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dozerman21
08-05-2007, 12:12 AM
I'm going to try to get a pole barn up before fall, and I have some questions about building the pad. I've leveled for barn pads before, but I have only built up for one in the past. The homeowner finished the pad, I just brought in the dirt and graded it.

I'm going to build something around a 50'X100' barn. The area where the barn is going is not low, I just want the barn to sit up some. I'd like to take the dirt that's coming out of the driveway cut and use to build the pad. I'd like to bring it up about a foot, plus however many inches I need to add with stone. I plan to have a concrete floor poured right after the barn is built.
Here are my questions:

-What kind of compactor do I need to use after I build up with dirt?

-I have a plate compactor that I can use. Would this work, or do I need a vibratory roller?

-How many inches of agg. do I need on top of the dirt?

-What kind of agg? I was thinking crushed #53's, about 6" thick (the concrete floor will go right on top of this).

-What kind of compactor for the agg?

-If I need a vibratory roller, would the Skid/CTL attachment vib. roller work?




Concrete Question:

I plan on pouring the floor 6" thick with fiber.

-Do I need steel mesh?


Any info on these would be great. Sorry for all the Q's, I just want to make sure I do it right. I may have more barn related questions to come...

Fieldman12
08-05-2007, 12:51 AM
Post some pics when you get to doing this job if you don't care. I cut a barn pad and loved it. I would probably go with a roller you drive or at least a roller for a skid steer but I guess I could be wrong. How muchare you going to charge just to build it up and level it if you dont mind me asking. I made this one 40x60 and add 3' around the building. I was just curious because I wondered how much someone would have charged for the one I cut. One end I had to cut down and the other end build up.

ksss
08-05-2007, 01:43 AM
Everyone around the country does things a little different depending on material available. I will outline the way I would do it here in Idaho.

I am in total agreement with elevating the barn. My personal shop I built 18" off of the exisiting flat ground. I would use pit run to build the majority of your pad (up to the last 4" of subgrade). You want to use "structural fill". Avoid using material from the road to build your pad (unless it happens to be pit run). Usually it is topsoil which is high in organic materials (not what you want to build on unless it is your garden). I prefer to use an 8" minus pitrun. My roller weighs about 8K so I do 1 foot lifts. Be sure you can water the pitrun to maximize compaction if it needs it. The last four inches of your subgrade would be 3/4 roadbase. The same material used under asphalt. I would hold off on the roadbase until your pole barn is up. The drilling of the holes just contaminates the subgrade and all the driving around screws up the grade. After the shell is up I would go in and spread and compact the roadbase. Set up string lines or whatever you need to assure yourself you are to grade. A .5 inch deviation on that much concrete will get expensive. A 6 inch floor with fiber is a lot of floor. You may consider a 4" floor with fiber and increasing the concrete mix to achieve a 4K psi. typically it is 2500 to 3000. It may be cheaper and yield a better floor. I would talk with your local concrete provider and pick his brain about options. You do not need wire mesh if you using fiber unless you plan to heat the floor with PEX tubing.

Equipment: I have never used a skid steer vib. roller. I would rent a twin drum vibratory or something similiar. The plate will be of zero value except getting the corners you cant reach with the roller and then only in the roadbase. Proper moisure is key to good compaction. Be sure to rent a big enough roller. The single drum rollers work well for the pit run and the twin drums work better on the roadbase material. Since you will be renting that is the way I would go. I use a twin drum for everything since thats what I own.

Hint on barn: Be sure when the barn is built/concrete poured that the bottom edge of the steel extends below the floor grade on the exterior walls. If that does not make sense let me know. In other words the top of floor grade needs to be higher than the bottom the steel walls. This will prevent or help prevent water from coming in.

If you are running any water inside the barn be sure to compact the trenches. That should all be done before adding pit run. I cannot over state the importance of compacting the trenches. This includes drains or french drains.

Again that is the way your project would be completed here.

