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1MajorTom
07-05-2007, 08:32 PM
So many times on here, I hear the word "professional" thrown around.
"it's not professional if you drive an older truck.", "it's not professional if you wear a tank top when cutting grass.", "you're not a professional if you don't have a website.", "it's not professional if your equipment isn't clean.", and so on and so on.....
But really now, will a grass cutter ever be considered a PROFESSIONAL by the general public?
When I think of professional jobs, I think of doctors, lawyers, nurses, judges, pharmacists, etc, etc, etc.

When I look at SERVICE RELATED workers, I see many of them as hardworking, honest decent guys. But the word professional never enters my mind.

What's your take on this?

TNT LawnCare Inc.
07-05-2007, 08:41 PM
We dont consider ourselves professional's ,just a great LawnCare company that does quality work as a service to the public. But ive had several clients tell me we do professional work:laugh: :waving: Hay Jodi you guys get a lot of rain Yesterday,it finally rained on and off all day yesterday Ya hoo!

fiveoboy01
07-05-2007, 08:43 PM
Well, if you go by Webster's definition:

1. following an occupation as a means of livelihood or for gain: a professional builder.
2. of, pertaining to, or connected with a profession: professional studies.
3. appropriate to a profession: professional objectivity.
4. engaged in one of the learned professions: A lawyer is a professional person.
5. following as a business an occupation ordinarily engaged in as a pastime: a professional golfer.
6. making a business or constant practice of something not properly to be regarded as a business: “A salesman,” he said, “is a professional optimist.”
7. undertaken or engaged in as a means of livelihood or for gain: professional baseball.
8. of or for a professional person or his or her place of business or work: a professional apartment; professional equipment.
9. done by a professional; expert: professional car repairs.
–noun 10. a person who belongs to one of the professions, esp. one of the learned professions.
11. a person who earns a living in a sport or other occupation frequently engaged in by amateurs: a golf professional.
12. an expert player, as of golf or tennis, serving as a teacher, consultant, performer, or contestant; pro.
13. a person who is expert at his or her work: You can tell by her comments that this editor is a real professional.

So technically, anyone who's doing maintenance for $ can be called a professional. I can't speak for the public's perception of us.

Some of the criteria you gave, I think that it would make an outfit look un-professional, but that doesn't mean that they are not.

This is why I'm always whining about image, and keeping my stuff clean, and wearing a company shirt and khakis on every job, remaining clean-shaven and cut, never EVER smoking on a jobsite, etc... IF some of the public has that type of perception, I'd try to do everything I could to reverse that perception, at least when it comes to myself and my business' image.

hess
07-05-2007, 08:47 PM
I don't call my self a professional but i take my job very seriously i try to look better then any one else. Wearing polo shrits and work pants work boots and matching hats. It looks better on yourself when your dressed to the nines and you see someone else wearing shorts, tank tops, flip flopes etc. Some of the people i see i can't beleave that they would want them to do there lawn service.

T Total Lawncare
07-05-2007, 09:03 PM
I think the gist of being a professional in this field is that we do it for money, thus it's a profession. Such is the case in High School and College Sports vs the NFL, NBA and so on. Money makes the difference of it being hobby vs a professional occupation. There are some cases in which you can get paid for services that have to be done, commonly for free if one does it for himself. If not he/she pays someone else to do it. You don't have to wear a suit and tie to be a professional.

Exact Rototilling
07-05-2007, 09:05 PM
Driving through some neighborhoods today I saw some shockingly unprofessional looking Larry lawn mower operators. Equipment looked really haggard, blue smoke from a 4 strokes etc., ply wood sides on very low end trailers. It looks really bad. I would not want to hire them. A shinny new truck is not required but getting rid on the rust on my own Truck would be a good move. I looks tired and it concerns me. I appear to the public as clean cut and I handle myself professionally and I believe this makes up for the embarrassment of my my older tired truck. I doesn't look horrible but it does have some rust in the fenders. Yes I need to work on this Truck some more or buy a newer full size truck regardless.

