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View Full Version : How do I apply this fertilizer?


lawnjet52
07-31-2007, 07:49 PM
I have two 50 lb bags of Urea 46%N. I was just wondering when the best time and how to apply this to the lawn.

I've never used it before, but I heard it can really help a lawn come back to life.

Keegan
07-31-2007, 09:17 PM
post it in the pesticide forum. you'll probably get a better response since this is the organic one

lawnjet52
07-31-2007, 09:21 PM
I asked them over there. I would erase this thread but dont see how.

mdlwn1
07-31-2007, 11:01 PM
46%? in this weather...your looking at an acre's worth...

mrkosar
08-01-2007, 11:34 AM
wait until late fall.

Kiril
08-19-2007, 09:35 AM
wait until late fall.

Your kidding right?

mrkosar
08-19-2007, 10:13 AM
Your kidding right?

no actually i'm not. BUT, i didn't realize he was working with warm season grass so it is probably different down there.

universities recommend putting down high soluble nitrogen in late fall for root growth and as a winterizer. many golf courses and lawn care companies do it.

are you kidding me? what the hell buddy.

Kiril
08-19-2007, 11:18 AM
no actually i'm not. BUT, i didn't realize he was working with warm season grass so it is probably different down there.

universities recommend putting down high soluble nitrogen in late fall for root growth and as a winterizer. many golf courses and lawn care companies do it.

are you kidding me? what the hell buddy.

I didn't see any mention of what type of turf he is dealing with. Without knowing the type of turf, how can you say late fall? I also didn't see you mention what rate it should be applied at?

Application of N where it is not deficient will generally not lead to increased root growth. Furthermore, if you over apply N, your most likely going to get a reduction of root growth, not to mention potential disease related problems.

Some turf benefits more from a late summer/early fall application other late fall/early winter. Late fall/early winter applications are primarily used to provide resources for early spring growth.

So I ask you, not knowing the type of turf, soil, or site management strategies, what rate should he apply a fertilizer with a 46-0-0 analysis?

lawnjet52
08-19-2007, 07:42 PM
I went ahead and put this Urea down a few weeks ago with the help of my buddy from the golf course. I used a little less than 50 pounds.

My yard is out of control..... I can't keep up with the growth, my lawnmower blades are dull, the weed eater can't handle the thick grass. I have grass growing in places that shouldn't have grass. I used to cut grass every two weeks, now I do it twice a week.

but I'm not complaining. Almost all of the bald spots are gone, I've never seen grass get this green and thick. Very heathly looking.

My Neighbours are giving me dirty looks. The color difference at the property line is similiar to the greens on this forum.

*I have Centipede grass-6 years old.
*The sprinklers are set for every other day at 3:30am. 4 zones, 30 mins each, city water.

My next question will be when to weed & feed.

Kiril
08-19-2007, 11:26 PM
Sounds to me like you over applied. How many square feet did you apply ~50 lbs to?

dcgreenspro
08-20-2007, 12:20 AM
nothing like dumping the n out there and then pounding it w/ water when it's not needed. You are worrying about root growth but aren't giving them a chance w/ a constant schedule. Future apps w/ tht high amount of water sol are going to burn you sooner or later.

lawnjet52
08-20-2007, 10:12 AM
nothing like dumping the n out there and then pounding it w/ water when it's not needed. You are worrying about root growth but aren't giving them a chance w/ a constant schedule. Future apps w/ tht high amount of water sol are going to burn you sooner or later.

Do you realize where I live? Most people around here water every day. The past two weeks the temp has been hovering around 100 degrees with hardly any rain. The guys that don't water have brown grass.

Trust me, I would use less water if I could get away with it. 32,000 Gallons makes for a nasty water bill.

What do you suggest with watering?

I tried to cut back on the water in June (before applying N) with no luck, started getting brown patches within the first 4 days.

Conway SC is nothing like PA.

Kiril
08-20-2007, 12:18 PM
In my area, watering fescue once every 3 days at those temps and no rain ever in the summer. This should also be sufficient for centipede during drought conditions providing you water deep enough.

Over fertilizing, specifically N and P, will lead to problems, and high N applications during a drought (or at any time) is ill-advised.

Here's a link to extension doc put out by NC State. Not SC, but probably close enough.

http://www.turffiles.ncsu.edu/pubs/management/ag-381.pdf

Based on that docs suggested rates, you should have been applying ~ 1 lb of 46-0-0 per 1000 square feet. Do you think you over-fertilized?