Scag48
08-05-2007, 04:41 AM
KSSS nailed it, that's basically what we would do here. No more than 4" of road base is needed, just compact the pit run really well and moisture content is key. I've used a larger, reversible plate compactor and have achieved 98% in 6-8" lifts, unless someone can really tell me the difference between that and a twin drum roller I'd say you could go with either. I wouldn't, however, use a smaller 5HP 19" plate, they just don't have enough thump.

Fieldman12
08-05-2007, 08:00 AM
I agree with what both said but did not want to talk much since I don't have the experience others have in this other than the cutting and filling. What they said is seriously how I would look at doing it. I did not worry about the rock since I knew it was going to be gravel but if it was going to be concrete inside I would have done exactly as they mentioned. Im glad to know I was not too far off.

RockSet N' Grade
08-05-2007, 08:51 AM
I've poured alot of floors and parking lots for industrial buildings and rarely would we ever pour a 6" slab inside the building or the parking/loading dock areas. If your base underneath is solid, you can run a semi on 5" concrete all day long and not lose the integrity of the slab. We threw out wire mesh in the early 80's and went with #3 rebar 18" o.c. instead. Price was about the same and the rebar ended up in the slab instead of on the dirt below the concrete (which always seems to happen with wire mesh). Since you are using fibre, you may not really need to use steel to get your desired strength. I always bullnose the edges, at least the traffic areas, to insure no breaks there. We would saw cut our slabs after they greened up, and that always looks cleaner to me than trowled in control joints. Depending on your use of the barn, I like to spray a sealer when the mud has cured.......it does not stop stains completely, but sure helps for the life of the slab.

dozerman21
08-05-2007, 09:21 AM
Thanks for the replies, guys.

Fieldman12- This is going to be my personal barn. I'd like a 60'X100', but I think a 50'X100' should do the job, and It's a lot cheaper. I'll post some pics as I go along. I'm hoping to start working on it in the next week, but it probably will take a good six weeks before the shell gets up and concrete gets poured. I've got to squeeze everything in around everybody's schedule's that's helping me.

KSSS- Nice detailed info. I think I'll stick with the 6" concrete floor with fiber. I'm building this barn to be able to pull my rig in every night. I usually am hauling between 27,000 and 31,000 lbs., plus the weight of the truck and trailer, so I'd rather be safe than sorry. I've got some friends that do concrete work, and I'm getting a pretty sweet deal. They even suggested that the mesh would be smart, but I don't think I need it. They're going to use 4,000 psi, so I think that, along with the 6" depth with fiber, and a nice compacted base should hold up well for a long time.

I was thinking the same thing about waiting to use the road base until the holes are drilled.

I'd like to have a utiltity sink and line for a hose somewhere inside the building. At what point should I have the plumbing done?

AWJ Services
08-05-2007, 10:49 AM
I think I'll stick with the 6" concrete floor with fiber.

Fiber generally only adds about 100 psi strength rating.
It is much cheaper too step up too the next psi level instead and stronger.

Ask your local concrete company on their opinion.

Fieldman12
08-05-2007, 11:18 AM
Sounds like a nice barn. They are suppose to build our barn the week after next.

RockSet N' Grade
08-05-2007, 11:23 AM
Rough in your pad and compact. Have your batterboards set up so you know your barn wall lines. Layout your posts, interior offices, any interior walls with batterboards and a string line. Now dig your plumbing, underground electrical ( make sure to add extra conduit for future lines that we always end up needing). Check your measurements to make sure your finished fixtures are where you want them and backfill and compact. When you backfill, be there and make sure no rocks are backfilled on top of any of your underground piping.

