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stevenf
07-03-2007, 06:15 PM
I just started a lawn business about 3-4 weeks ago. Now I have 3 weekly yards and 2 bi-weekly yards. i have also done 2 cleanup jobs.
Just curious as to how long it took you guys to get on your feet? I still have a job so these five yards have actually started to show profit believe it or now.
How long did it take for the 20-30+ lawns?

kevinlane
07-03-2007, 07:36 PM
Dang....you doin better than me. I've been at it for about 2 months. I have 10 accounts. Done 3 landscapes, (cleanouts, mulch and etc.) So jes keep pressing. Good luck to ya brutha.

privatelawn
07-03-2007, 11:16 PM
Send postcards... if you have good ads you should get about 1%-2% worth of jobs so 1000 postcards = 10-20 customers, 10000 postcards = a full time business

kevinlane
07-04-2007, 12:29 AM
Get 1 or 2 accounts, the neighbors flock to you if you do a good job.

Midwest Lawn Services
07-04-2007, 12:43 AM
I would suggest doing door to door brochures/flyers. I have been at this for 10 years, and still do door to doors when we get a client in a real nice neighborhood. You can never be to big or too experienced to do things as simple as door to doors. If you do an excellent job on their neighbors place, they will call you...the door to door just helps secure the deal! I would say door to door is about 25% cheaper than mass mailings, but takes time. Any ways, after all that babble, try door to door sales, if you have good PR skills, it will be worth the time.

Jay Ray
07-04-2007, 12:53 AM
I still have a job so these five yards have actually started to show profit believe it or now.

If you are going to file a Schedule C with the IRS and you keep all your receipts for every business expense and depreciate your equipment, it is unlikely you will show a profit the first year or two. If you are not keeping complete accurate records you really don't know if you are making a profit or not. You can use your business loss to offset income from your job, so a loss getting started ain't so bad when the bigger tax refund check comes in the spring.

But you are doing fine for the first year. Glad you still have a job but that has nothing to do with your business except to keep the financial stress level down. You are off to a good start.

SSS 18734
07-04-2007, 01:40 AM
When I switched over from my 21" to my 36" walkbehind mid-season I went from 4 customers to 14 in about a month and a half. At the start of the next season, I got it to 21 within the first month - with minimal advertising. Word of mouth really helped me that season.

bohiaa
07-04-2007, 05:13 AM
u guys must b doing something wrong, it took me 2 months, b4 the business turned into a postive cash flo...........

Sandgropher
07-04-2007, 06:48 AM
If you are going to file a Schedule C with the IRS and you keep all your receipts for every business expense and depreciate your equipment, it is unlikely you will show a profit the first year or two. If you are not keeping complete accurate records you really don't know if you are making a profit or not. You can use your business loss to offset income from your job, so a loss getting started ain't so bad when the bigger tax refund check comes in the spring.

But you are doing fine for the first year. Glad you still have a job but that has nothing to do with your business except to keep the financial stress level down. You are off to a good start.


I agree with this, i read a comment the other day that the IRS does not really expect you to make a profit until your 2nd or 3rd year, if you are not doing well by your 3rd- 4 th year you might wish to consider something else.

Lohse's Lawn Service
07-04-2007, 09:42 AM
You have to be patient. It takes time to build a business, but time could be 2 weeks for one person and 2 years for another. It all depends on your quality of work, which may spread your name around through word-of-mouth, and your willingness to go out and get customers. But also, as mentioned above, flyers and business cards will work great. Ask your church if you can post a flyer on the bulletin. Plenty of older folk in the church that are unable to mow the lawn. Good luck and keep working hard.

bohiaa
07-04-2007, 11:37 AM
You have to be patient. It takes time to build a business, but time could be 2 weeks for one person and 2 years for another. It all depends on your quality of work, which may spread your name around through word-of-mouth, and your willingness to go out and get customers. But also, as mentioned above, flyers and business cards will work great. Ask your church if you can post a flyer on the bulletin. Plenty of older folk in the church that are unable to mow the lawn. Good luck and keep working hard.

adding to what he said, I was succussfull, because of the location, seems here there were only a hand full doing it, Providing very poor customer service. And,,,, a big and. I speak english, a lot of the homeowners were scared of some of the mexicians around here,

hang in there, remember to talk to everyone.... Everyone has grass, or knows someone who does...

Uranus
07-04-2007, 11:46 AM
Well up here in the northeast we get a 4 month vacation every year and 90% of customers change companys in the spring. I did 8 weeks in a local paper prior to starting up. Day one of work I had 25 accounts. I was up to 34 by the second week of mowings. Then at the end of my first year I had 46 accounts. 40 weekly cuts and 6 EOW.

Runner
07-04-2007, 12:01 PM
I just started a lawn business about 3-4 weeks ago. .
Just curious as to how long it took you guys to get on your feet?

I've been at it for 23 years, and I'm still working on it. :rolleyes:

Stillwater
07-05-2007, 01:49 AM
to "truely" stand on my feet?...... 5 years