Would you want to hire an attractive professional acting person to work your Latte' stand or a scary toothless, greasy haired stinky person who lacks the skills to deal with people? I'm not trying to be a jerk but people do judge appearances to a large degree. If you look like a beaten down Larry lawnmower weekend warrior even if you have a business lic & insurance - do you really expect to grow your business when compared to someone else?

Yes some of these operators are probably struggling financially to operate even with money under the table. Life is cruel at times but we need to deal with it and move on.

Liquidfast
07-05-2007, 09:11 PM
Driving through some neighborhoods today I saw some shockingly unprofessional looking Larry lawn mower operators. Equipment looked really haggard, blue smoke from a 4 strokes etc., ply wood sides on very low end trailers. It looks really bad. I would not want to hire them. A shinny new truck is not required but getting rid on the rust on my own Truck would be a good move. I looks tired and it concerns me. I appear to the public as clean cut and I handle myself professionally and I believe this makes up for the embarrassment of my my older tired truck. I doesn't look horrible but it does have some rust in the fenders. Yes I need to work on this Truck some more or buy a newer full size truck regardless.

Would you want to hire an attractive professional acting person to work your Latte' stand or a scary toothless, greasy haired stinky person who lacks the skills to deal with people? I'm not trying to be a jerk but people do judge appearances to a large degree. If you look like a beaten down Larry lawnmower weekend warrior even if you have a business lic & insurance - do you really expect to grow your business when compared to someone else?

Yes some of these operators are probably struggling financially to operate even with money under the table. Life is cruel at times but we need to deal with it and move on.



I for one would want the toothless skany guy so I can give him a $5 and have him make change for a $20 after a few choice words. He wouldn't last long but I could make a couple hun while he lasts. Thats just me though.

grasswhacker
07-05-2007, 09:24 PM
We could call ourselves "Lawn Specialists"

1MajorTom
07-05-2007, 10:08 PM
Hay Jodi you guys get a lot of rain Yesterday,it finally rained on and off all day yesterday Ya hoo!
We didn't get any yesterday, but today it came down in buckets, and now it's raining again this evening. :clapping:

nlminc
07-05-2007, 10:22 PM
I've been in business for almost 20 years....the bottom line is price with 95% of the people out there. I've been in business in the NE(Cape Cod)and here in Atlanta ove those years. I've had some people on ocean front properties on CC freak out when they saw my lettered truck pull up for a quote. One guy was expecting a college kid!

Here in Atlanta there are many pro companies and but like the other day I passed a box truck in a 1+ mil sub division that was lettered "Cheap Lawn Mowing" in very large bold lettering with the co phone #!! They are pulling them in and working........

I really don't think most people really care if you have the shirts, hats, ins. and lettering. I've seen so much bs over the years.....people beating me up over a dollar or two because some half azz company is in the neighborhood undercutting everyone.

puppypaws
07-05-2007, 10:51 PM
Well, if you go by Webster's definition:

1. following an occupation as a means of livelihood or for gain: a professional builder.
2. of, pertaining to, or connected with a profession: professional studies.
3. appropriate to a profession: professional objectivity.
4. engaged in one of the learned professions: A lawyer is a professional person.
5. following as a business an occupation ordinarily engaged in as a pastime: a professional golfer.
6. making a business or constant practice of something not properly to be regarded as a business: “A salesman,” he said, “is a professional optimist.”
7. undertaken or engaged in as a means of livelihood or for gain: professional baseball.
8. of or for a professional person or his or her place of business or work: a professional apartment; professional equipment.
9. done by a professional; expert: professional car repairs.
–noun 10. a person who belongs to one of the professions, esp. one of the learned professions.
11. a person who earns a living in a sport or other occupation frequently engaged in by amateurs: a golf professional.
12. an expert player, as of golf or tennis, serving as a teacher, consultant, performer, or contestant; pro.
13. a person who is expert at his or her work: You can tell by her comments that this editor is a real professional.

So technically, anyone who's doing maintenance for $ can be called a professional. I can't speak for the public's perception of us.

Some of the criteria you gave, I think that it would make an outfit look un-professional, but that doesn't mean that they are not.

This is why I'm always whining about image, and keeping my stuff clean, and wearing a company shirt and khakis on every job, remaining clean-shaven and cut, never EVER smoking on a jobsite, etc... IF some of the public has that type of perception, I'd try to do everything I could to reverse that perception, at least when it comes to myself and my business' image.

