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dougmartin2003
06-10-2007, 11:09 AM
hey guys my back yard is full of clover in some sections and i was wondering what would be a good product to put down to get rid of it.would a liquid be better then a granular, what would u guys recomend, this is my own yard so i dont need a license to put anything down. thank for any help

turf hokie
06-10-2007, 11:57 AM
Sure, your own yard(wink,wink). And you only use 2 gallons of round-up every two years. Shouldn't have posted so vehemently in the other thread about not needing your license.

Maybe if you had a license you would be able to figure out what to buy and how to apply it, even if it is your own yard.

dougmartin2003
06-10-2007, 12:24 PM
whatever
go to hell

dougmartin2003
06-10-2007, 12:26 PM
i just ask a simple ?

dougmartin2003
06-10-2007, 12:29 PM
Sure, your own yard(wink,wink). And you only use 2 gallons of round-up every two years. Shouldn't have posted so vehemently in the other thread about not needing your license.



if you had read my other replys you would see that i agree with you about the license, but everytime someone on here mentions roundup some of you guys atake him like a wild animal

dougmartin2003
06-10-2007, 12:43 PM
if you dont belive me come to missouri and give me a estimate, hell after that i will take you out to the local bar for a couple drinks, hell im easy to get along with, untill start insinuating im a lier

Ric
06-10-2007, 01:41 PM
Sure, your own yard(wink,wink). And you only use 2 gallons of round-up every two years. Shouldn't have posted so vehemently in the other thread about not needing your license.

Maybe if you had a license you would be able to figure out what to buy and how to apply it, even if it is your own yard.

dougmartin2003

That Roundup you have does a great job on killing Clover. Try it, you might like it.

dougmartin2003
06-10-2007, 01:55 PM
i need something that wont kill the grass in the process

dougmartin2003
06-10-2007, 01:58 PM
if there is clover does that mean that the lawn is low on nitrogen, if so would a good fert help it out

dougmartin2003
06-10-2007, 01:59 PM
its really bad where we had a above ground pool was a couple years ago

31bro
06-10-2007, 02:02 PM
Trimec Will Work. Speedzone Also Work But It Must Be Under 85 Degrees.

dougmartin2003
06-10-2007, 02:12 PM
well then today would be a good day for it. does rain effect it

dougmartin2003
06-10-2007, 02:13 PM
its been sprinkling on and off today

Ric
06-10-2007, 02:18 PM
Doug

Of the First 13 posts in this thread 10 are posted by you. Maybe you need to correct your profile to reflect your True Mental age of 9.

dougmartin2003
06-10-2007, 02:22 PM
ric what the f$#k is your problem, i asked a simple question, if you dont wanna give me a simple answer then shut the hell up

dougmartin2003
06-10-2007, 06:48 PM
thanks 31bro. at least you you didnt bite my head off when you answered, thanks again

philk17088
06-10-2007, 07:57 PM
well then today would be a good day for it. does rain effect it
If you have to ask this question you have no business applying it.
Read the G.D. label!

dougmartin2003
06-10-2007, 08:03 PM
i just ask a ******* question, dont have to be a smartass, im just asking for advice, dont worry this is going to be on my yard, do you guys hate giving out advice

Branchland
06-10-2007, 08:06 PM
You check the lables on the stuff at Lowes or HD. I think most of it will kill clover. Or go by Lesco. I use Momentum or Speedzone. Drive also kills clover.

dougmartin2003
06-10-2007, 08:19 PM
thank you branchland

Nosmo
06-10-2007, 08:41 PM
Pick up a gallon of 2/4/D at TSC or Orschelins. Mix 4 TBSP to a gallon water -- say goodbye to the clover.

dougmartin2003
06-10-2007, 08:57 PM
i wouldnt need a gallon, just enough to do about 3000 sq ft, but thanks anyway nosmo

sprayboy
06-11-2007, 02:29 PM
if that is all you need then you could find a LICENSED business in your area and ask them to sell you a couple ounces, or better yet ask them if they will donate it to you. I would think they would help out a 9 year old.

JB1
06-11-2007, 02:53 PM
:hammerhead: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

dougmartin2003
06-11-2007, 05:45 PM
ha ha thats so funny

dougmartin2003
06-11-2007, 05:48 PM
i give up. **** you guys. whenever someone needs advice you guys are always there

jt5019
06-11-2007, 05:51 PM
I would go to Home Depot, Lowes, or Lesco if you have one. Start reading lables in the fertilizer section you will find what you need.

dougmartin2003
06-11-2007, 05:55 PM
thank you jt, i just wanted to get someone opinion on what would be good for the clover but not hurt the grass.

