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View Full Version : How many hours on an oil change?


rh455
08-14-2007, 09:40 PM
I've got about 8.5 hours on my mower(Kawi 19) and I was told to do the first oil change at 8ish. How often after that? What brand oil and what weight? Dino or synthetic? What brand filter?

J&R Landscaping
08-14-2007, 10:09 PM
After the first 5-10 hours, you should change the oil. At that point, I run synthetic oil in my machines. I use Mobil 1 synthetic or Amsoil Formula 4 stroke oil. (Thats "made specially" for lawnmower engines and such.) SAE 10w30. Also, I run the OEM oil filters, in which case the cost about $7.50 each.

I'm oldschool with my oil changes and even though I have synthetic oil in the engine, the oil gets changed every 60-65 hours.

causalitist
08-14-2007, 10:19 PM
the manual for my kawi says oil every 100hours and filter every 200hours.

i'm following the recommendations only because i use really good synth oil and a high capacity 15 micron oil filter. ... and a oiled prefilter.

if i was using dino ,stock filters and a non oiled prefilter like kawi recommends, (go figure) i'd be doing both at 50 hours.

whats the part # on the current oil filter? call up amsoil for a match.

i believe my 15hp uses a EAo09 amsoil filter ... same as my motorcycle, so its fairly likely that'l be yours too.

DLAWNS
08-14-2007, 10:20 PM
I've always been told every 100 hours after the first 10.

growabiz
08-14-2007, 10:24 PM
After 10 hours change the oil and filter. After that you should change it every 50 hours even though the engine manufacturer recommends every 100 hours. This is critical especially if you live down south.

Be cautious about synthetic oil especially in a new engine. It takes about 300+ hours to seat the rings. If you put it in they will not seat properly and loss of power will occur.

Hope this helps.

MOturkey
08-14-2007, 10:31 PM
Changed oil at 8 hours, then at 50, and every 50 after that (easier to remember if on the 50's and 100's). The book says 100, and I've no doubt that would be OK, but I always treat the engine like I'm going to own the mower for the rest of my life, whether I do or not.

As for synthetic, I changed to it on the 8 hour oil change on my last mower with no problems (800 hours), and did the same on this one.

causalitist
08-14-2007, 10:31 PM
oops .. my kawi uses EAo57

it was my kohler that used the same as my bike - eao09

rh455
08-15-2007, 01:47 AM
I was planning on waiting to switch to synthetic (Royal Purple) after 200 to give the rings time to seat. Does any other filter manufacturer (like Wix, Napa Gold, etc.) make an equivalent filter?

KS_Grasscutter
08-15-2007, 01:51 AM
Oil and filter at 50 hours. I use Kohler 10w30 in both mowers, and the higher capacity filters.

fiveoboy01
08-15-2007, 04:30 AM
I did the first change on my mowers at 8 hours as recommended.

I've switched to synthetic and change the oil and filter every 50 hours rather than the recommended 100. Some of the conditions I mow in are pretty dusty and dirty, and I am certain that it can't hurt to shorten the interval. Oil isn't that expensive compared to a prematurely fried engine.

swingset
08-15-2007, 05:59 AM
Be cautious about synthetic oil especially in a new engine. It takes about 300+ hours to seat the rings. If you put it in they will not seat properly and loss of power will occur.

I'd like to see objective evidence of that claim.

Richard Martin
08-15-2007, 07:14 AM
I'd like to see objective evidence of that claim.

So would I. Corvettes and other cars come with Mobil 1 as the factory fill.

Does any other filter manufacturer (like Wix, Napa Gold, etc.) make an equivalent filter?

Yes. Purolator L14476 or PL14476. You can cross reference from those numbers to your favorite brand of filter.

swingset
08-15-2007, 08:51 AM
So would I. Corvettes and other cars come with Mobil 1 as the factory fill.

