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springover
07-24-2007, 06:37 PM
Can someone help me figure out how to change the oil on a 21 inch mower?

Frue
07-24-2007, 06:39 PM
turn it on its side and dump it out.

jsf343
07-24-2007, 06:57 PM
^^^^^^ He said it. Make sure your gas is turned off (if you have a switch) then carefully tip it on its side and poor into a drain pan. Have some old rags near buy in case of any spills.

Juan_Deere
07-24-2007, 07:05 PM
Or you can just use the drain plug under the deck. Unscrew drain plug, allow the oil to drain out, re-install drain plug. I usually set the mower up on a couple of blocks and it works perfectly space wise.

cgaengineer
07-24-2007, 07:39 PM
Or you can just use the drain plug under the deck. Unscrew drain plug, allow the oil to drain out, re-install drain plug. I usually set the mower up on a couple of blocks and it works perfectly space wise.

This will work unless its a B&S...I guess it cost too much to add drain plugs so you have to really turn the mower upside down!

Juan_Deere
07-24-2007, 07:49 PM
This will work unless its a B&S...I guess it cost too much to add drain plugs so you have to really turn the mower upside down!

I have 2 mowers and a pressure washer with B&S engines. All three have drain plugs. It just doesn't look like a drain plug because you can't use a socket to remove it. The male part of your extension or socket wrench, that you normally place in a socket, fits into the plug. In other words, it is just a four point receptacle, instead of eight or sixteen point, and it sits flush with the case body. Hard to see with grass or dirt build up.

cgaengineer
07-24-2007, 08:06 PM
I have 2 mowers and a pressure washer with B&S engines. All three have drain plugs. It just doesn't look like a drain plug because you can't use a socket to remove it. The male part of your extension or socket wrench, that you normally place in a socket, fits into the plug. In other words, it is just a four point receptacle, instead of eight or sixteen point, and it sits flush with the case body. Hard to see with grass or dirt build up.


I promise you will find no drain plug on my B&S that came on my Snapper HiVac...in fact the manual instructs you to turn the mower upside down. I am familiar with the square plug you reference (Same plug they have used for years)...but this cheap engine doesnt have it!

Juan_Deere
07-24-2007, 08:14 PM
I promise you will find no drain plug on my B&S that came on my Snapper HiVac...in fact the manual instructs you to turn the mower upside down. I am familiar with the square plug you reference (Same plug they have used for years)...but this cheap engine doesnt have it!

I doubt it doesn't have a drain plug. They just designed the deck so you can't get to it. So they just tell you to turn the mower upside down instead of removing the engine just to get to the drain plug.

cgaengineer
07-24-2007, 08:35 PM
Here is a shot of the underside of the mower/engine:

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e223/cgaengineer/BS.jpg

The two smaller bolts hold the case halves together and the larger bolts hold engine to the deck. I checked under the belt gaurd and no plug there either.

newz7151
07-24-2007, 08:44 PM
Also, it should be stated that most (in fact, likely all) Honda engines in the vertical config. do not have drainplugs and are supposed to be drained by tipping out the fill tube.

And yes, there are a few Briggs engines that do not have the plug on the bottom, or the mower equipment makes it so that it is more of a pain to get to the bottom plug. Which is why everyone should buy one of these http://www.yachtsee.com/pelaoilextractor.htm?OVRAW=pela&OVKEY=pela&OVMTC=standard

This place is the least expensive place (including shipping) I have found to get the Pela brand of these.

cgaengineer
07-24-2007, 08:57 PM
Briggs and Stratton knows that on the Quantum engine you will only have to change it twice before its worn out anyway so they omit the drain plug. I have rebuilt many small engines and I have yet to see one without a drain plug until this mower. I recently went to my dealer to order some rings and piston for a horizontal shaft 5HP Briggs and was told that rings cannot be purchased anymore and I had to go with after market rings. Briggs and Strattons are not what they used to be.

cgaengineer
07-24-2007, 08:58 PM
Also, it should be stated that most (in fact, likely all) Honda engines in the vertical config. do not have drainplugs and are supposed to be drained by tipping out the fill tube.

