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agm
06-21-2007, 12:22 AM
I know the proper way to prune rose bushes but, has anybody ever used hedge trimmers to do it and shape them? I always use pruning shears but obviously this takes time! Just trying to look for a quicker way.

johnnywill08
06-21-2007, 10:48 AM
i use trimmers on out of control roses to shape them and then clean em up with hand pruners (ie cut back the stubs, etc.)

sheshovel
06-21-2007, 04:29 PM
Absolutely not! Hedge trimmers will tear them up and leave ragged cuts. You need to leave a clean cut.
Not only that but if you knew how to properly prune them then you would know that you should cut to a bud that is growing in the direction you want that stem to go. Using a hedge trimmer would make that impossible.
Even on an out of control rose, I would use selective cuts with a pair of loppers or a stick pruner to get it into a manageable size to prune. Never hedge trimmers.
Some tasks just take time, once you get really good at it, then you can do it fairly quickly. If you are using a good quality hand pruner (I call them nips) that are kept sharp and clean.

johnnywill08
06-21-2007, 05:11 PM
Absolutely not! Hedge trimmers will tear them up and leave ragged cuts. You need to leave a clean cut.
Not only that but if you knew how to properly prune them then you would know that you should cut to a bud that is growing in the direction you want that stem to go. Using a hedge trimmer would make that impossible.
Even on an out of control rose, I would use selective cuts with a pair of loppers or a stick pruner to get it into a manageable size to prune. Never hedge trimmers.
Some tasks just take time, once you get really good at it, then you can do it fairly quickly. If you are using a good quality hand pruner (I call them nips) that are kept sharp and clean.


yes you can, as long as you clean up the cuts in the end. why does this not make sense to you? its the same thing in the end only quicker. its gets all the heavy stuff out of the way and allows you to work on the shrub. i am a horticulturist and have a degree in botany and i'm telling you, as long as you clean up the shrubs with hand snips, its the same thing. just dont leave ragged stubs.

greg1
06-21-2007, 08:23 PM
:rolleyes:


:rolleyes:

agm
06-21-2007, 11:41 PM
I THINK I WILL BELIEVE YOU AND NOT SHESHOVEL SINCE YOUR THE HORTICULTURIST!! Anyways, thanks for the info, I really appreciate it. Hopefully this makes things pretty quick.

PerfectEarth
06-21-2007, 11:49 PM
Um, I suppose you could do it like johnnywill says but you'd then have to clean up all the debris and then painstakingly go back over each rose and re-cut the trimmer cut. Makes more sense to me to hand prune the correct way, toss the cuttings into a pile/basket/yardbag/whatever.... Kill two birds with one stone.

I've honestly worked with very large landscape companies on a variety of projects and NEVER have I seen a pair of gas powered trimmers on a rose. It's just not done.

AUHort1990
06-22-2007, 08:24 AM
Um, I suppose you could do it like johnnywill says but you'd then have to clean up all the debris and then painstakingly go back over each rose and re-cut the trimmer cut. Makes more sense to me to hand prune the correct way, toss the cuttings into a pile/basket/yardbag/whatever.... Kill two birds with one stone.

I've honestly worked with very large landscape companies on a variety of projects and NEVER have I seen a pair of gas powered trimmers on a rose. It's just not done.

I agree...and I'm a horticulturist too. Just hand prune them and be done with it. To heck with going back and re-pruning every branch.

sheshovel
06-22-2007, 08:49 AM
yes you can, as long as you clean up the cuts in the end. why does this not make sense to you? its the same thing in the end only quicker. its gets all the heavy stuff out of the way and allows you to work on the shrub. i am a horticulturist and have a degree in botany and i'm telling you, as long as you clean up the shrubs with hand snips, its the same thing. just dont leave ragged stubs.

Fine for you, but he was wanting a faster way. Not a way that makes him do the work twice. Like I said, I am sure that works, but like why do it???????

sheshovel
06-22-2007, 08:51 AM
I THINK I WILL BELIEVE YOU AND NOT SHESHOVEL SINCE YOUR THE HORTICULTURIST!! Anyways, thanks for the info, I really appreciate it. Hopefully this makes things pretty quick.

Maybe I am a horticulturist with no need to announce it when I am talking about pruning roses with hedge trimmers.

AUHort1990
06-22-2007, 08:55 AM
Maybe I am a horticulturist with no need to announce it when I am talking about pruning roses with hedge trimmers.

Touche'!!!!!!

johnnywill08
06-22-2007, 09:25 AM
i'm just giving the guy a way to get the shape of the shrub he wants (i'm operaing on the assumption the shrub is badly overgrown) and then its easier to tidy it up with overgrowth out of the way. i'm not suggesting he leave it this way. and if the shrub isn't that overgrown, thee'd be no need to break out the trimmers.

hey in biz, time is $$ and if you can knock a few min off a job, without the quality of the work suffering, so much the better.

upidstay
06-22-2007, 01:04 PM
You answered your own question in your original post
"I know the proper way to prune roses" were your original words. The proper way to prune roses is with hand snips. The only roses I ever pruned with hedge trimmers were big multi-flora roses, and that was just to cut them away from a fence line for safety. I'm not a horticulturist, don;t have a degree in botany. I was shown how to do it by my grandmother, who had a high school education. And she also had 50 some odd years of taking care of gorgeous roses. Id' listen to the mighty She, if I were you. She generally knows what she's talking about.

