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IN2MOWN
08-13-2007, 08:40 PM
Ive been in business for 7 years now and I feel like I should be further along then what I am so I would like to take a substanial step next year.

I work by myself and I take care of about 60 houses. I let some go last week that were complaining about numerous issues such as cost and how often I wanted to mow. On an average I would say the houses are around 10,000 sq feet. The smallest being 4,000 and the largest being 3 acres. I have no problem at all getting them done with a lot of extra time to spare during the week even in the growing season.

The services I offer include:

Mowing
Bed Mulching
Gutter Cleaning
Spring and Fall Cleanups
Renovations
Aerating
Bush and Hedge Trimming
Small Landscape Projects

I use Encore walkbehind mowers, I have a 48 and 36.

I have 2 3/4 ton trucks and 2 trailers. One single axle that is 12 feet long and one dual axle which is 16 feet long with walls.

I dont do chemicals. I sub them out to a company. I have no interest in doing them either. I tried it one year. To much paperwork and red tape for me.

My goal next year is to add about 30 - 40 new customers, upgrade my equipment to Wright Standers, buy other miscelaneous new equipment, and possibly hire someone to help me.

My question is what is the best way to accomplish this and what can I expect? I'm ready to make the leap to an "employer". I'm ready to take on some commercial lots. I'm ready to hit the big time. To be honest. I need to. The last few years I've been flying by the seat of my pants. I've never really advertised surviving by word of mouth. But now that my family is growing I need to seriously consider the future. I make a decent living now. I gross about $80,000 a year but the cost of living is going through the roof and to be honest I dont want to be 65 and finally paying my house off. I want to retire early and enjoy life.

Any ideas?

delphied
08-13-2007, 08:45 PM
Im solo and just started this year. I was chasing my 44 toro walk behind til late June when I bought a ZTR. I only have 20 accounts and I dont see how you do 60 with walkbehinds. You must already have help?

grassmedics
08-13-2007, 08:52 PM
The walk behinds arent that slow 60 a week is very easily accomplished with the equipment he has, but the wrights will cut down on that time even more. Good Luck to you in your venture, i myself just went to full time landscaper. :hammerhead:

IN2MOWN
08-13-2007, 08:54 PM
Im solo and just started this year. I was chasing my 44 toro walk behind til late June when I bought a ZTR. I only have 20 accounts and I dont see how you do 60 with walkbehinds. You must already have help?



Im solo. No help at all.

Albery's Lawn & Tractor
08-13-2007, 08:57 PM
If your solo why do you need 2 trucks? I would sell one and use that money for advertising.

privatelawn
08-13-2007, 08:59 PM
Advertise big time, March or so I will be spending about $5k on postcards which should be 20,000 or so all sent at once, anytime I send postcards I get about 2% in customers, out of 20000 postcards that would be 400 new customers but if I get just 100, 1 month will pay for it plus some. I have never really worked solo, I started with part time employees from day 1 and pretty much 100% of the profit went to the employees but I did not start broke and did not need the money, I also didnt start the business to be solo.

Vikings
08-13-2007, 09:02 PM
You're doing great and you're in a position to not do ANY work. Hire a crew and concentrate on sales and supervision.

I'm in your boat almost except my main thing has been window cleaning for 8 years and snow in the the winter. 2nd year in lawns. I actually think I went backward this year because I can't hear the damn phone ring anymore (lawn mowers) and I'm too tired from mowing to call up my window cleaning customers.

I'll tell you when I use help I make good money both in lawns and window cleaning. I'm going to focus on trying to keep one or two full time guys next spring and it has to be in lawns because it's hard to find a skilled window cleaner that likes unsteady work. PLus I think I kinda like being solo even though it's getting tiresome.

carcrz
08-13-2007, 09:03 PM
Advertise a lot. It's the best way to get your name out there. Also, try offering referrals discounts to your current customers.

bigbone
08-13-2007, 09:05 PM
Next year I plan on going door to door and begging people to hire me. Just kidding. Have you considered buying some accounts from other LCOs?