RockSet N' Grade
08-05-2007, 11:27 AM
Six inch slab is a dandy slab. Since you are going that far consider #3 rebar in the slab at least in the heavy equipment areas. Whatever you do, don't do the wire mesh........its a pain to pull up as they pour to get into the middle of the concrete and never happens in reality. I've demo'd alot of warehouse floors that tried the mesh and its always, and I mean always, on the dirt or barely in the mud in rare occasions. Since this is for heavy equipment, bullnosing on the front roll up door areas is a must.

RockSet N' Grade
08-05-2007, 11:33 AM
When we set our batterboards for the pads, we always off set them equally and it is usually 6 or 8 feet to give wiggle room for machines and workers. We spray paint all batter boards with high visability orange paint and usually tie ribbon or a flag on each batterboard setup. Sometimes, depending on the equipment being used, we pound in a t-post near the batterboards and paint/flag it too for better visability. It seems everytime you paint something, for whatever reason, it becomes a magnet and target to get run over.......a painted t-post discourages that occurance.

dozerman21
08-05-2007, 01:22 PM
Fiber generally only adds about 100 psi strength rating.
It is much cheaper too step up too the next psi level instead and stronger.

Ask your local concrete company on their opinion.

I'm pretty sure adding fiber is more for helping to minimize cracks, and have a more uniform reinforcement thoughout the pour. I think it also helps the mix flex better. It should add some compressed psi strength, but it probably is minimal. 4.000 psi is pretty stong. That should be all I need. I'm no concrete guru though by any means!

RSG- Thanks for the info. You're right about the mesh. Even concrete guys will tell you that they rarely float the mesh in the middle. It usually lays on the base. I thought of using the rebar in the approach areas where the concrete will be sloped. I will also see if there is much of a price difference on a true 5" slab. I don't want to go any less than that.


Does anyone know how tall a front load concrete truck is? I'll measure one the next time I see one, I'm just curious. I was considering 12' doors, but I think I'm going to go with 14' doors with 16 1/2' sidewalls. You never know what you might have down the road.

ksss
08-05-2007, 01:50 PM
I have pulled out fiber reinforced concrete and it sucks from that standpoint. You are forced to pulverize it. It certainly makes it stronger, perhaps not from a compression aspect but certainly from a flex aspect. Dozerman you might get your poles up then prep for and pour your concrete. It allows the guys putting the building up to use electric highlifts on the inside. Much neater and easier from that aspect. It would also allow you to dump your base material inside the building rather than shuffling it in with your loader. The concrete guys can bring a truck in from anywhere.

Several other things while I am thinking about it. I insulated mine then sheeted the inside with 7/16 waferboard. What I like about wafer is you nail anything on the wall anywhere, and it does not get dirty (atleast no one can tell) and adds rigidity to the building. I don't know what wafer is selling for but its a thought. I also used exposed conduit to wire the inside. Makes it much easier to add on other outlets or whatever later. My suggestion would be don't put one piece of equipment in the building until you are completely done. Once you start filling it before it is done, you will anger the shop god and you will never completely finish the shop.

dozerman21
08-05-2007, 02:38 PM
KSSS- My goal is to get the building up and start working on the inside before it gets cold here. I should have about 3 months before the temp drops below freezing. I'll need all of that time. The first thing I have to do is cut my drive back to the barn and bring in stone. The drive is 500+ feet long, and then I have to make a turn around area by the barn. I'm either going to build this barn soon, or in the spring. I still need to add all the costs together to see how much I'm looking at, but I've got an idea.

I'd like to build it soon so I can work on the inside this winter when work is slowed down by the weather. I'd like to have the barn insulated before it gets cold if I build this year. I was planning on using 7/16 OSB (same as wafer board, right?) to sheet the insulation. Hopefully if all goes well, I can hang the OSB, run the conduit, and add some kind of heat this winter. I'd like to get a wood burning stove in there sometime. I have my equipment in there, but I won't put in the pool table, er... I mean office, until the rest is finished.:) I'll have some buddies coming over to help do some of the inside work, so I'll have to have a full fridge!:drinkup:

I've got a descent grasp on the right way to get this going, but I'm a little unsure about the drains.

