PDA

View Full Version : Goals


Northernlawn
07-01-2007, 01:37 PM
Did anyone set profit goals,or number of customers they wanted to get in the first years of there business?Would this help in a business plan?

topsites
07-01-2007, 01:42 PM
Yes I think it would help, yes I did.
Goals give us direction, they drive us, thus we need them.

One thing I did thou, to derail the possibility of disappointment is to leave the goals open, that tends to steer us clear of that feeling of failure.

For instance, instead of setting a concrete goal of 50 customers 365 days from now, you could say I would like to have X customers in a year, that sure would be nice, but if it doesn't happen then X customers is still my goal. It should be clear that if you don't come close in twice the time allowed then the plan needs revising or something else might need tuning, see what I'm saying is we're only keeping ourselves from feeling like a failure, don't allow it as a permanent excuse either thou.

If the goal is reached somewhere as intended, close enough might be good enough, closer is better and perfect would be nice, I think one tunes this to one's own personality perhaps, not sure, but I hope you get the idea.

One has to be careful not to water it down too far, so a goal it still is, but water it down just a tad so it doesn't feel like the burn of failure in the odd case should it not work out exactly like that, I think this is ok.

Good luck

Woody82986
07-01-2007, 01:51 PM
Goals require us to put some sort of a plan in motion in order to reach said goals. Goals prevent us from wandering around aimlessly with no sound destination in mind. Goals, in short, are a good thing. It is important to make sure that when you set goals, you realize that the goals you set need to be attainable and not something you would never be able to accomplish in the time you set aside to reach it. Tough goals can be met, but impossible goals very rarely are. Rocognize your limitations and strengths and set your goals accordingly.

Woody82986
07-01-2007, 01:52 PM
I think I set some sort of record for using the word "goal" so many times in one paragraph...

Northernlawn
07-01-2007, 01:56 PM
I'm thinking my goal is only going to be about 10 -15 customers.I plan on doing it part time and keeping my regular job.

txgrassguy
07-01-2007, 02:37 PM
I do not have a set number of clients - what drives my business model is profit margin.
I forecast for 20% and have a sustained margin of about 16% - well above the national average of 7-10%.
How one acquires these forecasts is what separates predictive revenue generation streams from simply toiling all day for nothing.
Due to my business operation, my risk venture benchmark is no longer a 4 which is typical of small businesses. I am solidly a 2 which means banks will finance the purchaser as the business has a supporting revenue generation which is not key employee based.
Three years maximum I will be sold out - have an extremely healthy portfolio and still be younger than 50 years of age. Then it is back to college to teach and work maybe six months out of the year while eying all that young female flesh running around the campus.

Vikings
07-01-2007, 03:03 PM
Yes I think it would help, yes I did.
Goals give us direction, they drive us, thus we need them.

One thing I did thou, to derail the possibility of disappointment is to leave the goals open, that tends to steer us clear of that feeling of failure.

For instance, instead of setting a concrete goal of 50 customers 365 days from now, you could say I would like to have X customers in a year, that sure would be nice, but if it doesn't happen then X customers is still my goal. It should be clear that if you don't come close in twice the time allowed then the plan needs revising or something else might need tuning, see what I'm saying is we're only keeping ourselves from feeling like a failure, don't allow it as a permanent excuse either thou.

If the goal is reached somewhere as intended, close enough might be good enough, closer is better and perfect would be nice, I think one tunes this to one's own personality perhaps, not sure, but I hope you get the idea.

One has to be careful not to water it down too far, so a goal it still is, but water it down just a tad so it doesn't feel like the burn of failure in the odd case should it not work out exactly like that, I think this is ok.

Good luck
Did you copy/paste that from a Brian Tracy book?:laugh:

I agree, goal setting is very good and Eat that Frog is Brian Tracy's best Goal setting book. The audio book is nice too, I listen it as I mow it's like 4 hours long but the book is a fast read.

bohiaa
07-01-2007, 03:21 PM
Did anyone set profit goals,or number of customers they wanted to get in the first years of there business?Would this help in a business plan?

I have never met anyone that didn't have Goals, Especially Personal.


this is a werid post

Woody82986
07-01-2007, 03:56 PM
I have several friends who just wander around rather aimlessly through life, with no goals. They don't understand why they just can't seem to get things ight and make something of themselves...

bohiaa
07-01-2007, 04:05 PM
I have several friends who just wander around rather aimlessly through life, with no goals. They don't understand why they just can't seem to get things ight and make something of themselves...

I guess that's why this seem like a werid post to me....

my childern set goals at the age of 2.

I'm sorry, I just didn't know that people didn't have goals...

Vikings
07-01-2007, 04:09 PM
I have never met anyone that didn't have Goals, Especially Personal.


this is a werid post

Are you kidding? 98% of people don't have written goals and plans to achieve them.