IN2MOWN
08-13-2007, 09:07 PM
If your solo why do you need 2 trucks? I would sell one and use that money for advertising.


I had one break down last year and I was down for 10 days. I bought another one and I keep the older one for backup.

IN2MOWN
08-13-2007, 09:08 PM
Next year I plan on going door to door and begging people to hire me. Just kidding. Have you considered buying some accounts from other LCOs?



Ive really always thought that buying accounts was a waste a money. Why buy it when you can get it for almost free if not free?

IN2MOWN
08-13-2007, 09:10 PM
You're doing great and you're in a position to not do ANY work. Hire a crew and concentrate on sales and supervision.

I'm in your boat almost except my main thing has been window cleaning for 8 years and snow in the the winter. 2nd year in lawns. I actually think I went backward this year because I can't hear the damn phone ring anymore (lawn mowers) and I'm too tired from mowing to call up my window cleaning customers.

I'll tell you when I use help I make good money both in lawns and window cleaning. I'm going to focus on trying to keep one or two full time guys next spring and it has to be in lawns because it's hard to find a skilled window cleaner that likes unsteady work. PLus I think I kinda like being solo even though it's getting tiresome.



I dont have near the income to pay a crew and have enough to live off of. It just wouldnt be enough with grossing only $80,000 a year.

I dont mind the work either in fact I really enjoy it. I dont think I would ever stop working in field no matter how big I got.

LindblomRJ
08-13-2007, 09:24 PM
It wouldn't take much to add a crew. You seem to have most your equipment. If you already have 60 accounts it wouldn't take much to add another 20 to 40 accounts to justify an expansion of a crew.

MassSteelerfan
08-13-2007, 09:36 PM
One quick tip, I would trade up from 48 to 52 or 60, because really need to go as large as possible to cut time. I know the 36 is needed to get through gates but after that I would go as large as possible.

IN2MOWN
08-13-2007, 09:38 PM
One quick tip, I would trade up from 48 to 52 or 60, because really need to go as large as possible to cut time. I know the 36 is needed to get through gates but after that I would go as large as possible.


What I planned on doing was keeping my 36 and 48 and upgrading to a 52 Stander and keeping all 3 on my trailer. Some of my backyards can take a 48 through the gate but not a 52. That way I wouldnt have to use the 36 on the backyards that I can 48.

IN2MOWN
08-13-2007, 09:41 PM
It wouldn't take much to add a crew. You seem to have most your equipment. If you already have 60 accounts it wouldn't take much to add another 20 to 40 accounts to justify an expansion of a crew.


What do you think would be the best way to add those yards? I had 0 luck with my yellow pages ad this year and Im seriously considering not renewing it.

1MajorTom
08-13-2007, 09:43 PM
If your solo why do you need 2 trucks? I would sell one and use that money for advertising.

Bad advice. NO company, solo or otherwise should be with just one truck. Too many times a truck can break down, and then what? Having a second truck is a must to ensure dependability on being able to continue servicing the accounts without interruption. Also the second truck which is used for the backup, can be used for "dirtier" jobs such as cleanups, mulch jobs, etc.

IN2MOWN
08-13-2007, 09:48 PM
Bad advice. NO company, solo or otherwise should be with just one truck. Too many times a truck can break down, and then what? Having a second truck is a must to ensure dependability on being able to continue servicing the accounts without interruption. Also the second truck which is used for the backup, can be used for "dirtier" jobs such as cleanups, mulch jobs, etc.



I lost mine by a freak occurence last year. A mouse chewed threw a piece of linkage on the throttle body while I was away on vacation last year. Turns out Ford no longer makes the part and quit selling it back in 04. I had to find one in a salvage yard up in Des Moines and have them UPS it to me.

In the meantime I bought a newer truck but vowed I would never not have a backup again.

Vikings
08-13-2007, 09:48 PM
I got two of everything as well. No truck for one week = out of business.