And yes, there are a few Briggs engines that do not have the plug on the bottom, or the mower equipment makes it so that it is more of a pain to get to the bottom plug. Which is why everyone should buy one of these http://www.yachtsee.com/pelaoilextractor.htm?OVRAW=pela&OVKEY=pela&OVMTC=standard

This place is the least expensive place (including shipping) I have found to get the Pela brand of these.

Pretty neat idea!

mztrish
07-24-2007, 09:25 PM
i can't take it anymore!!!!!! i'm registered now..... watch out.
are ya'll kidding me?! you can't change your oil in your 21" mower?!!!!
on most all engines there is a drain plug underneath. SOMETIMES it may be concealed by a belt guard. but go ahead and call your local dealler so you can sound like an uneducated cutter. NOW, in order to investigate if there is a drain plug OR if you in deed do have to dump the oil, be sure the spark plug is ALWAYS in the air or you will then get oil in your air filter/carburetor or get oil in the muffler which in New Orleans we don't mind b/c the smoke runs off the mosquitos.

Vikings
07-24-2007, 10:10 PM
Mine don't have drain plugs.. my 21's I mean.

You gotta flip them on their side just make sure the air filter is always up.

Juan_Deere
07-24-2007, 10:13 PM
Here is a shot of the underside of the mower/engine:

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e223/cgaengineer/BS.jpg

The two smaller bolts hold the case halves together and the larger bolts hold engine to the deck. I checked under the belt gaurd and no plug there either.

That's a nice picture. But it doesn't prove your point. I already stated that some manufacturers design their decks with no consideration with getting to the plug. Yours COULD be one of those. So it could still have a plug which is hidden by the deck. It doesn't matter how many pictures you take with the engine on the deck. Or it could have a plug on the side somewhere.

With that being said. I now know some engines don't have drain plugs, but it has nothing to do with them being B&S.

Juan_Deere
07-24-2007, 10:21 PM
i can't take it anymore!!!!!! i'm registered now..... watch out.
are ya'll kidding me?! you can't change your oil in your 21" mower?!!!!
on most all engines there is a drain plug underneath. SOMETIMES it may be concealed by a belt guard. but go ahead and call your local dealler so you can sound like an uneducated cutter. NOW, in order to investigate if there is a drain plug OR if you in deed do have to dump the oil, be sure the spark plug is ALWAYS in the air or you will then get oil in your air filter/carburetor or get oil in the muffler which in New Orleans we don't mind b/c the smoke runs off the mosquitos.


The other day I was tilting a mower with the spark plug in the air to get to the blade adapter. Oil immediately drenched the air filter. So at least some of your advice is flawed.

DOLMARatOS
07-24-2007, 11:36 PM
YES I say YES. There are a growing number of engines being used in power equipment that do not have oil drains or no practical access. Auto manufacturers are also starting in with this trend. If you are in the mowing business doing your own maintenance then get yourself and oil evacuation system for these types of engines.

The systems are not THAT expensive and they also offer a safe means of storage and smart disposal of waste oil legally.

The method we offer to the consumer that wants to change their own oil is to run the unituntil it is out of fuel (like at the end of the mowing) then tip it over and drain the oil through the dipstick tube. This makes sure that fuel does not spill and that the oil is very warm.

Some will undoubtably complain that they couldn't get evey last drop of oil out of the unit. This is true in ALL oil changes, no matter what you do there will be an amount of oil left over in the motor. But, if oil changes are done regularly at recomended intervals for your amount of use and you use quality oil; then you will have a motor that will last as long as mechanically possible providing you keep the filter clean also.

fixer67
07-24-2007, 11:53 PM
YES I say YES. There are a growing number of engines being used in power equipment that do not have oil drains or no practical access. Auto manufacturers are also starting in with this trend. If you are in the mowing business doing your own maintenance then get yourself and oil evacuation system for these types of engines.

The systems are not THAT expensive and they also offer a safe means of storage and smart disposal of waste oil legally.

The method we offer to the consumer that wants to change their own oil is to run the unituntil it is out of fuel (like at the end of the mowing) then tip it over and drain the oil through the dipstick tube. This makes sure that fuel does not spill and that the oil is very warm.