JB1
06-11-2007, 07:29 PM
White Clover in Golf Courses, Sports Turf, and Lawns

The small white flowers of white clover are very visible right now and it may appear that clover is taking over, especially under-fertilized turf areas. Clover is a legume and is very competitive under low N conditions, so increasing annual N is best method for long-term control. The temptation is to apply a herbicide now to control clover, but unfortunately applications during warm weather can cause damage to turf while providing less-than-effective control. The best overall method for controlling clover is to increase your annual fertilization. This combined with an application a broadleaf herbicide in mid-October should minimize many of the clover problems. Herbicides applied now are not as effective as fall applications, but control is adequate to justify applications made by professionals now. However, insure that the clover and grass are well-watered and not under stress. Avoid making herbicide applications when temperatures are above 80oF because turf burn is likely and control will be less effective. Our studies have found Drive or any product containing clopyralid to be most effective on clover, but 2,4-D alone will not control clover effectively. Be sure to read the label on your specific clopyralid-containing product because many of these cannot be used on homelawns. Many products can burn creeping bentgrass in the heat of summer, but Lontrel appears to be the safest for bentgrass. Spotlight, which is Dow’s new replacement for clopyralid in lawns, will also control clover. Be sure to tankmix spotlight with 2,4-D and/or other broadleaf products to expand the number of weeds controlled. Also realize applications made now will have to be followed up with fall applications for best control.


You have the best resources available at your fingertips, but your apparently to lazy to do a little research to find it. Its not hard under any search engine you can find out what you need to do but that might be to easy.

americanlawn
06-11-2007, 07:29 PM
Triclopyr seems to be the ingredient that hurts clover the most (according to research done by land grant universites. We have sprayed "Chaser" on lawns covered in clover, and we got 100% kill in one app. Chaser is 2-4D + Triclopyr (ester). Good luck.

philk17088
06-11-2007, 08:45 PM
Triclopyr seems to be the ingredient that hurts clover the most (according to research done by land grant universites. We have sprayed "Chaser" on lawns covered in clover, and we got 100% kill in one app. Chaser is 2-4D + Triclopyr (ester). Good luck.
Is triclopyr even labeled for lawns anymore?
I was told that it isn't due to the fact that it has residual activity in the clippings.

Whoops. I am think of clopyralid

dougmartin2003
06-11-2007, 09:08 PM
White Clover in Golf Courses, Sports Turf, and Lawns

The small white flowers of white clover are very visible right now and it may appear that clover is taking over, especially under-fertilized turf areas. Clover is a legume and is very competitive under low N conditions, so increasing annual N is best method for long-term control. The temptation is to apply a herbicide now to control clover, but unfortunately applications during warm weather can cause damage to turf while providing less-than-effective control. The best overall method for controlling clover is to increase your annual fertilization. This combined with an application a broadleaf herbicide in mid-October should minimize many of the clover problems. Herbicides applied now are not as effective as fall applications, but control is adequate to justify applications made by professionals now. However, insure that the clover and grass are well-watered and not under stress. Avoid making herbicide applications when temperatures are above 80oF because turf burn is likely and control will be less effective. Our studies have found Drive or any product containing clopyralid to be most effective on clover, but 2,4-D alone will not control clover effectively. Be sure to read the label on your specific clopyralid-containing product because many of these cannot be used on homelawns. Many products can burn creeping bentgrass in the heat of summer, but Lontrel appears to be the safest for bentgrass. Spotlight, which is Dow’s new replacement for clopyralid in lawns, will also control clover. Be sure to tankmix spotlight with 2,4-D and/or other broadleaf products to expand the number of weeds controlled. Also realize applications made now will have to be followed up with fall applications for best control.


You have the best resources available at your fingertips, but your apparently to lazy to do a little research to find it. Its not hard under any search engine you can find out what you need to do but that might be to easy.




god damn im sorry i asked.

edited for language jodi

unit28
06-12-2007, 07:53 AM
scythe plus round up pro...love it or leave it.

Ric
06-12-2007, 08:54 AM
god damn im sorry i asked

Dougmartin

I see you are still using your Dynamic personality to win friends and influence people.

dougmartin2003
06-12-2007, 03:54 PM
yep sure am ric have a nice day

zz4guy
06-20-2007, 12:53 AM
Roundup works great to kill clovers. It's a white jug with green labels.


Let us know how it goes...

richard coffman
06-20-2007, 07:52 PM
here's what you do, since you don't have a chemical lisence, i'll give you the cheap and effective way of killing your clover. i would mix your regular rate of weed control for the summer months, and then take a tiny bit of dish washing soap and add it to your weed control and water, then stir. the dish washing soap acts as a surfactant or sticker spreader as others call it and will stick itself to the clover. the clover has a natural protective layer which it why it's hard to kill it with just weed control (unless you buy the good stuff like the rest of us do). the dish soap with the weed control will break down the protective layer of the clover and then will go in the for the kill. this method works wonders on your hard to kill weeds, even your purple oxollis. i hope this helpes answer your question in detail.

drumbo
06-27-2007, 10:36 PM
I use Momentum FX2 and it works wonders. Pay attention to the weather before you decide to apply...heat, rain, etc can affect it. We have tons of it over here in Hannibal.