How many drains should I have in the floor?

Do I need to use pipe and run it to a certain area?

Also, I haven't checked into permits yet. My land is zoned agricultural, and I know I can build whatever size I want, and run a business out of it. I'm just wondering what kind of inspections I may have, if any? I know all areas are different.

ksss
08-05-2007, 03:02 PM
QPS built his shop in your area I think, he can fill you in on the zoning issues I am sure.

Is the interior of the shop going to be clear span from one end to the other?

One option is a partition in the middle with a walk out and equipment size door (or at whatever point you believe to be appropriate). This would allow you to heat and insulate a portion of the shop and keep the other side cold or at least less heated than the portion you would work and maintain equipment in. This lowers your heating costs. It would also allow you to complete the interior in sections and spread the cost over time. I would personally would not consider a woodburning stove. It will never heat a shop that size to any comfortable level, especially with a tall ceiling height. They are also a PINTA and a hazard. I put infloor heat in mine. I like it but it sucks when I want to thaw a piece of equipment immediately. Drastic changes in temp are slow in coming. You don't get as cold as we do so maybe your heat requirements are not as important to you as they would be to me.

The drains can be done a number of ways. I would need to know if the inside is open all the way down.

RockSet N' Grade
08-05-2007, 03:23 PM
Radiant floor heat is the cats meow. Another possibility to consider is a waste oil burner for the shop area. They make a pretty nice and efficient unit and I personally would prefer that over a wood burning stove seeing as how (if you ever change your oil) you could use that as a supplement for the shop area. There are some dirt guys here that have them and love them......I helped build a modified "Mother Earth Magazine" version in a shop in the Arizona/New Mexico area on a ranch two years ago and my buddy relies on it solely for his shop heat during winter........no problems to date with it.

qps
08-05-2007, 05:13 PM
I would check on the zoning....I had to buy a piece of ag. zoned property and have it rezoned to have my landscaping business...trust me...check into it before you start..if your in Marion county especially, if you have any question feel free to ask...it took me almost a year from start to finish to get my zoning...big hassle, but the city can make your life a living hell if not...

qps
08-05-2007, 05:17 PM
we used trench drains in 20 ft runs...they work good but need to be cleaned from time to time. radiant gas heat is how I'm heating this winter, I bought three 80K btu tube heaters to install once the ceiling is in, lined the walls with steel...use the bottom board on your door to pour your floor height, that way you walk into a level floor...we use 5" fibermesh and drive skidsteer and small excavator on it all the time....

dozerman21
08-05-2007, 05:31 PM
KSSS- The interior will be a clear span from one end to the other. I might partition off a corner down the road, but the middle will always be open. My rig is around 55' long, and I want to be able to pull in one end, and drive out the other. I will have one overhead door on each end, plus an overhead door on one broad side, along with a service door.

I don't know much about radiant floor heating. How much is it to install, and what does it cost to use (app.)?

We have a smaller size wood burning stove in my Dad's shop that works very well. This building is only about half the size of the one I want to build, but it heats is good. The good thing about it is it's cheap to use. The bad thing is it takes a while to heat up, and then you have to put the fire out if you leave. We have it well ventilated and we're always there when a fire is going. It's also harder to control the temperature. We also use a gas furnace blower to keep the temp above 50 degrees at night. They work well together. The gas furnace will eat your wallet quick! If I did go with a wood burner, I'd have propane to go with it. There's no gas out there yet.

RSG- I'm also considering a used oil burner. I don't go through oil like some guys, but I've got friends who are mechanics that could round some up from time to time. That might be a good possibility. I've looked into them before. I think is was Lansoil? (sp?) They had one for around $3,500 that fit my square footage. I don't think the installation would be too bad. The only negative I've heard is that they can be a PIA to clean and repair.

dozerman21
08-05-2007, 05:41 PM
I would check on the zoning....I had to buy a piece of ag. zoned property and have it rezoned to have my landscaping business...trust me...check into it before you start..if your in Marion county especially, if you have any question feel free to ask...it took me almost a year from start to finish to get my zoning...big hassle, but the city can make your life a living hell if not...