Accu-cut Lawn Care
06-22-2007, 01:14 PM
I'm not a certified horticulturist of botanist; but, I was trained by the rose expert for the City Of Chattanooga during my tenure there. I was given the responsibilty of pruning over 800 overgrown rose bushes at Coolidge Park. As to hedge pruners....Hell no. Get a good pair of felcos and start opening up the middle of the plant. As you get experience, you'll get better at making the proper cuts to minimize the amount of cuts needed to do the job. If you are a real stickler, you can seal your cuts with a dab of elmers glue.

AUHort1990
06-22-2007, 01:29 PM
If you are a real stickler, you can seal your cuts with a dab of elmers glue.

Now that sounds like fun! ;)

Accu-cut Lawn Care
06-22-2007, 02:49 PM
Now that sounds like fun! ;)

Ha, it was fun. Each rose bush probably required about 100 cuts. Thats 80000 dabs of elmers glue by my count! The entire job took me and a crew of two or three about a year to complete!

jsf343
06-22-2007, 03:17 PM
ok, I am a rose dummy, what does the elmers do? elmers glue do? :laugh:

Accu-cut Lawn Care
06-22-2007, 04:37 PM
ok, I am a rose dummy, what does the elmers do? elmers glue do? :laugh:

Whenever you prune a rose, or any other plant for that matter, each cut creates an opening for insects and disease. Elmer's is a good and non-toxic way to seal the wound from aphids and bore.

LindblomRJ
06-22-2007, 05:28 PM
I was thinking about the hedge trimmer on rose bushes. In the amound of time you could take with the hedge trimmers and the time to go back and clean up with pruners you would be just as quick to use the pruners and make one cut. And the end result would be better IMHO.

iand
07-12-2007, 08:35 AM
i always use hedge trimmers on my 35 standard roses and all my other roses as well,have done for 6 or 7 years and people always comment how good they look

jameson
07-12-2007, 09:42 AM
Whenever you prune a rose, or any other plant for that matter, each cut creates an opening for insects and disease. Elmer's is a good and non-toxic way to seal the wound from aphids and bore.

What a thread. . . . :dizzy:

Not only is the idea of "pruning" roses with hedge shears anathema and improper for the promotion of blooms (unless thorns are your pleasure), now we are advocating sealing the myriad of selective cuts (read: proper pruning technique) with glue (the dressing of proper pruning cuts with any sealant is a horticultural practice that has been soundly debunked)?

Stick to cutting grass.

Grassmechanic
07-12-2007, 04:42 PM
A good set of hand pruners (felco) are the ONLY thing that should touch a rose bush (and many other shrubs, but that's another subject). The Elmers glue has been a a bone of contention for many rose growers - some like it, some don't. I don't use it.

Disclaimer: I'm only a degreed Horticulturist, a Rosarian, and only have been doing this for about 25 years, so take advice accordingly.

KTO Enterprises
07-12-2007, 06:32 PM
I usually prune up the rose bushes with the weed wacker while im trimming the yard.

iand
07-12-2007, 11:09 PM
Also, similar to the results of their experiments with deadheading, the Royal National Rose Society in England has demonstrated that classical pruning techniques really aren't necessary. As long as you're not striving to grow exhibition-quality flowers, almost any rose can be pruned and shaped with hedge shears, in the same manner as other landscape shrubs and hedges. You'll find that It will bloom just as well as roses that are pruned by more formal techniques.this has also been studied in australia with similar results but it is worth noting that the australian study found the worst result has been rose bushs that were tidied up after using the hedge shearers

Accu-cut Lawn Care
07-12-2007, 11:40 PM
What a thread. . . . :dizzy:

Not only is the idea of "pruning" roses with hedge shears anathema and improper for the promotion of blooms (unless thorns are your pleasure), now we are advocating sealing the myriad of selective cuts (read: proper pruning technique) with glue (the dressing of proper pruning cuts with any sealant is a horticultural practice that has been soundly debunked)?

Stick to cutting grass.

I bet you that I've SUCCESSFULLY pruned more rose bushes than you've ever touched. As I said, "if you are a stickler"... Nothing wrong could ever come from sealing a plant wound with elmers glue. It's better to be safe than sorry in SOME cases.

1MajorTom
07-13-2007, 12:49 AM
Actually sealing the cuts with Elmer's is something that I had read about previously.
Here it is listed as a method, under the pruning section.

7. Seal the cuts with shellac, Elmer's Glue or a mixture of Bordeaux compound and linseed oil, The yellow, Elmer's Carpenter's Wood Glue is less pervious to water than the white and is therefore preferred.



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