PDA

View Full Version : landscape job profit


image1
06-19-2007, 09:11 PM
Lets say u did a job in 7 hrs with 4 men all your plant material planted raked down and strawed u had $2500 dollars inthe job thats all plant materil 4men fuel to get everrything together all i did was watch and make sure everything was done right what should the profit be onthis job the 2500 covered ins,men,gasand plant material so how much shold i profit on this job.

DBL
06-19-2007, 09:54 PM
dont have too many details but try to get $35- $40 an hour for just labor atleast $45 -$50 an hour if theyre using power equipment. plant material retail plus 55% to plant and mark the straw up about $10 to $15 and then youre fuel and any other exspences

Tim Wright
06-19-2007, 10:07 PM
Thats per man.

Tim

Pro-Scapes
06-19-2007, 10:55 PM
as much as you need to in order to stay in business and make your desired profit.

If you dont understand overhead..(this includes labor fuel overhead taxes insurance equipment ect) then you should probably be working for someone else.

image1
06-19-2007, 10:56 PM
no power tools all hand digging and raking to plant material 4 15gal and 6 7gal 30 3gal and thats it stake the big trees.

Pro-Scapes
06-20-2007, 08:28 PM
it took 4 guys 7 hours to plant that ? wow. I think my wife can do that solo in 7 hours.

BCF
06-20-2007, 08:29 PM
So you did the job and are not sure how much money you have left? I aim for between $1 and $1,000,000 a day. :)

image1
06-20-2007, 10:07 PM
I said that was cost on that part of the job was wondering if i double that the plants were 1800 the rest was labor ,we put in one zone of irrigation about 2 of those hrs and staked 7 12 ft trees and prepped all the beds for plants and moved some existing plants that he didnot like where they were that money had no profit added to it yet just wonderig what u guys charge.

PatriotLandscape
06-22-2007, 08:52 PM
15-35% profit margins depends on what you are calling profit.

managers still need to be paid a salary.

Drew Gemma
06-22-2007, 11:29 PM
you can;t ask about profit you mean mark up on mark up at 30% we each have a different profit margin.

Harley-D
06-23-2007, 10:33 AM
Profit for the job should be set before you start the job. Then it changes as the job is being done. Shoot for the stars but be prepared to land your a$$ on the moon. Ballpark 800 to 1200 after all said and done. If that's the case: take an orchid with you for the owners for the walkthrough, if there is one, a week after the job's done.

On another note: you other guys...

How can you get away with charging an hourly rate? Doesn't the customer ask "How much for this?" What do you say? "Depends on how long it takes?", "If it's 110 degrees it'll cost you more than if it's cool that day?", "If i hit a large rock and have to bring my machine in, it'll cost you like 250 more?"

Risky and inaccurate way to propose pricing for a job. I understand if you're a one man show. Some days i make 500, some i make 50. But my customers reffer me and are very happy with my work. We're contractors, we should do contract work. Not hourly walmart employees.
Always have a proposal contract signed before work starts.

PatriotLandscape
06-23-2007, 01:20 PM
from what I have read most people here are not contractors they don't even ave contracts for the maintenance clients.

We do all our work off contracts and it is up to me to make sure I make the profit I need to or bust ass and make more than I expected.

bullethead
06-26-2007, 10:01 AM
I don't think insurance should be in the cost number if you are trying to get a gross margin type of calculation. Insurance is not a direct cost, it is part of your overhead. Lets say you are shooting for a 40% gross margin, then take your directs costs of approximately $2,500/.6 = $4,166 Sales Price.

bullethead
06-26-2007, 10:04 AM
On another note: you other guys...

How can you get away with charging an hourly rate? .


Maybe I don't understand your question, but how can you not charge based on the number of expected hours?

Mike Fronczak
06-26-2007, 03:42 PM
"If i hit a large rock and have to bring my machine in, it'll cost you like 250 more?"
Depending on how your proposal is written you can protect yourself, still make your money, & still have a happy customer. My brother did fence installation for quite awhile, the largest contractor in the area (does work all over state, including jails, etc.) contract states if a machine is required its more(I don't have the exact verbage in front of me).

Harley-D
06-28-2007, 10:50 AM
Maybe I don't understand your question, but how can you not charge based on the number of expected hours?

I'm with you sorta. You do need to know how long somthing will take you to do. But charging the customer for the supplies, whether you mark them up or not, and then giving a per hour rate is risky i believe. The reason is the customer will always expect it to be done faster.(How's he gonna know you didn't charge him for that 20 min water break because it's 110 out.)
They have no idea. Without them knowing, you need to treat every customer as if they are a 5 year old. You can't reason with them, tell them only what they need to know, and keep them away from large machinery.

Depending on how your proposal is written you can protect yourself, still make your money, & still have a happy customer. My brother did fence installation for quite awhile, the largest contractor in the area (does work all over state, including jails, etc.) contract states if a machine is required its more(I don't have the exact verbage in front of me).

mike, i believe you too but it sounds as if you know it might be risky. I'm an apprehensive person anyway so i don't trust anyone except my wife and mom.
Sounds like your bro does alot of contract work. And i'm sure he hasn't had a problem but you can easily keep yourself out of court by handing the customer another copy of the signed contract with a total at the bottom. The only time i can justify doing contract work on an hour basis is if you tell the customer the job is 1000 and you have 600 in cost and 10 hours at 40/hour. 1/2 up front, 1/2 at the end. NO per hour charge, we're not mechanics.

drmiller100
06-28-2007, 08:00 PM
I've got a crew of two guys and me that have worked together for 2 years. I spend a LOT of time looking for easier ways to do things.

We dig water taps with an Excavator. We have all sprinkler parts ready to go, and can do it REALLY fast, and very NICE.

We had a competitor call. They had a crew of 5 guys for 2 weeks working on a sprinkler system and grading the yard. The foreman hired us to come show them how to finish it.
We spent 6 hours, tapped the feed, dug the trenches, levelled the yard, installed sprinklers, and planted the clock. Would have been a lot less, but we let their crew actually do most of the work so they could learn. Mostly they learned they don't know what the frick they are doing and we do.

So how much should I charge? I charged the other contractor 1800 bucks for 6 hours work for 2 guys and some equipment time and 400 bucks in sprinkler parts.

Customer probably got charged 10,000 bucks for 2 weeks of 5 guys.

What you charge has NOTHING to do with what it costs. That is just an ignorant way fo thinking.
You charge what the customer perceives the value to be.

Today we installed a sprinkler system. Existing lawn, crappy old stinky well with scary plumbing and 7 gallons per minute.

The property is near the lake, and the owner is tired of having to come to his vacation home to water his lawn that looks like crap.

I sold him on the idea of pulling pipe, saving his lawn, and adding resell value to his vacation home due to ease of maintenance. When done, he thinks he is getting a great bargain at 2900 bucks. We spent half a day and probably 500 bucks in parts on the high side.

On the flip side, we only get 4 months to make money, so it drives the "hourly workers" out of the market.