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Newscape
07-16-2007, 07:50 PM
I am wondering if anyone has some advice on installing circle packs. I have never done one myself. I am looking at the possiblity of doing approx 25 ft diameter patio. Can you combine packs to get this much area? Is the installation alot slower? I'm used to laying out in one direction, not round and round, I'm already getting a little dizzy.

MJM landscaping
07-16-2007, 09:23 PM
I just did my first one. I did a 10'7" circle pak and added another 2 layers to get me to the 12' diameter. It went pretty good. I got the diagram layout from the manufactor. All the different shapes and when to use them. That takes the longest time. Also the gaps were a little big for my taste but it came out decent. Here is a pic.. in progress.

Newscape
07-16-2007, 09:38 PM
I just did my first one. I did a 10'7" circle pak and added another 2 layers to get me to the 12' diameter. It went pretty good. I got the diagram layout from the manufactor. All the different shapes and when to use them. That takes the longest time. Also the gaps were a little big for my taste but it came out decent. Here is a pic.. in progress.

Looks great. Were the additional layers from a circle pack too? What manufacturer is the block?

steve in Pa.
07-17-2007, 12:17 AM
is that limestone dust that patio is sitting on???? looks good beside the base with limestone dust!

ChampionLS
07-17-2007, 12:20 AM
I see STONE DUST! quick... somebody call the Paver Police!

MJM landscaping
07-17-2007, 11:54 AM
3/4" crushed rock 6" deep, 1" stonedust screeded, pavers, poly locking sand.
They are Transpave Saint-Malo circle pack.

lawnkid
07-17-2007, 06:35 PM
There are about 5 things I can count that are wrong with that job. Still waiting for Chris to jump in and explain why stone dust is not a suitable base. And it's not just the stone dust, #57's too.... You don't even have to take the ICPI class to know why stone dust is unsuitable. It's been discussed her only a dozen or so times..... :hammerhead:

NewHorizon's Land
07-17-2007, 09:10 PM
Newscape: Most manufactures have circle kits along with extensions. The pavers are pre-cut and is like putting a puzzle together. You have to have the right piece or it wont fit right. Be sure to use the proper installation materials and techniques and you should not have a problem.

MJM landscaping
07-18-2007, 07:42 PM
There are about 5 things I can count that are wrong with that job. Still waiting for Chris to jump in and explain why stone dust is not a suitable base. And it's not just the stone dust, #57's too.... You don't even have to take the ICPI class to know why stone dust is unsuitable. It's been discussed her only a dozen or so times.....

Do you see the 3/4" crushed stone there chief?

lawnkid
07-18-2007, 10:57 PM
I see a lot of cleans and no fines??? Could be a bad picture but there are still a couple errors I see....

MJM landscaping
07-20-2007, 10:02 AM
lawnkid I see a lot of cleans and no fines??? Could be a bad picture but there are still a couple errors I see....

dont be scared speak up

Henry
07-20-2007, 07:54 PM
What he's saying is you shouldn't have used 3/4 clean for your base.

kemmer
07-20-2007, 08:03 PM
besides the fact that he used 3/4 clean instead of QP for his base, whats wrong with using stone dust as the bedding base?

MowingisMaddness
07-21-2007, 01:48 AM
Circles are pretty easy to install. We don't follow a pattern any more. For extra courses, you can just use a square paver.

One thing that is a little harder when installing a circle is screeding your sand.

zedosix
07-21-2007, 09:43 AM
Circles are pretty easy to install. We don't follow a pattern any more. For extra courses, you can just use a square paver.

One thing that is a little harder when installing a circle is screeding your sand.

Why would it be harder to screed for a circle then say a square?

lawnkid
07-23-2007, 03:43 PM
Your base is all around unsuitable and incorrect, your edging restraint is restraining the pavers, what about the bedding material buddy? Those are the mainfaults. Learn how to properly install pavers b4 you venture out is all I'm saying....

NEUSWEDE
07-25-2007, 12:08 AM
There are about 5 things I can count that are wrong with that job. Still waiting for Chris to jump in and explain why stone dust is not a suitable base. And it's not just the stone dust, #57's too.... You don't even have to take the ICPI class to know why stone dust is unsuitable. It's been discussed her only a dozen or so times..... :hammerhead:

What is wrong with stone dust? Why should I be using sand instead? Also ICPI is dumb I learned the real way hands on not by paying someone so they can give me a certificate and a Huge ICPI Sticker. I use stonedust in ever paver job I have done for the past 5 years and never a problem. Please tell us the secret.