You have the exact meaning and the correct outlook, you are a professional.

Mike Blevins
07-05-2007, 11:14 PM
The name of my business is Blevins Professional Lawn Care. When I advertise locally I feel that just the name alone gets me a few extra calls. Its really the only thing I could come up with at the time. I have considered changing names. I do feel though that in a way I am a professional. I think that there are certain ways you carry yourself and promote a good image has to do with being a "professional". That goes along with clean equipment and reliabiltiy. It has alot to do with personality as well as knowledge of the "profession". There are many ways to be a professional.

BMLS
07-05-2007, 11:19 PM
I've been in business for over 20 years and I still wear shorts and a company cutoff shirt. In my experience people don't care what you look like. It is how much you can do the job for and make it look good. Bottom line is $$$. I am located in Somerset County NJ working on $800-$1mill houses.

DuraCutter
07-05-2007, 11:30 PM
I've been in business for almost 20 years....the bottom line is price with 95% of the people out there. I've been in business in the NE(Cape Cod)and here in Atlanta ove those years. I've had some people on ocean front properties on CC freak out when they saw my lettered truck pull up for a quote. One guy was expecting a college kid!

Here in Atlanta there are many pro companies and but like the other day I passed a box truck in a 1+ mil sub division that was lettered "Cheap Lawn Mowing" in very large bold lettering with the co phone #!! They are pulling them in and working........

I really don't think most people really care if you have the shirts, hats, ins. and lettering. I've seen so much bs over the years.....people beating me up over a dollar or two because some half azz company is in the neighborhood undercutting everyone.

Jodi, here's your answer. No matter how anyone tries to make it a profession or matches all workers, mowing is looked at as a necessary evil by most homeowners and like I've said many times before, residential will cry over 1 dollar. It's the nature of the beast when they are spending their hard earned money.

It's just a service with "joey" written all over it, and that's the perception out there, not me making it up.

:)

Fantasy Lawns
07-06-2007, 01:35 AM
This is late ..... n I'm tired ... but with all sides of the coin the only way I can relate to the term "professional" is that


Fore the last 15 years .... I have made my main stay of income thru this "business" ... I have helped many people gain income thru this "business" .... have provided a .... service .... to my "customers"

Over the coarse of those last 15 years ... I've had ..n have at this moment ... 4 men ...families ... whom provide a decent income to those families .... raise children n grand-children ... help thru their own "life" ... made many mistakes ....n many positive impressions to those around me ....

Have my own direction towards what is "professional" ... stood the coarse of time .... n survived ... ssoo far .. provide a solid tax base to both my employees .... country ...n service to my customers .... feel good of my self ....n have faith in the American Dream


WOW ... that's a few too many cocktails ....aahh Friday .... NO biggy ... only behind 1/2 a day

Oh .... n as a Professional Service ... I provide such a service ... M-F .... 8-5 .... 365 year .... rain or shine .. hott or "cool" .... as my only source of income

NOT to cut on those making "some extra" income ... I CAN relate too that ... n they can act "Pro" ....

Have the heart of it ...Look it ...Feel it ... n dream of doing it ... alone .... 1 day ....

BUT ...When this is it ... n ALL of it ...Kinda got more on the line ... ya know .... house .... food ... bills ....

Those kinda things

THIS is how I pay ALL my bills

patterson
07-06-2007, 06:45 AM
Here's the way I look at it.

I only mow 2-3 days per week and the remainder is fertilization and weed control. I approach mowing just as I do the treatment work and here's what I've told a lot of my customers. I know as much about turf as a doctor knows about the body, as a lawyer knows about the law. When I'm sick I go to the doctor and he figures out what's wrong and how to fix it. When the lawn is sick, the doctor calls me, I figure out what's wrong and how to fix it.

Personally, I don't see much difference between the two. Unfortunately, doctors have a lot better marketing through television dramas. If they don't know what's wrong with you it's a medical mystery. If I don't know what's wrong with the lawn, I'm an idiot. Just because society says those jobs are worth more than yours doesn't make it true.

rodfather
07-06-2007, 07:21 AM
When I think of professional jobs, I think of doctors, lawyers, nurses, judges, pharmacists, etc, etc, etc.