Some will undoubtably complain that they couldn't get evey last drop of oil out of the unit. This is true in ALL oil changes, no matter what you do there will be an amount of oil left over in the motor. But, if oil changes are done regularly at recomended intervals for your amount of use and you use quality oil; then you will have a motor that will last as long as mechanically possible providing you keep the filter clean also.

You mean to tell me that car makers are starting to make cars without oil drain plugs?:dizzy:

fixer67
07-24-2007, 11:57 PM
The other day I was tilting a mower with the spark plug in the air to get to the blade adapter. Oil immediately drenched the air filter. So at least some of your advice is flawed.

You must tilt it in a manner where the spark plug and carb/air filter are at the highest point. The oil you are talking about came back though the crankcase vent which vents into the air filter assembly. See it all the time from people hauling push mowers in the trunk of there car and putting it in wrong.

DOLMARatOS
07-25-2007, 12:01 AM
You mean to tell me that car makers are starting to make cars without oil drain plugs?:dizzy:

Yes they do. Foreign manufacturers are actually building engines with integrated drain "tubes" that run to the lowest point of the oiling system and are connected to a port on the outside of the motor. They use a vacum system to remove the oil and also have a large needle to suck the oil out of the filter before removing it. This is MUCH faster and safer than pulling drain plus. Less contact with used oil and less chance of a spill are always better. Used waste oil is known to increase chances of cancer and birth defects.

Plus, the idiot at lube-pros can't strip your drain plug.

newz7151
07-25-2007, 12:54 AM
Plus, the idiot at lube-pros can't strip your drain plug.

OR, forget to put it back in tight and dont' notice that the oil they put in has drained right through until you drive off.

Bill M
07-26-2007, 02:23 AM
My new Snapper Hi-Vac has a drain plug under the belt guard, it has the BS 7hp intek.

cgaengineer
07-26-2007, 07:46 AM
My new Snapper Hi-Vac has a drain plug under the belt guard, it has the BS 7hp intek.


Thats great news Bill...hopefully people complained and Snapper listened. I think the Intek is a better engine then the Quantum anyway (Cast Iron Bore) so its designed to be easy to maintain for long life.

Juan_Deere
07-26-2007, 05:37 PM
You must tilt it in a manner where the spark plug and carb/air filter are at the highest point. The oil you are talking about came back though the crankcase vent which vents into the air filter assembly. See it all the time from people hauling push mowers in the trunk of there car and putting it in wrong.

Can you demonstrate how to do this, when the spark plug is in the front middle, and the air filter is on the rear left?

lawnboy dan
07-26-2007, 06:24 PM
my experience with the intec has not been good -mine has a defective camshaft after only a few dozen hrs. give me a quantum i/c anyday

DOLMARatOS
07-26-2007, 06:37 PM
my experience with the intec has not been good -mine has a defective camshaft after only a few dozen hrs. give me a quantum i/c anyday

Please clarify "defective camshaft" was the unit still under warranty?

The Intek engine does require periodic valve adjustment depending upon usage. Also, all Briggs engines without oil filters have a 25 hour oil change interval for severe service. Initial break-in oil change should be at 5 hours.

We haven't seen any camshaft problems due to manufacturer defect on the Intek engines at this point. I'd be curious to know how many hours / seasons were on the engine, what the oil change interval was and if it was under warranty. This is why a good dealer is important with power equipment.

DOLMARatOS
07-26-2007, 06:40 PM
I also like the Quantum I/C engines with the cast-iron cylinder. Have seen a ton of hours with good maintenance. The Intek engines put our more HP, use less fuel and should have an even longer life-span but time will tell.

I'm getting great feedback from the new DOV briggs engines. Easy to start and less moving parts inside. Time will tell on this one.

Restrorob
07-26-2007, 07:13 PM
Please clarify "defective camshaft" was the unit still under warranty?

Briggs did in fact have some Intek camshafts that were not properly heat treated thus the lobes wore flat enough to stop the engine. This would happen anywhere from 3 hrs. run time on up depending on the faulty treating.

The first one I ran across they sent me a new cam and sump gasket, The other three they sent short-blocks.
They were all covered under warranty.

These were the 7.5 and 8hp on Gen-Sets.


BTW....I just couldn't stand it any longer, I just HAD to find out why so many post for changing the oil in a push mower......