IN2MOWN
08-13-2007, 09:55 PM
I got two of everything as well. No truck for one week = out of business.

Same here. I have multiple of everything even though Im a one man show.

3 trimmers
2 blowers
2 mowers
2 trailers
2 trucks
2 catchers


ETC...

LindblomRJ
08-13-2007, 10:02 PM
What do you think would be the best way to add those yards? I had 0 luck with my yellow pages ad this year and Im seriously considering not renewing it.

It seem a lot of folk around here like to hand out door hangers. How did you end up with your first 60 accounts?

privatelawn
08-13-2007, 10:02 PM
Cheapest way of advertising for me = website, total cost to add a new customer about $1, average new customers per month from website 5

Scagguy
08-13-2007, 10:10 PM
Ive been in business for 7 years now and I feel like I should be further along then what I am so I would like to take a substanial step next year.

I work by myself and I take care of about 60 houses. I let some go last week that were complaining about numerous issues such as cost and how often I wanted to mow. On an average I would say the houses are around 10,000 sq feet. The smallest being 4,000 and the largest being 3 acres. I have no problem at all getting them done with a lot of extra time to spare during the week even in the growing season.

The services I offer include:

Mowing
Bed Mulching
Gutter Cleaning
Spring and Fall Cleanups
Renovations
Aerating
Bush and Hedge Trimming
Small Landscape Projects

I use Encore walkbehind mowers, I have a 48 and 36.

I have 2 3/4 ton trucks and 2 trailers. One single axle that is 12 feet long and one dual axle which is 16 feet long with walls.

I dont do chemicals. I sub them out to a company. I have no interest in doing them either. I tried it one year. To much paperwork and red tape for me.

My goal next year is to add about 30 - 40 new customers, upgrade my equipment to Wright Standers, buy other miscelaneous new equipment, and possibly hire someone to help me.

My question is what is the best way to accomplish this and what can I expect? I'm ready to make the leap to an "employer". I'm ready to take on some commercial lots. I'm ready to hit the big time. To be honest. I need to. The last few years I've been flying by the seat of my pants. I've never really advertised surviving by word of mouth. But now that my family is growing I need to seriously consider the future. I make a decent living now. I gross about $80,000 a year but the cost of living is going through the roof and to be honest I dont want to be 65 and finally paying my house off. I want to retire early and enjoy life.

Any ideas?

Here's what I did. I started out in this business last August when I bought out a small LCO. He had about 35 accounts at the time. I had some door hangers made and put them on every house in the block that one of my customers was on. Next thing was to hire a college kid to put the door hangers in a couple of other areas that was near my home. I got quite a few calls, met with every potential customer and sold myself. I have been in some form sales all of my life and enjoy talking with people. As of today, i have 154 accounts. I would say that 25-30 of those are referrals. I'm going to add another employee as soon as I can find a quality person. Next year my goal is to double my business by not being on a mower all day and do some serious marketing. You can do it if you really want to. Just be prepared to put the time and effort into it as well as buying more equipment as you grow.

IN2MOWN
08-13-2007, 10:38 PM
It seem a lot of folk around here like to hand out door hangers. How did you end up with your first 60 accounts?


Postcards and word of mouth.

HOOLIE
08-13-2007, 11:02 PM
You might do well to focus more on the other, non-mowing work to grow, at least initially...you could make a good bit more money vs. mowing and wouldn't have to buy much more equipment to make it work. A bad day of weed-pulling puts more money in my account than a good day of mowing.

It gives you some flexibility too...less headaches than mowing 100+ accounts weekly and less vulnerability to droughts. That's pretty much the way I am moving towards, I'd like to LOSE some mowing customers next season and work on having a steady flow of small landscape and cleanup jobs.

You already have the 2 trucks and trailers, very do-able for you.