When I look at SERVICE RELATED workers, I see many of them as hardworking, honest decent guys. But the word professional never enters my mind.

What's your take on this?

The difference Jodi is all these professions require certified training, exams, and some also require advanced degrees.

nobagger
07-06-2007, 07:58 AM
IMO, its all of the things you had mentioned before, clean truck, clean equipment, clean and neat apperence and actual knowledge of what your doing. Of those things I mentioned, I think it all starts with first impressions. Our location is flooded with lawn care companies and I dont think there's anything more unprofessional than shirtless employee's with smokes hanging out of their mouths which seems to be a trend around here. Now there have been jobs where my guys take off the shirts but it was in a back yard and 90 degrees with 80% humidity and the job is 95% completed, what can ya really say at that point but it makes me kinda grit my teeth for some reason. Just my .02 cents.

delphied
07-06-2007, 08:16 AM
Cost of service is number one in my area. Doesnt matter how wealthy they are,As a matter of fact, its the working class who are better about paying and tipping than the docs and lawyers. They dont care about your shirt or truck or anything but the price.

ShaneG757
07-06-2007, 08:16 AM
If asked what is the oldest profession in the book, the common answer is prostitution. Any job that someone does for money and does said job very well can be considered a professional.

Tharrell
07-06-2007, 09:08 AM
"Professional" does bring up images of something other than little johnny down the street. Maybe "Expert" would be a better term?
We use the word professional because it's what we do for a living. But, we are all "Experts". We know ahead of time what will happen if we cut the grass too short in July etc...
I myself am considered a Professional Expert!

Roger
07-06-2007, 11:21 PM
I expect to be flamed out, but my take is a bit different than most here. I cringe when reading the reasons why grass cutters are "professional." Some of the reasons are pretty silly, "... need impact wrench," " ... clean clothes," and the list goes on. Clearly, one definition includes the work being accomplished by an individual.

However, to me none of us who mow lawns, spread mulch, trim bushes, and the like are "professional." I reserve the term for somebody who is is uniquely educated and holds credentials for what they do. A registered engineer who has completed a higher education, and has passed Board certifications for practicing is a professional. The accountant who has completed a college degree in accounting, and has passed the accounting Board exams is a professional. An attorney who has attended law school, and has passed the Bar exams is a professional. Medical doctors, veterinarians, teachers, nurses, financial advisers, stock brokers, and the like all carry certain certifications that attest to their expertise.

Grass cutters hold no special education or training, and do not hold any credentials for mowing grass. To suggest that we are experts in mowing, hence a professional, is a real stretch. For me, none of the elements of image (e.g. shiny truck, matching shirt/cap, impact wrench in the tool box) means nothing regarding being considered a "professional."

For those who go beyond the mundane tasks of mowing, mulching, trimming, etc, and hold degrees in horticulture, that is a different matter.

puppypaws
07-06-2007, 11:56 PM
I expect to be flamed out, but my take is a bit different than most here. I cringe when reading the reasons why grass cutters are "professional." Some of the reasons are pretty silly, "... need impact wrench," " ... clean clothes," and the list goes on. Clearly, one definition includes the work being accomplished by an individual.

However, to me none of us who mow lawns, spread mulch, trim bushes, and the like are "professional." I reserve the term for somebody who is is uniquely educated and holds credentials for what they do. A registered engineer who has completed a higher education, and has passed Board certifications for practicing is a professional. The accountant who has completed a college degree in accounting, and has passed the accounting Board exams is a professional. An attorney who has attended law school, and has passed the Bar exams is a professional. Medical doctors, veterinarians, teachers, nurses, financial advisers, stock brokers, and the like all carry certain certifications that attest to their expertise.

Grass cutters hold no special education or training, and do not hold any credentials for mowing grass. To suggest that we are experts in mowing, hence a professional, is a real stretch. For me, none of the elements of image (e.g. shiny truck, matching shirt/cap, impact wrench in the tool box) means nothing regarding being considered a "professional."

For those who go beyond the mundane tasks of mowing, mulching, trimming, etc, and hold degrees in horticulture, that is a different matter.

