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Victor
06-27-2007, 09:50 PM
Can anyone tell me if White Pampas grass would have invasive tendencies if I planted a specimen here in Columbus, OH? We're considered to be zone 6 here.

I love the way White Pampas Grass looks, but if it's going to turn out to be a living nightmare I'll select something else. Any feedback will be greatly appreciated.

Jason Rose
06-27-2007, 11:44 PM
Personally I think pampas grass is a nightmare reguardless, but it's because everyone that has a home here has at least one clump somewhere!

Iv'e never seen it be invasive, though the clump grows larger in diameter each season eventually with a dead center. On ocassion I DO see it grow from seed where it's not supposed to be, but these are always landscapes that have seen ZERO maintenance for years and years. It dosn't spread into lawns, etc. like many of the other ornamental grasses do.

I have to cut down around 100+ clumps a year... and I even have 4 here at home, lol. I hate the stuff. Though it is pretty.

Victor
06-28-2007, 12:35 AM
Personally I think pampas grass is a nightmare reguardless, but it's because everyone that has a home here has at least one clump somewhere!

Iv'e never seen it be invasive, though the clump grows larger in diameter each season eventually with a dead center. On ocassion I DO see it grow from seed where it's not supposed to be, but these are always landscapes that have seen ZERO maintenance for years and years. It dosn't spread into lawns, etc. like many of the other ornamental grasses do.

I have to cut down around 100+ clumps a year... and I even have 4 here at home, lol. I hate the stuff. Though it is pretty.

Wow Jason. I don't blame you for hating it, if you have to deal with that many of them every year. Are you talking about White, or Pink Pampas Grass? I was also wondering what zone you're in? Thanks for the input.

Jason Rose
06-28-2007, 12:45 AM
I'm pretty sure that most of it's white. There's really not much difference between the white and the pink, you have to look rather close to even tell.

We are zone 6 here.

I know the stuff prefers HEAT, and I'm unsure of it's "cold hardiness", but we get down into the negative teens some winters and the crap never seems to die, lol.

Fairway Land & Lawn
06-28-2007, 12:54 AM
I have white pampas in my backyard at home and really like it. As far as the "dead" center goes, this only happens if not cut back over the winter. After the first frost I cut mine back. Once spring arrives (mid march, southeastern Va) I cut the bottom out of a steel bucket, place it over the "dead" center and light it on fire. This will burn it below the ground. Always seems to come back healthier, and maintain a managable size. May not work for everyone, but does for me. Plus, the fire gives me a good reason to stand in the yard, scratch my belly, and drink a beer!!!!! Win Win on my end...Good luck keeping it controlled......

Victor
06-28-2007, 12:57 AM
Thank you very much for all the good info Jason. That's all good info to know. Fortunately I live in zone 6 too. From your comment on how good the stuff looks, I can see that I'm not the only one who thinks it looks great. For a while there I was feeling like I was the only one. Since you don't see hardly any Pampas around here, I think it would make a great specimen planting.

Last question for you. Just to confirm that I'm talking about the same type of Pampas Grass that you are, is the specimen in the picture I attached below, the type of Pampas you're talking about?

Fairway Land & Lawn
06-28-2007, 01:07 AM
That is the stuff......Mine however is dwarf. Will never see the 10'-12' mark. But, looks exactly the same.....

Victor
06-28-2007, 01:42 AM
Now that's what I'd call a specimen plant. You just don't see those around here. Better yet, I know now that I can call Jason every Spring, to come by and cut it back for me. :)

mdvaden
06-28-2007, 03:13 AM
So showy one part of the year here, then kind of a mess the rest of the year.

One of my least favorite plants.

Too much work if its to be maintained properly - if not, it smothers itself.