KTO Enterprises
08-13-2007, 11:03 PM
Bad advice. NO company, solo or otherwise should be with just one truck. Too many times a truck can break down, and then what? Having a second truck is a must to ensure dependability on being able to continue servicing the accounts without interruption. Also the second truck which is used for the backup, can be used for "dirtier" jobs such as cleanups, mulch jobs, etc.

My sentiments exactly. Time is too precious to wait weeks for truck repairs. Shops worth using will often be backed up a week or more. Always have 2 trucks.

GrassBustersLawn
08-14-2007, 07:00 AM
Ive been in business for 7 years now and I feel like I should be further along then what I am so I would like to take a substanial step next year.

I work by myself and I take care of about 60 houses. I let some go last week that were complaining about numerous issues such as cost and how often I wanted to mow. On an average I would say the houses are around 10,000 sq feet. The smallest being 4,000 and the largest being 3 acres. I have no problem at all getting them done with a lot of extra time to spare during the week even in the growing season.

The services I offer include:

Mowing
Bed Mulching
Gutter Cleaning
Spring and Fall Cleanups
Renovations
Aerating
Bush and Hedge Trimming
Small Landscape Projects

I use Encore walkbehind mowers, I have a 48 and 36.

I have 2 3/4 ton trucks and 2 trailers. One single axle that is 12 feet long and one dual axle which is 16 feet long with walls.

I dont do chemicals. I sub them out to a company. I have no interest in doing them either. I tried it one year. To much paperwork and red tape for me.

My goal next year is to add about 30 - 40 new customers, upgrade my equipment to Wright Standers, buy other miscelaneous new equipment, and possibly hire someone to help me.

My question is what is the best way to accomplish this and what can I expect? I'm ready to make the leap to an "employer". I'm ready to take on some commercial lots. I'm ready to hit the big time. To be honest. I need to. The last few years I've been flying by the seat of my pants. I've never really advertised surviving by word of mouth. But now that my family is growing I need to seriously consider the future. I make a decent living now. I gross about $80,000 a year but the cost of living is going through the roof and to be honest I dont want to be 65 and finally paying my house off. I want to retire early and enjoy life.

Any ideas?

WOW, if you think the paperwork & red tape is alot for CHEMICALS, wait until you HIRE AN EMPLOYEE. You reach a WHOLE NEW LEVEL of RED TAPE & PAPERWORK!!!!!!!! WORK COMP Insurance, issuing W-2's, filing State paperwork monthly, etc.

First thing I'd do is get over the fear factor on fert/squirt and do it (legally, of course). Personally, in my operation, it is the most profitable operation (next to snow plowing).

I do agree with having a back up for everything.

If I were you, I'd consider adding a 60" mower instead of 48". The difference in productivity between the two will amaze you. Even on "smaller" yards.

Mike

IN2MOWN
08-14-2007, 07:51 AM
WOW, if you think the paperwork & red tape is alot for CHEMICALS, wait until you HIRE AN EMPLOYEE. You reach a WHOLE NEW LEVEL of RED TAPE & PAPERWORK!!!!!!!! WORK COMP Insurance, issuing W-2's, filing State paperwork monthly, etc.

First thing I'd do is get over the fear factor on fert/squirt and do it (legally, of course). Personally, in my operation, it is the most profitable operation (next to snow plowing).

I do agree with having a back up for everything.

If I were you, I'd consider adding a 60" mower instead of 48". The difference in productivity between the two will amaze you. Even on "smaller" yards.

Mike


I know there is a lot of paperwork but most of it is stuff my accountant can do.

Fert is profitable here also but I have a great deal with a local company, we scratch each others back. They dont mow and I dont do apps. It works out well.

