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Big E
07-10-2007, 08:57 AM
I'm looking to buy a Dixie Chopper. Would you recommend a Kohler or Generac engine and why? One is a 50"cut with a 20 hp Kohler (40 hrs.) for $4500 and the other is a 60" cut with a 27 hp Generac (45 hrs.) for $6000. Which would you buy?

Big E

gavin478
07-10-2007, 01:40 PM
I would go with the kohler. their more commonly used throughout the mowing world, which means greater availability and cheaper parts. Kohler Command engines are some of the best out there, and should last you well over the 2000 hour mark.

Big E
07-10-2007, 01:52 PM
Thanks, the dealer said they have yet to work on a Generac in the 2 or 3 years they have had them on the Dixie. What type of blowers and trimmers, etc. do you use?

MOW PRO LAWN SERVICE
07-10-2007, 01:54 PM
I would go with the generac.

dmanb2b
07-10-2007, 02:08 PM
imho generac=generic. doesn;t mean it's inferior, you just have no clue who built it...maintain it and you should be fine

saw man
07-10-2007, 02:27 PM
Briggs ownes Generac

Richard Martin
07-10-2007, 02:31 PM
imho generac=generic. doesn;t mean it's inferior, you just have no clue who built it...maintain it and you should be fine


Generac engines are built by Generac here in the US. Generac is much better known in the generator world and that is where their engines started, as generator engines. Dixie approached them a few years ago and they colaborated on engine development for mowers. The complaints were many at first but seem to have dwindled as time went on and the problems were ironed out.

cybervision
07-10-2007, 02:32 PM
Don't stay away from 60" machine because of the Generac engine. Parts should not be an issue. They make a great engine. I have a 17,000 watt Generac Whole House Generator. It has a 30 Hp Generac engine. I did extensive research prior to purchasing it (And no it did not come from Home Depot). The Generac engine is manufactured for 3000 Hrs. They are not as well know but have been around for many of years. They claim one of their lines became the Vanguard Engine. Check out their web SITE.

http://www.generac.com/PublicPDFs/0170580SBY.pdf

Big E
07-10-2007, 02:38 PM
What about blowers and trimmers as far as reliability?

cybervision
07-10-2007, 02:45 PM
I don't think Briggs owns Generac. Generac sold their portable line of generators to Briggs a year or so ago. An earlier engine looks like it became the Vanguard.

Big E
07-10-2007, 02:51 PM
How do you charge for a commecial job? Is there some kind of formula?

gavin478
07-10-2007, 06:16 PM
#1, blowers and trimmers. Stick with the big 3, stihl, echo, and redmax and you're guaranteed a great machine. I use stihl trimmers and echo blowers and have yet to have any major problems. Alot of guys love their stihl br600's, but I'm currently using an echo 603 and it's never let me down.

#2 Charging for a commercial job. We'll first what are your costs? Truck, equipment, taxes, gas, repairs, parts, trailer, insurance, advertising, labor. Only then can you really see how much you need to charge. The 'ideal' operator pulls in at least $60 an hour.

puppypaws
07-10-2007, 09:09 PM
Don't stay away from 60" machine because of the Generac engine. Parts should not be an issue. They make a great engine. I have a 17,000 watt Generac Whole House Generator. It has a 30 Hp Generac engine. I did extensive research prior to purchasing it (And no it did not come from Home Depot). The Generac engine is manufactured for 3000 Hrs. They are not as well know but have been around for many of years. They claim one of their lines became the Vanguard Engine. Check out their web SITE.

http://www.generac.com/PublicPDFs/0170580SBY.pdf

Does that handle everthing in the house with the same quality as your electric service?

Dave Carney
07-10-2007, 09:32 PM
I have the same one. It handles everything on those circuits. Comes with 12 circuits, most houses have a lot more than that so you pick the critical ones. Then, if you need to run something thats not on one of the 12, you would just need to string an extension cord. My Guardian ran for about 9 days straight one winter in an ice storm. We ran everything we needed -well pump, heat, appliances, garage door openers, lights, everything, right down to the treadmill.

puppypaws
07-10-2007, 09:47 PM
I have the same one. It handles everything on those circuits. Comes with 12 circuits, most houses have a lot more than that so you pick the critical ones. Then, if you need to run something thats not on one of the 12, you would just need to string an extension cord. My Guardian ran for about 9 days straight one winter in an ice storm. We ran everything we needed -well pump, heat, appliances, garage door openers, lights, everything, right down to the treadmill.

That is a nice feeling to know you have backup, what kind of fuel does it run?

