=Paradise Yard Service;1857986]Augustine has few if any 'fungus' issues. Only one I know of is SAD virus, and I've never come accross it in Hawaii.

This is not true, not at all.
Most soil borne pathogens such can be easily seen in the large stolons common to St Augustine and the greatest impact of these pathogens to St Augustine is undoubtedly soil conditions.
Well drained, weathered soil like sand or volcanic deposits represent an ideal growing medium for St Augustine.
However, heavy clay or poorly drained soils are the Achilles heel to St Augustine as the turf recovers from injury very slowly and the recovery is hindered by lessor qualities of poor construct soils.
Additionally, insect infestations of St Augustine, be it foliar or soil borne will almost always result in the pathogen balance being upset and some type of fungal pathogen appearing.
PCNB is a good all around fungicide yet you have to identify the cause for the turf declining in the first place or all you are going to do is spray, spray and spray some more.
A cultural maintenance practice I heartily recommend is for aggressive aerification a minimum of two times per year with the aerification being completed in a X type pattern - meaning each aerification is done twice - to really open the soil up to allow mycrorhyzal bacterial respiration.
Get rid of the excessive CO2 build up in the soil, fertilize according to a good soil test, ensure your finished height of cut is above 3" and the turf will recover.