I do plan on adding bigger mowers.

nobagger
08-14-2007, 08:45 AM
Many people are in the same boat. Just remember with expansion comes less profit in some cases. I would definetly keep those other mowers if they are making you money and maybe buy a slightly used or new rider for more productivity. Advertising consistantly is always a good thing but you need to be available to give bids, so hiring even one other guy would be worth it. I dont know about where you live but around here, 10 lawns are hard to pick up let-alone 30.

txgrassguy
08-14-2007, 09:32 AM
Back in July 2001 I went full time with my grounds maintenance business. Till then I was running a golf course and consulting a bit but the company down sized and I wasn't about to take yet another pay cut.
I started with a Scag 36", a Murray 21" wb and residential Homelite equipment.
The haul vehicle was a 83 F150 with an 8' tilt trailer. I grossed maybe $40K that first year. Near the end of '01 I had a couple of guys, mostly 3 days a week and I did the rest.
I mention this as I seriously sat back and planned for my expansion and today I have nine full time and three part time employees, three trucks, five trailers and over $280K in equipment alone - all paid for except $8K worth and the interest rates don't warrant paying off early. My gross this year will be $700K+ and I got here by planning, advertising, training my crews and delegating certain tasks and falling back into a more supervisory/administrative role.
For me the three best advertisements were word of mouth from quality work, the local yellow pages and radio advertisements. I landed one job from the radio worth over $65K+, not bad for an investment of $1200.
You can do it but what I have learned is this:
1. Plan out a business strategy
2. Implement a financial plan the STICK TO IT REGARDLESS!
3. Implement a rigorous interview/employee process. Everyone is subject to random drug screening after the mandatory screen prior to hiring. Criminal background checks are a must.
4. Find a good bank, talk to the commercial lending officer, usually a vp of the bank and develop a personal one on one relationship.
5. Join your local chamber of commerce
6. Join your local builder's association
7. Expand the services you offer, be it fert/squirt, irrigation, trees, regardless - in these economic times the key to sustained growth is diversification.
8. Advertise - meet with the local yellow page and radio people and develop the same relationship you have with the bank.
Running a successful business, regardless of the type, is all about market placement and correct financials.
Scary, not really - a bunch of work - YES.
Yet the pay off is in two years I will have sold my business, pocketed at least $500K after all expenses, bonuses, etc and will be on to a different vocation.
In my case I am returning to academia - this time to terrorize undergraduate students :)
Good luck,
Steve

causalitist
08-14-2007, 01:40 PM
Cheapest way of advertising for me = website, total cost to add a new customer about $1, average new customers per month from website 5

can we see your site? i'd like to.

mowingtowing
08-14-2007, 02:15 PM
If you end up going and getting an employee (or more than 1), I HIGHLY recommend getting a payroll company. We use Paycycle and have had a great experience with them. My wife tried to do it herself the first year and it was a disaster. Go with them from the start and they'll make sure you do everything exactly how its supposed to happen and you don't have any trouble with the IRS or your state.

IN2MOWN
08-14-2007, 05:58 PM
Back in July 2001 I went full time with my grounds maintenance business. Till then I was running a golf course and consulting a bit but the company down sized and I wasn't about to take yet another pay cut.
I started with a Scag 36", a Murray 21" wb and residential Homelite equipment.
The haul vehicle was a 83 F150 with an 8' tilt trailer. I grossed maybe $40K that first year. Near the end of '01 I had a couple of guys, mostly 3 days a week and I did the rest.
I mention this as I seriously sat back and planned for my expansion and today I have nine full time and three part time employees, three trucks, five trailers and over $280K in equipment alone - all paid for except $8K worth and the interest rates don't warrant paying off early. My gross this year will be $700K+ and I got here by planning, advertising, training my crews and delegating certain tasks and falling back into a more supervisory/administrative role.
For me the three best advertisements were word of mouth from quality work, the local yellow pages and radio advertisements. I landed one job from the radio worth over $65K+, not bad for an investment of $1200.
You can do it but what I have learned is this:
1. Plan out a business strategy
2. Implement a financial plan the STICK TO IT REGARDLESS!
3. Implement a rigorous interview/employee process. Everyone is subject to random drug screening after the mandatory screen prior to hiring. Criminal background checks are a must.
4. Find a good bank, talk to the commercial lending officer, usually a vp of the bank and develop a personal one on one relationship.
5. Join your local chamber of commerce
6. Join your local builder's association
7. Expand the services you offer, be it fert/squirt, irrigation, trees, regardless - in these economic times the key to sustained growth is diversification.
8. Advertise - meet with the local yellow page and radio people and develop the same relationship you have with the bank.
Running a successful business, regardless of the type, is all about market placement and correct financials.
Scary, not really - a bunch of work - YES.
Yet the pay off is in two years I will have sold my business, pocketed at least $500K after all expenses, bonuses, etc and will be on to a different vocation.
In my case I am returning to academia - this time to terrorize undergraduate students :)
Good luck,
Steve