I have a 110 KW with a 606 John Deere diesel powering it on my farm with a automatic transfer switch to run my chicken houses. I need to run a line to my house and put a transfer switch in because it will handle the chickens and everything in my house all at one time without any problem. We just don't have many power outages in this area and I have been slow about getting it done.

Dave Carney
07-10-2007, 10:07 PM
It runs off our 500g propane tank. They come from the factory set up for ng but it's just a quick jet change and a turn of the screwdriver to convert to propane. That Generac engine runs like a top, really a nice unit, no problems at all.

puppypaws
07-10-2007, 10:23 PM
It runs off our 500g propane tank. They come from the factory set up for ng but it's just a quick jet change and a turn of the screwdriver to convert to propane. That Generac engine runs like a top, really a nice unit, no problems at all.

In the nine days it ran how much propane did it use and does it have a manual transfer switch. I would think manual would be fine because the automatic transfer switches are extremely expensive.

I have got to have automatic on the chickens houses because in 20 minutes there would be 75,000 dead chickens. The houses are solid walls with 10" of insulation and if the fans stop pulling air through the houses they run out of oxygen very quickly.

You talking about something that could give you a heart attack just walk in and see 25,000 dead chickens. I have never seen this but I know several people that have.

cybervision
07-11-2007, 09:12 AM
Sorry to switch this string over to generators, but it does give you more background on Generac.

I have my 16,000 installed with a 200 amp Service Entrance Transfer switch. (Sorry I said before it was 17,000) I am running on natural gas so that reduces the output to 15,000 watts (62.5 amps 240 Volts). With this transfer switch the entire electric service is switched from utility to back-up. It takes about 20 seconds from the time the power goes down until the house is on back-up. When power is restored the switch-over is so fast that you can only see the slightest flicker from the lights. It is hardly noticeable. No effect on any other items.
The generator has plenty of power and the engine is very responsive to changing power demands. This part is different than standard engine on the Dixie Chopper though. The generator uses an electronic servo governor. It response time is so much faster. It has the governor wide open when the demand goes up long before the engines rpm drop. Standard spring governors apply more power as the rpm drop.
As far as power I have had running at once the following: 4 ton central air, 2 hp pool pump, electric clothes dryer and whatever else was on in the house. I needed that much on to get close to the max amperage of 62. There was still some power left. Normally, though I would not run that much on it. The more you run the more it cost. I figure on NG it is about 4 times as much as the electric company. Plus why use at max load if it is not needed.

puppypaws
07-11-2007, 12:19 PM
Sorry to switch this string over to generators, but it does give you more background on Generac.

I have my 16,000 installed with a 200 amp Service Entrance Transfer switch. (Sorry I said before it was 17,000) I am running on natural gas so that reduces the output to 15,000 watts (62.5 amps 240 Volts). With this transfer switch the entire electric service is switched from utility to back-up. It takes about 20 seconds from the time the power goes down until the house is on back-up. When power is restored the switch-over is so fast that you can only see the slightest flicker from the lights. It is hardly noticeable. No effect on any other items.
The generator has plenty of power and the engine is very responsive to changing power demands. This part is different than standard engine on the Dixie Chopper though. The generator uses an electronic servo governor. It response time is so much faster. It has the governor wide open when the demand goes up long before the engines rpm drop. Standard spring governors apply more power as the rpm drop.
As far as power I have had running at once the following: 4 ton central air, 2 hp pool pump, electric clothes dryer and whatever else was on in the house. I needed that much on to get close to the max amperage of 62. There was still some power left. Normally, though I would not run that much on it. The more you run the more it cost. I figure on NG it is about 4 times as much as the electric company. Plus why use at max load if it is not needed.

Thank you, that is very interesting information.

Dave Carney
07-11-2007, 12:24 PM
In the nine days it ran how much propane did it use and does it have a manual transfer switch. I would think manual would be fine because the automatic transfer switches are extremely expensive.

I have got to have automatic on the chickens houses because in 20 minutes there would be 75,000 dead chickens. The houses are solid walls with 10" of insulation and if the fans stop pulling air through the houses they run out of oxygen very quickly.

You talking about something that could give you a heart attack just walk in and see 25,000 dead chickens. I have never seen this but I know several people that have.

It comes with the automatic transfer switch built into a new panel (as part of the package) which permanently houses the 12 emergency circuits that used to be in the house panel. It used about 1.6 gallons per hour because we only averaged <50% load. Ended up costing us about $450 or so in fuel for 9 days. It was quite expensive but I would have happily paid double or triple...over half the city was darkened, it was super cold, super nasty, and aside from the cost of the propane, didn't affect us at all, business as usual.

Yeah, 25,000 dead chickens that would be bad and heart breaking too I would imagine.