Professional football, basketball, baseball, golf or even car racing have no degree or education, it is a learned skill but they make money so they are called a professional.

The exact meaning is below:

Conforming to the standards of a profession: professional behavior.
Engaging in a given activity as a source of livelihood or as a career: a professional writer.
Performed by persons receiving pay: professional football.
Having or showing great skill; expert: a professional repair job.

A person following a profession, especially a learned profession.
One who earns a living in a given or implied occupation: hired a professional to decorate the house.
A skilled practitioner; an expert.

1MajorTom
07-07-2007, 12:15 AM
Roger is great with words. I agree with everything he has said.

Roger
07-07-2007, 12:22 AM
The sports figures have natural talents and abilities, beyond what 99.999% of the rest of us possess. Their demonstrated skills are above "learned." Yes, they have honed themselves, but their performance is further than merely learning.

Out of the seven meanings, only one applies, "One who earns a living ...." The first four are adjectives, not nouns. The fifth one does not apply, since there is basically no learning involved (read a few posts on getting new hired people started working). And, the last one (seventh) one does not apply either, and there is no expertise.

So, I will give you the sixth one, but I will not use that definition in my language. I have too much respect for those who truly earned the designation. For me, using the term in our industry for the mundane tasks minimizes the value of the term.

Actually, the sixth one may not apply to very many doing the mundane tasks anyway. The "earning a living" phrase seems like a goal for some, but one that is never realized. Rather, for some, the work is merely "something to do," and never is able to reach the level of making enough money to call the work "earning a living." When somebody asks me "... do you cut grass for a living," I tell them "no." There is not enough money out of the effort to be called "earning a living."

puppypaws
07-07-2007, 12:23 AM
[QUOTE=1MajorTom;1888429]Roger is great with words. I agree with everything he has said.[/QUOTE

Dictionaries are not known for correctness.

HOOLIE
07-07-2007, 12:26 AM
Roger don't sell yourself short, you're the consummate pro as far as I'm concerned :)

coonman
07-07-2007, 01:08 AM
I don't think people even give a second thought to what you are wearing to cut their lawn, alot of them are not even home anyway. Think of this from the consumers side. When they mowed their own lawn or when their neighbor is out mowing his or her lawn, or when we mow our own lawn. What is being worn? I would say most of the time, old sneakers, old tshirt or sleeveless and 99% of the time shorts are worn in hot weather. I know if I hired someone to mow my lawn, and I looked out and saw them wearing what I would be wearing (shorts, tshirt etc) that would be fine by me and I am sure most other homeowners think the same on this. As far as clean mowers and such, nobody cares as long as you are showing up and doing a good job. My mower has been filthy after the first soggy lawn of the day over the last month of record rains. Nobody cared or even noticed. I don't think we will ever be considered a real professional by most, because in their mind the little 14 year old grandson can mow the lawn also. Which is true, he can mow it but not as good as we can. I think most people consider lawn work as a job that anyone can do if they want to. I read an email joke the other day, it was talking about those annoying emails form the school reunion sites, one of the punch lines was I don't need to look up info about the captain of our high school football team, I know where he is, he is out mowing my lawn. Sad but true. People just don't get. Thats alright though, if they want to pay me a dollar or two a minute to walk around in their yard and listen to tunes, I will take it.

fiveoboy01
07-07-2007, 01:16 AM
For me, using the term in our industry for the mundane tasks minimizes the value of the term.




The value of the term as it is percieved by yourself.

Fortunately, Webster's does not differentiate between different occupations when providing the definition of the word.

Your perception is just that and you're certainly entitled to it. I respect your opinion though I don't agree with it.

bohiaa
07-07-2007, 09:15 AM
So many times on here, I hear the word "professional" thrown around.
"it's not professional if you drive an older truck.", "it's not professional if you wear a tank top when cutting grass.", "you're not a professional if you don't have a website.", "it's not professional if your equipment isn't clean.", and so on and so on.....
But really now, will a grass cutter ever be considered a PROFESSIONAL by the general public?
When I think of professional jobs, I think of doctors, lawyers, nurses, judges, pharmacists, etc, etc, etc.