Where is a good idea to start when designing and implementing a business plan?

JayD
08-14-2007, 06:23 PM
WOW, if you think the paperwork & red tape is alot for CHEMICALS, wait until you HIRE AN EMPLOYEE. You reach a WHOLE NEW LEVEL of RED TAPE & PAPERWORK!!!!!!!! WORK COMP Insurance, issuing W-2's, filing State paperwork monthly, etc.

First thing I'd do is get over the fear factor on fert/squirt and do it (legally, of course). Personally, in my operation, it is the most profitable operation (next to snow plowing).

I do agree with having a back up for everything.

If I were you, I'd consider adding a 60" mower instead of 48". The difference in productivity between the two will amaze you. Even on "smaller" yards.

Mike

Hey Mike, If you don't mind me asking, how many customers do you have?
Res/ comm.accounts? and how long in business?
For me, its my first. Not many accounts, but I also only kind of do it part time. I do electrical full time.
Thanks, Jay

topsites
08-14-2007, 06:44 PM
Yeah, I think you've got a good thing going, just personal opinion of mine, for whatever it's worth you have my thumbs up, and best of luck. No I am not being funny, you may wish to consider some paid advertising, sounds to me like you have the money, invest wisely.


off track:
Im solo and just started this year. I was chasing my 44 toro walk behind til late June when I bought a ZTR. I only have 20 accounts and I dont see how you do 60 with walkbehinds. You must already have help?

It takes practice, something like 1,000 lawns cut before I could consider myself a half wit.
2,000 lawns into it I could probably say I was getting pretty good.
After 3,000 one should be an expert, but at least somewhere on the way there.

Don't fight the machine, best advice I can give, and if you want fast get a velke.

I've had 55 accounts before and I felt some slack but it did work me, two 48" wb's all I had...
It's not that big of a deal, I don't think, to go 60, the speed comes with the years, man has seven in, means he's likely cut 3500+ (or 4-5,000) lawns so far, maybe more or less, give or take, but I believe it.

The only part I don't see is the 80g... I made 34 that year with 55, 37g the next with 45...

IN2MOWN
08-14-2007, 07:06 PM
Yeah, I think you've got a good thing going, just personal opinion of mine, for whatever it's worth you have my thumbs up, and best of luck. No I am not being funny, you may wish to consider some paid advertising, sounds to me like you have the money, invest wisely.


off track:


It takes practice, something like 1,000 lawns cut before I could consider myself a half wit.
2,000 lawns into it I could probably say I was getting pretty good.
After 3,000 one should be an expert, but at least somewhere on the way there.

Don't fight the machine, best advice I can give, and if you want fast get a velke.

I've had 55 accounts before and I felt some slack but it did work me, two 48" wb's all I had...
It's not that big of a deal, I don't think, to go 60, the speed comes with the years, man has seven in, means he's likely cut 3500+ (or 4-5,000) lawns so far, maybe more or less, give or take, but I believe it.

The only part I don't see is the 80g... I made 34 that year with 55, 37g the next with 45...



