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P.L.
07-18-2007, 09:05 PM
I just built a small wall around some planting beds (12"tall) with a pavestone product from home depot. It was not my choice of products but the customer had their heart set on it, even though I gave them other options. The block only has a small lip on the back to keep it locked together. My question is, other than time and money would there be a major issue with gluing ever course to add strength to the wall? My thought is that it would no longer be a srw, but I was wondering what everyone else thought?

srl28
07-18-2007, 09:12 PM
I would think at that height, so long as you stagger (sp) the rows so that no lines/gaps match up and fasten the lips in there should be no trouble. It is only 1ft tall and from what you said it doens't sound like its holding much back.

P.L.
07-18-2007, 09:14 PM
I'm really not that worried about this wall, but when I was building it the thought crossed my mind. I figured I would ask for future work. Thanks for the feedback.

Captains Landscape
07-18-2007, 09:28 PM
I'm not a srw wall expert, but the way I look at it is the wall is only cosmetic. The srw units serve a single purpose in the whole construction of the "wall". The material that sits behind the face is what supports the retained soil. In theory, with a properly constructed wall, the face should be able to come off without the soil falling. I don't think PL will aid in sheer strength in the event the wall develops enough hydraulic pressure to make it fail. Long story short I don't think it will do anything to add strength, but someone like Mike might have a more seasoned answer for you....

Mike33
07-18-2007, 11:03 PM
I would think either way will be fine. 12" high nothing is going to happen. I read another post about a correct srw i agree with it. But at this size dont sweat it, i buit 4 flower boxes for my wifes apt. complex she manages breaking every rule i preach and they have been fine for 4 years.
Mike

ChampionLS
07-18-2007, 11:06 PM
Why waste your time? Thats only three courses at the most. If you need to re-locate the wall in the future, you can do it easily.

Drew Gemma
07-19-2007, 12:32 AM
you can never over build in the end explain both options with the client

P.L.
07-19-2007, 12:33 AM
What if the wall were three or four feet tall? Would gluing every course be a benifit or would it take away from the whole point of a swr? Not taking cost or time into consideration.

pls8xx
07-19-2007, 10:00 AM
Skip the glue,... well, unless you have some headstrong kids around.

It's unbelievable how fast two or three young boys can dismantle a SRW and rebuild the blocks as a fort. And that nice cabinet grade plywood you had makes a nice roof.

Did they get a whipping? Yes
Did they know they would get a whipping before they did it? Yes.
Did they do it anyway? Yep

There is nothing you can do with headstrong kids that have a high tolerance for pain. And I speak with the wisdom of first hand knowledge.

Glue might be a good idea.

Drew Gemma
07-19-2007, 02:49 PM
pl the max height on those blocks is pretty low I think at 4 feet you might be over see what manufacture specs are.

KeystoneLawn&Landscaping
07-19-2007, 09:20 PM
just 2cents from the rookie with the running bond in my first wall:hammerhead: ...I used adhesive in my project only because the job is along a highly traveled sidewalk near a middle school. I didn't want the students rearranging the wall.

Woodland
07-21-2007, 09:02 PM
Skip the glue,... well, unless you have some headstrong kids around.

It's unbelievable how fast two or three young boys can dismantle a SRW and rebuild the blocks as a fort. And that nice cabinet grade plywood you had makes a nice roof.

Did they get a whipping? Yes
Did they know they would get a whipping before they did it? Yes.
Did they do it anyway? Yep

There is nothing you can do with headstrong kids that have a high tolerance for pain. And I speak with the wisdom of first hand knowledge.

Glue might be a good idea.

:laugh: That cracks me up! I built a stone planter around a business sign in a downtown area last season and I used const. adhesive on the top layer of stones. People walking by asked why I was building the wall with adhesive instead of mortar so I had to explain that it was in fact a dry stacked wall/planter but the top layer was glued to prevent the stones from becoming weapons or ending up in the street!