When I look at SERVICE RELATED workers, I see many of them as hardworking, honest decent guys. But the word professional never enters my mind.

What's your take on this?


I think you really open up a can of worms here,

the word PROFESSIONAL means someone that does it all day every day for quite some time. refering to a curt of law, If I were called in to testify I could give my oppion on lawn card as a PROFESSIONAL.

It doenst mean clean machines, any person can have clean equiptment, that means they have clean equiptment,
If they wera a tank top, that means they wear a tank top,
If you drive an older truck that means you have an older truck.

iluvscag
07-07-2007, 09:56 AM
We could call ourselves "Lawn Specialists"

Almost like mine Commercial Maintenance Technician

JohnsonLawn
07-07-2007, 10:48 AM
Let me gets this straight, if I go out and get a degree or certificate in Hort or Turf Management, then I can call myself a professional. I have been running and growing this business from infancy for 8 years now and am proud of it. I have a family, $400,000 home, several vehicles and live a decent life because of the business that I created. I have several nieces and nephews with 2-4 year college degrees working at Dunkin Donuts now and a 32 year old neighbor with a degree in child psychology living with her boyfriend in her parents basement. Well, at least at the end of the day they can call themselves "Professionals". Can you folks see where I am going with this!

puppypaws
07-07-2007, 11:40 AM
I think you really open up a can of worms here,

the word PROFESSIONAL means someone that does it all day every day for quite some time. refering to a curt of law, If I were called in to testify I could give my oppion on lawn card as a PROFESSIONAL.

It doenst mean clean machines, any person can have clean equiptment, that means they have clean equiptment,
If they wera a tank top, that means they wear a tank top,
If you drive an older truck that means you have an older truck.

The old Major just wanted to get a little controversy started, that is good it gets people thinking and keeps Alzheimer's from setting in so quickly. A little discussion is good for the mind it causes people to activate a few more brain cells.

MTR999
07-07-2007, 01:02 PM
Let me gets this straight, if I go out and get a degree or certificate in Hort or Turf Management, then I can call myself a professional. I have been running and growing this business from infancy for 8 years now and am proud of it. I have a family, $400,000 home, several vehicles and live a decent life because of the business that I created. I have several nieces and nephews with 2-4 year college degrees working at Dunkin Donuts now and a 32 year old neighbor with a degree in child psychology living with her boyfriend in her parents basement. Well, at least at the end of the day they can call themselves "Professionals". Can you folks see where I am going with this!

Same here, lots of "expensive" college people who couldn't find a job to support their so-called "pro" lifestyle, and it is gonna get worse. One of my accounts has daughter dating a so-called pro wrestler guy who have degree in sport therapy or some sort but both DO live in her parents' ext car garage room...yeah pro, saving rent money for steroid, I guess.

JohnsonLawn
07-07-2007, 01:23 PM
I understand what some are saying about Doctors, Lawyers, etc. getting a degree and having successful careers. They are professionals, but in my opinion, anyone in this world who starts a business from NOTHING, succeeds at keeping it profitable over the long haul and can make a comfortable living doing it, has indeed earned the right to call themselves "Professionals". Degree or no degree! There are tons of wealthy people out there with no formal education and plenty of common sense and there are tons of people with Masters Degrees with absolutely NO common sense! Nuff said!:usflag:

lawnjockey56
07-07-2007, 01:38 PM
So many times on here, I hear the word "professional" thrown around.
"it's not professional if you drive an older truck.", "it's not professional if you wear a tank top when cutting grass.", "you're not a professional if you don't have a website.", "it's not professional if your equipment isn't clean.", and so on and so on.....
But really now, will a grass cutter ever be considered a PROFESSIONAL by the general public?
When I think of professional jobs, I think of doctors, lawyers, nurses, judges, pharmacists, etc, etc, etc.

When I look at SERVICE RELATED workers, I see many of them as hardworking, honest decent guys. But the word professional never enters my mind.