QPS- I'm in Marion county now, but my property is in Johnson county. Like you said, it's almost impossible to build or run a business out of Marion county, unless you're grandfathered in. I'm zoned agricultural, and I checked before I bought the land to make sure I can have a barn before I build a house. They said I can pretty much do whatever I need to. I will check again to make sure before anything gets started.

Thanks for the advice... I know I'll have more Q's to come.

qps
08-05-2007, 05:46 PM
Yeah...check into...my buddy own's a concrete business in shelby county and got into a zoning issue, and he's on 17 acres....if your barn is to run an ag. business you can build any size you want...but when you drive or take equipment off site...that's where the gray area starts...if no one around you cares or turns you in..your good to go...make someone mad or let the code enforement guy catch you and look out.....:cry: I'm sending you a pm...

TonyG
08-05-2007, 06:45 PM
dozerman, I'm looking at doing the same project. I was wondering how you plan to set the 6 X 6 main support post? I've heard of a few ways to accomplish this...simply cement them in the bore hole, with or without Sono-tube. Set them atop J-bolts and fab your own base plate. What is the prefered method to use here?

Fieldman12
08-05-2007, 08:14 PM
Personally since you are building such a big barn I would have at the least a 14' tall door at the entrance after all is said and done meaning concrete poured. It will cost you more money no doubt but as big as you are building and all and to allow for future big equipment why not? Also something to conside I know you want a roll up door but if I was you I would have a 20' entrance door. They are great for big equipment and also you have plenty of room to get another piece of equipment around something. Not sure if you guys farm also and have a combine but if you do you will be glad you put it in.

Fieldman12
08-05-2007, 08:19 PM
I know your on a budget like me and everyone else but the thicker you can build the floor and reinforce it the better off you are. Not sure if you farm any (sounds like you may not) but yoou can usually get away with allot more especially when comes to business. Allot of trucking and Construction business's especially around here are located on a farm. Personally for tax reasons I would keep it under farm. Save you a boat load of tax down the road not to metion the first year.

Fieldman12
08-05-2007, 08:29 PM
I have a buddie building a barn to store his excavating equipment and live in. I thing he said 60'x150'. It will look just like a house in the living quarters part wihen done. Another buddie has a farm and trucking business. He also built the barn with living quarters that is very fancy inside. I think he dont it like 1o years ago. I think he said the living quarters alone cost him $70,000.00. It has deck on one side with a hot tub and pool. Been a ton of parties there.:)

Fieldman12
08-05-2007, 08:31 PM
I think all you would have to do to get around the law is have it farmed. Around here it must be at least 10 acres or produce if memory serves me correct at least $2,500. in income if less than 10 acres.

qps
08-05-2007, 08:45 PM
I think all you would have to do to get around the law is have it farmed. Around here it must be at least 10 acres or produce if memory serves me correct at least $2,500. in income if less than 10 acres.

Get around the law....why not just do it right?????

RockSet N' Grade
08-05-2007, 08:50 PM
DozerMan.......Fieldman is knocking on a good door of "creative thinking". I too live on agricultural land and I built a barn.........but never, never, never would (when getting permits) call it a "business entity". It was built as a "hay barn" or equipment storage for my farming equipment. The consequences of not doing it that way were significant! Get a code book from your city/county and talk around alot before you pull permits.

Fieldman12
08-05-2007, 09:06 PM
Because it is going to cost you a ton of money with no advantage to it at all. Why throw money away especially if he can use it for farm purposes. My uncle has some farm land that just so happens to be in a business zone. He did not know until he started building. Because of this and even though it was going to be to store his 14 tractors in it cost him a bunch of extra money. They made him use a bunch of extra concrete and all kinds of other expenses to withstand tornados and a bunch of other stuff better. It cost him thousan ds more not to mention the taxes.