NattyLawn
08-20-2007, 02:11 PM
No offense to the poster, but he's a homeowner asking about how to apply 46-0-0 urea in the organic forum. He has no idea how much N he's applying and just wants to juice up the lawn.

nmurph
08-20-2007, 03:48 PM
i don't know how much yard you are covering, but you have just dumped enough N for 1 acre for 1 year.


from UGA ------Centipede

Maintenance
Fertilization -- A fertilization program should be based on soil test analyses. As mentioned, centipede has a natural light green color and is suited to acid soils (pH 5.0 to 6.0) but grows best at a higher pH. High rates of fertilizer, especially nitrogen, will produce a dark green color but will also lead to growth problems. One to two pounds of nitrogen per 1000 square feet per year is generally good for centipede, although it will grow well without any fertilizer. The 2-pound rate may be preferable on sandy soils. Apply nitrogen in split applications. Apply the first two to three weeks after spring green-up and the second in midsummer (July - August). Determine phosphorus and potassium needs by soil testing. If soil testing is not used, a general purpose fertilizer with a 3-1-2 nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium (N-P2-O5-K2O) ratio such as 12-4-8 is good. Apply 5 pounds of 12-4-8 per 1000 square feet after spring green-up and again in midsummer. Another possible choice of fertilizer is 4 pounds of 16-4-8 per 1000 square feet after spring green-up and in midsummer. Apply the fertilizer evenly over the area when the grass leaves are dry. Use a mechanical spreader and use the two-direction application procedures as described for seeding. (Figure 1) Remember, avoid excessive fertilization and avoid early spring applications.

Mowing -- Proper mowing is also very important to maintaining healthy, attractive turf. Mow at 1 to 1-1/2 inches. Use a rotary mower with sharp blades, and mow often enough so only 1/3 of the plant height is removed. High and infrequent mowing tends to encourage thatch development, which can lead to chlorosis, drought stress and winter injury. However, during periods of moisture stress or in shaded areas, the mowing height should be raised about 1/2 inch.

Irrigation -- Irrigate during periods of moisture stress to keep centipede healthy. Water only when the grass shows signs of moisture stress, such as rolling leaves, gray color or wilting. Apply enough water to thoroughly wet the soil to a depth of 6 to 8 inches. Early morning is the best time to water, since evening watering can encourage disease development.

Irrigation during the fall and spring can be very helpful to centipedegrass. Although the grass is not totally green, it is still growing at this time. Therefore, it should receive some water either from rainfall or irrigation every two weeks. This may be particularly important in the spring as new shoot and root growth begin.

here is the link to the UGA turf science school. PLEASE, for your yard's sake, read it. it is very simple to understand.

http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/L313-w.html

NattyLawn
08-20-2007, 08:25 PM
Great post ^^^^^

Armadillolawncare
08-21-2007, 03:46 AM
This post isn't for real is it? Its cracking me up!! His description of his lawn after applying the fert just kills me.

mrkosar
08-21-2007, 10:58 PM
I didn't see any mention of what type of turf he is dealing with. Without knowing the type of turf, how can you say late fall? I also didn't see you mention what rate it should be applied at?

Application of N where it is not deficient will generally not lead to increased root growth. Furthermore, if you over apply N, your most likely going to get a reduction of root growth, not to mention potential disease related problems.

Some turf benefits more from a late summer/early fall application other late fall/early winter. Late fall/early winter applications are primarily used to provide resources for early spring growth.

So I ask you, not knowing the type of turf, soil, or site management strategies, what rate should he apply a fertilizer with a 46-0-0 analysis?

i gave him a short quick answer, and then realized he lived in SC so he probably has warm season grass. i stated this in a previous post admitting my error. here is a little information from a bulletin from OSU:

Fertilizer Programs
University research has shown that fall (August or September) and late fall (October, November or December) fertilization is ideal for home lawns. Fertilization during these times will benefit lawns more than any other practice. Most homeowners place too much emphasis on spring and summer fertilization. Some fertilizer is needed during the spring and summer, however, over-application of fertilizer at these times can cause disease and other problems and result in "summer lawn nightmares."

Advantages of Fall/Late Fall Fertilization
Disease and weed problems are usually less severe when fall and late fall fertilization are practiced. Heat and drought tolerance are usually better, thus enhancing summer lawn quality. "Finally, the grass plant produces more root mass and a deeper root system, resulting in an overall healthier plant".

Obviously if you put down too much it will cause more problems than benefits. That is the case with any program on any type of turf.

I would say apply 1 to 1.5 lbs. of N per 1,000 square feet if he were in ohio with a blue/rye lawn. Instead he is in SC with centipede grass, so tell us what he should do lawn professor? and i'm still not kidding you.

Kiril
08-21-2007, 11:26 PM
I would say apply 1 to 1.5 lbs. of N per 1,000 square feet if he were in ohio with a blue/rye lawn. Instead he is in SC with centipede grass, so tell us what he should do lawn professor? and i'm still not kidding you.

http://www.lawnsite.com/showpost.php?p=1935973&postcount=13