What's your take on this?
i consider myself a professional from the moment i wake up and load my professional grade equipment into my professional grade trailer from my professional workshop i had custom built to store it all in. then i get into my truck with my professional route which is generated by my professional software and i have professionally routed my route to save time and fuel. this all continues in every aspect of my day. such as what will save me time on each yard by mowing a certain way, trimming around the house etc. i put too much work and effort into my business to be thought of anything else but a professional lawn service.

lawnjockey56
07-07-2007, 01:45 PM
next time you visit lawn site read the logo "professional growing together"

1MajorTom
07-07-2007, 01:52 PM
Calling ourselves professional grasscutters sounds like a "feelgood". Almost like t-ball games for 6 yr olds. No one gets out, no score is kept, and everyone on the team gets to bat every inning. :dizzy:

lawnjockey56
07-07-2007, 01:55 PM
Calling ourselves professional grasscutters sounds like a "feelgood". Almost like t-ball games for 6 yr olds. No one gets out, no score is kept, and everyone on the team gets to bat every inning. :dizzy:

i guess if you do a less than professional job that's how you feel-all i know is i am 3rd generation professional lawn service and i know for a fact i am a professional.

delphied
07-07-2007, 02:11 PM
Boy are you guys sensitive or what?

puppypaws
07-07-2007, 02:23 PM
Boy are you guys sensitive or what?

They are not sensitive, just having a good time. You get sensitive when your chemo doesn't work.

JohnsonLawn
07-07-2007, 03:06 PM
next time you visit lawn site read the logo "professional growing together"

Great call on the logo Lawnjockey56:laugh:


Maybe the logo should read:

Lawnsite.com
"LawnBoys, Hoping to be Professionals, so please don't take us serious"

:laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

JohnsonLawn
07-07-2007, 03:11 PM
Oh no, looks like Lesco is going to have to change their logo also. What is a Turf Care "Professional"? Wonder how many sponsors here have advertising geared towards the "Professional" LCO, you know mowers, fert, trimmers, etc. Hhmmm, kinda strange.:laugh:

fiveoboy01
07-07-2007, 03:23 PM
Calling ourselves professional grasscutters sounds like a "feelgood". Almost like t-ball games for 6 yr olds. No one gets out, no score is kept, and everyone on the team gets to bat every inning. :dizzy:

Sorry Jodi, but I just don't agree. There's nothing wrong with those of us who think of ourselves as professionals. It's not a "feelgood" tactic, it's how I view my business and how it's run, and I know others think this way too. If someone doesn't want to think of it that way, well fine by me.

In any case, there has always seemed to be two seperate schools of thought on this issue, and well I guess that's how it always will be. Fair enough:)

befnme
07-07-2007, 06:19 PM
So many times on here, I hear the word "professional" thrown around.
"it's not professional if you drive an older truck.", "it's not professional if you wear a tank top when cutting grass.", "you're not a professional if you don't have a website.", "it's not professional if your equipment isn't clean.", and so on and so on.....
But really now, will a grass cutter ever be considered a PROFESSIONAL by the general public?
When I think of professional jobs, I think of doctors, lawyers, nurses, judges, pharmacists, etc, etc, etc.

When I look at SERVICE RELATED workers, I see many of them as hardworking, honest decent guys. But the word professional never enters my mind.

What's your take on this?

around here our newspaper does "the best of sampson county" once a year. i asked the lady last year if this year she could include "profesional lawn companies" i know i used the "p" word, lol. any way she said she might. well this years votes have been cast and guess what was NOT on the ballot,,,, AGAIN. i guess that tells me what they think of our kind.

puppypaws
07-07-2007, 07:12 PM
around here our newspaper does "the best of sampson county" once a year. i asked the lady last year if this year she could include "profesional lawn companies" i know i used the "p" word, lol. any way she said she might. well this years votes have been cast and guess what was NOT on the ballot,,,, AGAIN. i guess that tells me what they think of our kind.

No, that just means they are ignorant to your profession. It is the exact same way with farming, people have no idea where their food comes from, they think it is brought into their grocery store by the food phantom.

Now, that is an interesting thought, farming is the only profession that mankind cannot do without, no food, no existence.

WJW Lawn
07-07-2007, 08:21 PM
Im trying to keep my Amateur status...and taking money would ruin those chances of ever getting a medal in the 1 Acre dash. So...no professionals here.

Geez, is this really a GD thread??