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shade tree landscaping
06-20-2007, 05:04 PM
How do you guys charge for pavers? Do you charge doube the fee you pay to buy them, or is there another formula? thanks in advance

zedosix
06-20-2007, 05:53 PM
How do you guys charge for pavers? Do you charge doube the fee you pay to buy them, or is there another formula? thanks in advance

Yup thats it, simple as that. :)

Total Landscape Solutions
06-20-2007, 07:18 PM
Cost of materials, * 5 / .6 - 9 + suqare root of radius of largest circle * 3.14

Duh!!:hammerhead:

Jay Works
06-20-2007, 08:41 PM
Total up all of the material costs, then double. It is a good place to start, and you can adjust from there. I do that and it usually comes out to $12 - $14 per suare foot depending of the product used.

ChampionLS
06-20-2007, 09:19 PM
Total up all of the material costs, then double. It is a good place to start, and you can adjust from there. I do that and it usually comes out to $12 - $14 per suare foot depending of the product used.

Hmmmmmm.... okay- I want a paver driveway. I can't make up my mind on a pattern. It's a toss up between a Herringbone pattern or a 4 size random pattern with 4 different color pavers to give it that little extra splash of color.

All the materials cost the same, so I think I'll go with the random!
When can you start? :dizzy:

l3en007
06-20-2007, 09:30 PM
How do you guys charge for pavers? Do you charge doube the fee you pay to buy them, or is there another formula? thanks in advance

You just have to do your research. Find out what the going rate per square foot is around you. Around here, the going rate is between 16 and 18 dollars a square foot. Also, like any other job, you have to figure out all your costs, overhead, etc....These things vary every job. Do your self a favor if you can..and make it to a MAHTS convention. VERY HELPFUL.
GOOD LUCK!

shade tree landscaping
06-21-2007, 07:50 AM
l3en007 What, Whrer and when is the MAHTS?

Jay Works
06-21-2007, 08:18 AM
These sites are a wealth of knowledge with equal amount of people stuck on themselves. People post questions for a good reason and are looking for advise. I am fairly new to the business and appreciate the help. It is very frustrating when people just downgrade and act like a smart ass. I offer what works for me. I work for myself and have no employees, so I am different than most of you that have a crew to do it for you. When you give a price you have to be able to look the people in the eye and be comfortable about it. All of my business comes from word of mouth. I am more interested in giving the customer what they want at a good price and getting a couple of refferals out of it. An extra $1000 on a job is not worth negative press. I also provide home repairs as a contractor. So the little sidewalk usually turns into a new bathroom in the winter or a new roof next summer. Remember that without the customer none of use would have a job. I hope this helps you guys starting out, and if I stepped on any toes, get over it.

meets1
06-21-2007, 10:15 PM
My area - $8 a sq starting out for basic layout. Different designs, color, borders running thru out - may be as high as $14.

bishoplandscape
06-22-2007, 01:06 AM
Do your self a favor and take landscaping out of your name switch it with lawn care and stick to that.

shade tree landscaping
06-22-2007, 07:10 AM
thnks for the helpful advice bishop! I guess u woke up one morning with an established business, and knew how to do everything that very same morning! You should take landscape out of your name and replace it with as*hole!

JimmyStew
06-22-2007, 07:59 PM
How do you guys charge for pavers?

First off, I don't price or estimate a whole job based on a per square foot price. As far as I'm concerned, there are far too many variable for that to be effective, in my experience anyway. So, how do I charge for them?...

I take my cost on the pavers, add delivery charges (whether from the supplier or if I have to go pick them up my time and gas), add a % markup to cover admin. costs such as my time order them, go pick them out, be on site when they are delivered, plus carrying the cost of the pavers on my charge account, and then add a % markup for profit on the pavers.

Ultimately, what this boils down to is a certain percent that I add to my cost irregardless of the paver but depending on what vendor I buy from.

STRINGALATION
06-22-2007, 08:10 PM
hEY SHADE TREE BE CAREFUL OVER HERE IN HARDSCAPING. HAVE YOU NOTICED THE MORE MONEY YOU MAKE THE MORE OF A JERK YOU ARE ALSO HARDSCAPING IS VERY EXACT SO THEY ARE PICKY so dont let them throw you off just aim to be in there tax bracket and level of quality

Captains Landscape
06-22-2007, 08:11 PM
shady, build yourself a small patio with cuts at your own home or for a relative. Try to factor in all possible phases of flat work into the patio. Look at the completed work and ask yourself if a customer would be happy with it. I always make the first attempt at my place before I sell to a customer. You will then know how long it takes to build your project. Also try www.icpi.org first, its worth it!

cgland
06-22-2007, 08:26 PM
thnks for the helpful advice bishop! I guess u woke up one morning with an established business, and knew how to do everything that very same morning! You should take landscape out of your name and replace it with as*hole!