Construct'O
08-05-2007, 09:13 PM
I also know of young guy that just built a new large shop like your talking.He also made one end of it into his office and home.He is young up and coming contractor.

Get's an old timer thinking,how great it is to be young with so much energy.Slows down tho over the years.

As for his newly wed to be i'm not sure the office and home thing would be the best for them over time.Can always build home later after the new wears off and rent it out to the help.That was they will always be there for work.

Being single would work okay for me.

As far as incorprating the farm idea into business(construction side of things)you can't believe the breaks you can get.

Works for me and i don't have any trouble sleeping at night.Because i have them seperated as busniess,but get the benifits of both worlds.

Good luck.

Fieldman12
08-05-2007, 09:19 PM
I always look down the road also as what if something happens and I must sell it. From what it sounds like it is in the country. Most people don't need a barn that big except a farmer, trucking company, or excavator. Now there is other people such as a ag dealer but doubtful. Just saying if ever he has to sell or decides to sell his most potential buyer will be a farmer. If it is zoned to business a farmer will not touch it. On the good side make value of land a little more but unless it is almost in town he will never see the cost gain.

RockSet N' Grade
08-05-2007, 09:23 PM
Constructo........how's it going you old timer you :0 . I just got up from a little nap.......seems like they are needed more and more these days. Question for ya: can you share a picture of the trenching machine you use for your trenching jobs? If I was smart enough, I'd figure out how to post pics and share some of my equipment/barn pics.

Fieldman12
08-05-2007, 09:30 PM
The barn living quarters would probably not work for me either because of a woman but when your single or just starting out it is okay I guess.

qps
08-05-2007, 10:21 PM
Because it is going to cost you a ton of money with no advantage to it at all. Why throw money away especially if he can use it for farm purposes. My uncle has some farm land that just so happens to be in a business zone. He did not know until he started building. Because of this and even though it was going to be to store his 14 tractors in it cost him a bunch of extra money. They made him use a bunch of extra concrete and all kinds of other expenses to withstand tornados and a bunch of other stuff better. It cost him thousan ds more not to mention the taxes.

and all tax deductible......all I'm saying is I've been down that road....in the end it pays to work within your zoning ordinance's. trust me I don't want or care for the city and there bs requirements on a lot of things, out in the country I doubt if anyone will say anything, but in the city or close to it, it can be a risky undertaking...and legally if you take any equipment off site to work on construction or whatever, I doubt that qualify's as agricultural...justify it anyway you want, I'm only saying I've been there and wish I had just done it the right way the first time...would have saved me a lot of headaches....

wanabe
08-05-2007, 10:43 PM
Is this a post building? If so, do not put the posts in the ground. Have a shed full of rotting posts, and I am now need to change them out. My next one will have at least 24" of concrete foundation out of the ground. Then set the posts or 2x6 studs on top. I would also go with a 14 foot door. That way you can pull any truck in and not need to remove the stack(s). Don't ask me how I know! In floor heat is also a very good idea. I think the 1/2" pex tube is about $1 a foot and you generally run it back and forth every 15". Will run into some money, but worth it.

dozerman21
08-05-2007, 10:44 PM
dozerman, I'm looking at doing the same project. I was wondering how you plan to set the 6 X 6 main support post? I've heard of a few ways to accomplish this...simply cement them in the bore hole, with or without Sono-tube. Set them atop J-bolts and fab your own base plate. What is the prefered method to use here?


TonyG- I'm not sure yet. I'm going to leave that up to a friend of mine who's a carpenter. I think he's going to frame and maybe skin the barn. I'm waiting for him to give me a price. I know I'll have a concrete footer so the posts won't spear into the ground, but I'll leave the rest to him after I bore the holes. I'll let you know the approach when I get there.