Also show us some of your work please!

ChampionLS
07-25-2007, 01:13 AM
First of all... your wrong period. :nono:
Second of all... Your wrong to use stone dust, for reasons that outweigh any valid defense you can come up with. The I.C.P.I. is nothing more than a handful of industry leaders that have come up with specific installation guidelines when installing Concrete Pavingstones, and are the voice of the industry.

The material for the bedding layer should be coarse concrete sand only. Do not use stone dust or screenings; they do not allow the pavers to "seat" properly and do not allow for drainage. The sand should be an even 1” thick layer. Do not compact the sand setting bed. Do not mix Portland cement into the sand used for the setting bed or the joints between pavers. It defeats the flexibility of the system, and it cannot be cleaned off the surface of the pavers.

There are also aesthetic reasons for avoiding screenings. Anyone that's tried to use stone dust knows that it sticks to everything, including your shoes. You get the blue chips all over the surface of your pavers and in the joints. The irregular shaped pieces will not settle and be a visual eyesore.

Your circle kit will heave with the passing of a few winters and never settle flat. Eventually, it will be wavy and you'll listen and use concrete sand next time.

MowingisMaddness
07-29-2007, 03:48 PM
I find it a little harder to screed for a circle than a square, because with a square you can work from one side to the opposite side. With a circle you start in the center and screed out in all directions.

Grn Mtn
07-29-2007, 04:35 PM
circle kit tips.

- have a helper read the instructions and toss you the right paver, you stay put and just plop them down.

- get the diagram and enlarge it so its easier to read.

- use a 2x4 to help distribute your weight around (I kneel on it).

- when putting the pavers down your working in a circle, out one layer at a time, you'll find that sometimes laying them not so tight to the innermost circle then cheating them in is how you'll get the whole row to fit.

- I generally screed the whole circle first if its smaller but on larger ones I sometimes screed half.

- Most kits will tell you what the maximum size is with the kit, or how to make them larger. When you get around 12' just about any paver will make the circle.

- I would definately use polymeric sand but beware, circle kits eat up the 60# bags, instead of 60 sqft plan on 30. Sometimes people will put sand in the bottom half and top with polymeric.

dchauling
07-29-2007, 08:05 PM
I find it a little harder to screed for a circle than a square, because with a square you can work from one side to the opposite side. With a circle you start in the center and screed out in all directions.

What the heck are you talking about?? Screed a square and lay from the center using a strip of plywood until you can stay on the brick. Just don't put a 350 pounder on that plywood, get a small asian guy. JK

ChampionLS
07-29-2007, 10:00 PM
What the heck are you talking about?? Screed a square and lay from the center using a strip of plywood until you can stay on the brick. Just don't put a 350 pounder on that plywood, get a small asian guy. JK

Adios Mio! (LOL LOL) :dizzy:

He's got a point. With that screed method (the one I use too for circles) you put a stake in the center and use your screed to pivot around. This way you can create a positive pitch from the center. (like a cone shape).

Check it out : :cool2:

Notice you don't see any little "weggies" or gaps in my circles!

Dirty Water
07-29-2007, 10:12 PM
Needs lights around the perimeter and a spot in the middle going straight up vegas style.

dchauling
07-30-2007, 12:45 AM
Adios Mio! (LOL LOL) :dizzy:

He's got a point. With that screed method (the one I use too for circles) you put a stake in the center and use your screed to pivot around. This way you can create a positive pitch from the center. (like a cone shape).

Check it out : :cool2:

Notice you don't see any little "weggies" or gaps in my circles!

Thats great if you are in the middle of the yard. If you did that on your patio you are sloped towards the house for 25% of your circle.

I will try that method next time I do a circle where drainage allows.

ChampionLS
07-31-2007, 02:07 AM
Yea, thats ok. (you mean 50%). Even if, the rest of the patio should slope accordingly.

ChampionLS
07-31-2007, 02:08 AM
Haven't done a circle yet with lights.. Soon! I'll make sure they twinkle!