ROFLMAO!:laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

Chris

PatriotLandscape
06-22-2007, 08:28 PM
thnks for the helpful advice bishop! I guess u woke up one morning with an established business, and knew how to do everything that very same morning! You should take landscape out of your name and replace it with as*hole!

very funny come back I had a chuckle.

andrewcarrigan
06-24-2007, 04:43 PM
maybe you should do a job at home first,and get trained on how to lay and cut pavers and how to build ,compact and grade a base. if you do something know how to and do it right.good luck!!! we charge 18-24$ per sq ft

andrewcarrigan
06-24-2007, 04:45 PM
*trucewhiteflag* :canadaflag: :usflag: =:drinkup:

bishoplandscape
06-25-2007, 02:01 AM
Sounds kinda nice but wouldn't be the first time i heard that.

Wow that was a good one. I like it. But someone advertising for paver work that doesn't know how to price it sure doesn't know how to lay them.

Jay Works
06-25-2007, 07:37 AM
That is not true. I have installed for years working for someone else. It is a different and difficult process to learn without helpful suggestions.

Mike33
06-25-2007, 06:16 PM
I still believe in the theory if you can't price it how can you build it. If you have all kind if experience with pavers then you should know how long it will take and what material is needed. Not to hard to come up with some kind of plan. If your new in the game i hardly think your going to get the price of the premier contractors in your area.
Mike

Woodland
06-26-2007, 08:50 PM
How do you guys charge for pavers? Do you charge doube the fee you pay to buy them, or is there another formula? thanks in advance

Excellent question! I'm thinking about revamping how I charge for pavers and would love some insight. Many of my hardscaping jobs are done time and materials but I recently lost out on part of a project over what I was charging for the pavers. I have been marking up the pavers 50% over my contractor price to cover delivery cost and my time to order and set up the delivery, etc. plus a little extra for profit. On this recent estimate, during the discussion, the client asked for a breakdown of materials vs. labor. In the end they decided to go forward with the project but they would provide the pavers since they could get them cheaper themselves, which is correct. I figured this was not worth losing the job over since I'm not losing money, but I don't want it to happen again! So here is what I'm thinking...

I would charge the retail price that my supplier offers, this would give me a small profit on the materials (generally about 20%) AND charge a delivery fee (probably equal to the charge my supplier charges). My issue is, however, that I need to get some $ for my time spent dealing with the ordering, i.e. time figuring exactly what to order, setting up the deliveries, either being onsite for delivery or at least marking out the drop locations for the drivers, etc, etc. How can I build this into my billing? Do I pad the hours by a couple, add another line item for "Admin costs", or is there some other common practice for dealing with this?

andrewcarrigan
06-27-2007, 01:18 PM
we charge by the sq foot you just give them the total of sq foot ,if your charging 18.00 per sq foot and your doing 500sq feet =$9000 plus tax never let them know how much the costs are cause they will always think you make too much $$$$ just say everything is based on a per sq foot rating this is how we do it no reason it wont for u main thing do a good job get and get out to yhe next one

zedosix
06-27-2007, 02:11 PM
we charge by the sq foot you just give them the total of sq foot ,if your charging 18.00 per sq foot and your doing 500sq feet =$9000 plus tax never let them know how much the costs are cause they will always think you make too much $$$$ just say everything is based on a per sq foot rating this is how we do it no reason it wont for u main thing do a good job get and get out to yhe next one


Ok I need 50 sq.ft. put down Andrew, are you willing to come to my place to lay 50 sq.ft. for 900 dollars. I doubt it, if so you are selling yourself short, and the same goes if you sell a client 5000 sq.ft. for 90,000 you are ripping them off. Figure out what it costs you to do business per hour, including material, you will end up with a more accurate figure.

PerfiCut L&L
06-27-2007, 09:11 PM
This may be a bit winded but I will try to get the point across as short as possible.

For most (established) hardscapers...pricing strictly by the S.F. is not practical given the numbe of variables. Each job requires a different amount of labor based on location, obstructions, access, utilities, and anything else that might cost time to work around. Not to mention the hidden soil conditions (wet clays) and such. You will need to consider what type of equipment will be needed, loaders, trenchers, mini-ex, cats, dingos, or wheel barrows. Lot size, project locations and obstructions may limit the equipment you are even able to use.