Fieldman12- You make some good points, and I know guys that have gone that route, however, I don't think it would work for me. I only have 5 acres, and I plan to build a house on it, hopefully in a few years. I have newer homes around me, and I'm just outside of the city limits. QPS isn't very far from me, and our city has grown so much, I stayed away from where he is due to all the B.S. permits and zoning that you have to deal with. Before I start to cut wood, I'll look at all my options and talk to some guys in my area who have barns. Property taxes have really spiked here just in the last month, and it's making many people thinking about moving to a different area, or smaller house.

I don't do any farming, but I see your point about the sliding doors. I'll probably stick with the 14' overhead doors because I'm planning on living here for a long time, once we build a house. Plus, my property probably wouldn't be big enougn to suite most farmers. I think it's only a matter of time before I'll see a Walgreen's on a corner somewhere by me, or at least a subdivision. There's some nice newer houses close to me, but there's a lot of farm land too, some of which is for sale. That's why I want to get this built sooner than later, before my zoning changes.

BTW, the live-in quarters wouldn't bother me or my little boy, but I don't think my wife would care for it too much!:) It would make one hell of a bachelor pad though!:drinkup:

qps
08-05-2007, 10:52 PM
you should see what my taxes have done in franklin township...soon as my son if out of highschool I'm getting out, we where looking in johnson county but as near to the johnson / franklin township line..if you know of all land for sale keep me in mind.....I agree with install the widest door you can afford, we installed 12 x 12....wish I had went wider....you can see our shop under the pic's forum titled new shop pic's..I think.....

Fieldman12
08-05-2007, 11:03 PM
Yeah check in your area. I know a few in your simular situation. You wont get the cheap tax I doubt because you cannot show the income but it still can be a mini farm. I would not get too excited about changing it. Allot comes into play once you change it. There is tons of small business's around here in the country and it has not been an issue.

qps
08-05-2007, 11:12 PM
Yeah check in your area. I know a few in your simular situation. You wont get the cheap tax I doubt because you cannot show the income but it still can be a mini farm. I would not get too excited about changing it. Allot comes into play once you change it. There is tons of small business's around here in the country and it has not been an issue.


I agree...if you don't have to change it don't, it opens a new can of worms...if you can build it as is...I would do it...just don't make any neighbors mad:cool2:

AWJ Services
08-05-2007, 11:18 PM
If so, do not put the posts in the ground. Have a shed full of rotting posts,

Exactly right.
It easier too set the poles in a galvanized end cap and the use angle supports too bolt them down on top of a footer above ground.

Here there is no need for permitting a pole barn or barn as long as the floor is dirt .
After completion you can do what ever.

Construct'O
08-05-2007, 11:19 PM
Constructo........how's it going you old timer you :0 . I just got up from a little nap.......seems like they are needed more and more these days. Question for ya: can you share a picture of the trenching machine you use for your trenching jobs? If I was smart enough, I'd figure out how to post pics and share some of my equipment/barn pics.

Will be starting to trench sometime this week,hotter and dryer then crap here,so dridding to get started.I was hoping for cooler weather at least.

Had utilitys stake water lines and phones where i have to cross with the trencher,but they didn't go far enough ,so will have to get them back out tomorrow to locate.

Well get some pics posted with new thread when i get started.

Hy ! Get off the couch and learn how to post pictures.If i can do it so can you.Get with it!!!!!!!!:usflag:

muddstopper
08-13-2007, 08:40 PM
I aint going to get into the how to build a barn or zoning part of this thread. I just wanted to mention what a friend of mine did to get by all the extra taxes and such. He built his barn big enough to park a 85ft single wide mobile home inside. He lives in the trailer, parks his trucks in the barn and keeps the doors pulled down. You have to go inside the barn to enter the trailer which means rolling up that big door, but he doesnt have to, ( or just doesnt, I aint sure which),pay taxes on the mobile home.