On average my customers will spend around $1300.00 a year for my services. Thats on a $35.00 per cut yard.

txgrassguy
08-14-2007, 08:40 PM
Where is a good idea to start when designing and implementing a business plan?
This is where your professional associations come into play.
For instance the local chamber of commerce has all sorts of demographic information you can use, same as with a builder's association.
Also the personal relationship you have with your bank as far as advising on the local housing market, how the economy is affecting your local market and all sorts of trends, ie school attendance, fore closures or mortgages applied for, construction loans outstanding - in short all sorts of information is literally one or two visits away which will tell you how your local market is doing, what services they need and how to position yourself to capitalize on these opportunities.
I cannot tell you what to do in your market, I'm not there - but I cannot stress this enough - mine the thoughts of your local chamber of commerce and bank and you will never regret it. Remember - DIVERSIFICATION! - see #7.
Good Luck,
Steve

IN2MOWN
08-14-2007, 08:59 PM
This is where your professional associations come into play.
For instance the local chamber of commerce has all sorts of demographic information you can use, same as with a builder's association.
Also the personal relationship you have with your bank as far as advising on the local housing market, how the economy is affecting your local market and all sorts of trends, ie school attendance, fore closures or mortgages applied for, construction loans outstanding - in short all sorts of information is literally one or two visits away which will tell you how your local market is doing, what services they need and how to position yourself to capitalize on these opportunities.
I cannot tell you what to do in your market, I'm not there - but I cannot stress this enough - mine the thoughts of your local chamber of commerce and bank and you will never regret it. Remember - DIVERSIFICATION! - see #7.
Good Luck,
Steve

I appreciate it. Thank you.

txgrassguy
08-15-2007, 12:49 AM
Glad I could help.

JimLewis
08-15-2007, 03:22 AM
I dont have near the income to pay a crew and have enough to live off of. It just wouldnt be enough with grossing only $80,000 a year.
Actually, you do. You just don't realize it. You may take a hit for a few months. But once you begin to focus most of your time on GETTING new business rather than doing the work, you'd find that you were able to grow very quickly and within even as little as a month or two, if you play your cards right, you could easily be in the position to make that $160K gross for the year.

I dont mind the work either in fact I really enjoy it. I dont think I would ever stop working in field no matter how big I got.

Well, I think that's your downfall then. Because you can't do both. You can't run a company with several employees and take your business to the next level AND still keep doing the mowing yourself every day. There simply isn't enough time in the day and you don't have enough energy. You really have to pick one or the other. Either you mow lawns the rest of your life. OR you chose to step away from that and run a business. But you can't straddle the fence. You can't play both sides. One of the two endeavors will eat up most of your time and energy and the other will get neglected.

I think it's probably time to take a serious look at what you want to do with the rest of your life.

IN2MOWN
08-15-2007, 07:25 AM
Actually, you do. You just don't realize it. You may take a hit for a few months. But once you begin to focus most of your time on GETTING new business rather than doing the work, you'd find that you were able to grow very quickly and within even as little as a month or two, if you play your cards right, you could easily be in the position to make that $160K gross for the year.



Well, I think that's your downfall then. Because you can't do both. You can't run a company with several employees and take your business to the next level AND still keep doing the mowing yourself every day. There simply isn't enough time in the day and you don't have enough energy. You really have to pick one or the other. Either you mow lawns the rest of your life. OR you chose to step away from that and run a business. But you can't straddle the fence. You can't play both sides. One of the two endeavors will eat up most of your time and energy and the other will get neglected.

I think it's probably time to take a serious look at what you want to do with the rest of your life.



I never really thought of it that way...

All in all I want to run a business. I guess I cant do that busting ass in the field 12 hours a day. Probably time to make some changes.

deere-man
08-16-2007, 04:58 PM
I'd definetely suggest advertising. Make up some business cards, and post an add in the paper when spring comes. The newspaper is viewed by a lot of people, so it should provide some customers.

IN2MOWN
08-16-2007, 06:11 PM
I'd definetely suggest advertising. Make up some business cards, and post an add in the paper when spring comes. The newspaper is viewed by a lot of people, so it should provide some customers.

Ive advertised before but very sparsely. I think next spring Im going to try door hangers. Ive never used them before but Ive heard very good things about them.