Those are just a few of the variables which change from job to job. Once you have decided the proper equipment needed, your costs involved, your markup, then you calculate the labor hours needed. Over time and with experience you will come to learn how productive you and or a crew of 'x' can be doing a particular task, such as how long it takes to excavate 100s.f. of sod/topsoil, how long will it take to install 1 ton of sub base and compact it, or how many l.f. of paver cuts can be made per hour, and so on. By breaking your job into smaller jobs, and tracking the time it takes to perform each task, you will better yourself in estimating future projects.

As for costs... Of course your labor rate + equipment costs + (material costs +markup) + Delivery and or Disposal Fees.

Delivery fees will vary. Are you picking them up. Are you paying to have them delivered. Where are they coming from and how much is it costing you? Pass this cost on to the customer in your Delivery fee.

Disposal fees. Again, what are you disposing of, where does it have to go, and what is it going to cost?

Dont forget to account for your time in ordering the materials. Designing the project, and or any permits required. Also include you labor burdon fees.

These are just a few of the variables associated with bidding/billing a job and since each job will have different costs, the bottom line price can not be accounted for in a flat $/s.f cost. However, you should be within your markets average cost range, perhaps $12-$16 per s.f. for pavers.

Attend some of the seminars and or training courses offered at the local trade shows. Or take a trip to one. The information you can obtain may be worth 10x the money it cost you to get it.

Sorry if this was long winded, and I hope I didnt confuse you or, belittle you if you already new this.

hoskm01
06-28-2007, 12:52 AM
You can present the cost to the customer in sq. ft. figures once you have figured out what that job should cost and didvided it by the total number of feet. Sq. ft. for the customer is easy to understand. One lump total for a patio is difficult to understand and hard to swallow.

PatriotLandscape
06-28-2007, 12:53 AM
I would charge the retail price that my supplier offers, this would give me a small profit on the materials (generally about 20%) AND charge a delivery fee (probably equal to the charge my supplier charges). My issue is, however, that I need to get some $ for my time spent dealing with the ordering, i.e. time figuring exactly what to order, setting up the deliveries, either being onsite for delivery or at least marking out the drop locations for the drivers, etc, etc. How can I build this into my billing? Do I pad the hours by a couple, add another line item for "Admin costs", or is there some other common practice for dealing with this?

your admin costs should be rocovered by doing work in the field it is a cost of doing business that should be in you hourly rate.

hoskm01
06-28-2007, 12:55 AM
your admin costs should be rocovered by doing work in the field it is a cost of doing business that should be in you hourly rate.


So you dont mark up your materials? Just cost of materials plus your desired hourly rate?

You are missing out if so.

PerfiCut L&L
06-29-2007, 07:38 AM
http://www.hunterindustries.com/Resources/Library/Business/200605_hdln_labor_cost.html

A small article discussing labor burden to hofelly help you figure out what yours is. This is a MUST. Most small contractors/landscapers do not include this, resulting in less of a profit since your labor burden costs are always going to be thier, and they need to be paid from somewhere.

PatriotLandscape
06-29-2007, 03:48 PM
So you dont mark up your materials? Just cost of materials plus your desired hourly rate?

You are missing out if so.

I was speaking of admin costs exclusively.

As far as marking this up if contractor A doesn't mark his materials up and Contractor B does when they both have the same price what is the diference? some people think of it as a bonus or free money when it truly is all incorporated anyway.

Woodland
06-29-2007, 06:59 PM
http://www.hunterindustries.com/Resources/Library/Business/200605_hdln_labor_cost.html

A small article discussing labor burden to hofelly help you figure out what yours is. This is a MUST. Most small contractors/landscapers do not include this, resulting in less of a profit since your labor burden costs are always going to be thier, and they need to be paid from somewhere.

I'm not sure that this is what I am talking about. The article you referenced is dealing with "indirect" labor costs such as insurance, benefits, etc. but I am talking about actual time I spend for a specific project but I'm not actually onsite. I.e. I may spend 1 hour in the office figuring out exactly what I need for pavers on a job and another hour calling my supplier to inquire/order them and set up a delivery. Is this 2 hours that I can bill my customer for or should this be part of my hourly rate as "overhead" or "labor burden". This same "extra" time isn't necessary for every project I do so would I be overcharging some customers by raising my hourly rate to cover extra time needed on someone else's project?

A little off the paver topic but...when you bill a customer time & materials, when do you start the billing clock? when you arrive at the project site, when you leave the shop, or when you start loading up the truck. Likewise, when do you stop the clock?

andrewcarrigan
06-29-2007, 07:02 PM
no i wouldnt your right all i was doing was trying to give an example he asking how people do it , i was just stating a ball park way of how we do it ,and yes i agree with you on your point we done it for a few years and you kinda learn what involved my points were just to someone starting out,a starting point and i was saying we dont just mark up the material costs andwe dont tell customers what the costs are .