Like topsite said, having a dream in your head is NOT a goal, it's just wishful thinking or a fantasy.

bohiaa
07-01-2007, 06:02 PM
Are you kidding? 98% of people don't have written goals and plans to achieve them.

Like topsite said, having a dream in your head is NOT a goal, it's just wishful thinking or a fantasy.

No... I'm NOT kidding,,,, I guess I dont get around those types of people

LindblomRJ
07-01-2007, 11:59 PM
If you are running a business you need goal. Number of customers, revenue yada, yada, yada.

Part of the business plan will guide you and should help to understand what it takes to achieve those goals. Expenses equipment purchases, fuel, repairs, payroll, marketing and advertising etc.

Or you can use the SWAG method of doing business. However I would not recommend it.

PTP
07-02-2007, 12:35 AM
When I first started, my first year goal was to get 300 customers. I didn't make it. I signed up just over 200 and had about 125 regular accounts. But I never would have made it as high as I did if I didn't have specific goals and a plan to get there.

bohiaa
07-02-2007, 09:21 AM
When I first started, my first year goal was to get 300 customers. I didn't make it. I signed up just over 200 and had about 125 regular accounts. But I never would have made it as high as I did if I didn't have specific goals and a plan to get there.

:clapping: :clapping: :clapping: :clapping: :clapping: :clapping: :clapping:

again, I jsut dont see how people can even live with out them

Vikings
07-02-2007, 03:17 PM
My goal is to get 1000 posts, but I keep getting banned because of my posts in the off topic forums :(

got get rid of the off topic stuff.

Lawn_Boy
07-02-2007, 04:06 PM
My goals for my first season out on my own was to obtain atleast 10 clients and purchase a trailer.

I bought a trailer Friday and I will definitly have over 10 clients by the end of the mowing season!

I would agree that goals are a must.

Vikings
07-02-2007, 05:50 PM
My goals for my first season out on my own was to obtain atleast 10 clients and purchase a trailer.

I bought a trailer Friday and I will definitly have over 10 clients by the end of the mowing season!

I would agree that goals are a must.
Man. 10 clients (almost)? that leaves you 6 days a week to deliver flyers.

americanlawn
07-02-2007, 07:39 PM
Good question. I set goals when I first started my own lawn care business (1990). I projected budgets for pretty much everything. (From late 70's to mid 80's, we had "branch meetings" going over where we we over budget and under budget when I was with ChemLawn Corporation). So I patterned my own company off these budgets. Well, after about 5 years, I quit "budgeting". I soon learned that in order to be profitable, budgets were not much of a factor. Now we judge our business by year end profit. Budgets are fine, but unexpected problems can through them for a loop. Fortunately, we have made a profit every year since day one. The first 3 - 5 years required many 80 - 90 work weeks.........I'm talkin' working Sundays & using headlights to complete the day. Budgets are good, but hard work & long hours make profits.

txgrassguy
07-03-2007, 12:27 AM
Hard work and long hours do not make profits -good business management does.
Do you pay yourself a comparable wage for these long hours?
If not - you are not running a business - you are running a gym.

Grits
07-03-2007, 12:31 AM
Did anyone set profit goals,or number of customers they wanted to get in the first years of there business?Would this help in a business plan?

Sure, just be sure to set your goals low so you won't be disappointed.:laugh:

Really, this is a must, IMO. It probably won't work out the way you plan, but it gives you something to shoot for. I have learned that a Business Plan is a constant work in progress, changing all the time. But it gives you direction.

Tim Wright
07-03-2007, 10:08 PM
Over the past winter I worked on goals, projections, plans, systems of operation, etc. This was the core of it all.

Goals:

1. x # of commercial customers
2. x # of residential customers
3. systems written and in place
4. software for scheduling, tracking, job costing, etc
5. plans for branching into new services
6. planning for a display sales location

Planning

1. Project a High, Middle, Low Cost of overhead based on number of clients, jobs, acreage, equipment etc.
2. Project High, Middle, Low Gross based on the above
3. Project a High, Middle, Low Profit margin based on the above
4. Plan how the equipment will be utilized by crews based on projects and schedule
5. Plans for training and education of myself and employees based on #5 under goals.

I don't think that this covers it all, but I certainly was crank'n the brain.

Having said all of this, this year has been a good/bad year. I messed some things up.

Some of the goals have been met and exceeded. Some are in the works to being met, and some will be revamped for next year and the following year.

Tim

Stillwater
07-05-2007, 02:59 AM
Did anyone set profit goals,or number of customers they wanted to get in the first years of there business?Would this help in a business plan?

Yes this is critical information for a business plan, but as far as profit goals go you need some type of history to be able to effectively factor that into the plan. Personaly what I would do is focos on quality work and adding customers get the word out and as you gain income history you can take those numbers and decide what you need to do to reach your goal.