Yeah, but it's not like the Corvette is a high performance car with a hot engine or anything. :dizzy:

I've never seen a reasonable explaination why rings won't seat with syn. oil but will with dino.

Tlvoskamp
08-15-2007, 08:59 AM
I live out in West Texas where there is substantial dust and dirt on a regular basis, and I change my oil every 25 hours. I figure oil is cheap and ZTR's are expensive so I like to baby all of my machines. I use Kohler Magnum 30wt. oil.

Tlvoskamp

LwnmwrMan22
08-15-2007, 09:01 AM
Yeah, but it's not like the Corvette is a high performance car with a hot engine or anything. :dizzy:

I've never seen a reasonable explaination why rings won't seat with syn. oil but will with dino.

Years ago you were told to not switch to synthetic right away, to get the engine broke in first.

It's the same thing when people say don't switch to synthetic when your engine is old either, that the rings will leak.

Basically they're both myths from people that didn't believe that you could switch to a synthetic oil.

We have a local radio talk show, an auto show, where the guy still swears that you have to change your oil every 3,000 miles, even though there's car manufacturers now where the service intervals are 7,500 or even 15,000 miles listed in the book.

It's not the oil that goes bad, it's the filter.

Personally I change my oil about every 400 hours, but the filter every 200 hours.

Richard Martin
08-15-2007, 04:47 PM
It's the same thing when people say don't switch to synthetic when your engine is old either, that the rings will leak.

Basically they're both myths from people that didn't believe that you could switch to a synthetic oil.

We have a local radio talk show, an auto show, where the guy still swears that you have to change your oil every 3,000 miles, even though there's car manufacturers now where the service intervals are 7,500 or even 15,000 miles listed in the book.

I switched my F-150 over to Pennzoil Platinum 10w30 full synthetic at 116,000 miles from regular Pennzoil 10w30 dino oil. It has used 1 quart of oil in 3,000 miles and I plan to push it to 10,000 miles per OCI. I use Purolator Pure 1 filters or Motorcraft, whichever is available.

I have had my wife's Cobalt on the same oil but a 5w20 since the first change at 3,000 miles. It's up over 24,000 miles now and hasn't used a drop of oil. OCI's are via the computer's recommendations and average about 12,000 miles.

topsites
08-15-2007, 07:33 PM
You guys might want to go check out bobistheoilguy.com (http://bobistheoilguy.com/), should answer most to all of your questions.

causalitist
08-16-2007, 02:44 AM
Years ago you were told to not switch to synthetic right away, to get the engine broke in first.

It's the same thing when people say don't switch to synthetic when your engine is old either, that the rings will leak.

Basically they're both myths from people that didn't believe that you could switch to a synthetic oil.

We have a local radio talk show, an auto show, where the guy still swears that you have to change your oil every 3,000 miles, even though there's car manufacturers now where the service intervals are 7,500 or even 15,000 miles listed in the book.

It's not the oil that goes bad, it's the filter.

Personally I change my oil about every 400 hours, but the filter every 200 hours.

400 hours? what oil you use?

Richard Martin
08-16-2007, 04:40 AM
You guys might want to go check out bobistheoilguy.com (http://bobistheoilguy.com/), should answer most to all of your questions.

I've been going there for years. They argue/debate these same subjects to death just like we do.

mverick
08-16-2007, 05:18 AM
It's not the oil that goes bad, it's the filter.



Uh, not exactly.

Ever run a turbo hot? You can scorch the oil. Even synthetic. Oil will burn if you get it to hot remember. And, the oil doesn't go bad but the additive package wears out. And, the cleaning the oil does can over load the oil. Your filter doesn't go down to 1 micron. And, there are particles in suspension that small. Guess what, they build up. Guess how you get rid of them? You change the oil.

I use a bypass filter on my diesels. It goes down to 1 micron. On the new diesel the oil still looks clean. On the old one, it doesn't. But there are a lot of years without a bypass filter.

And, synthetics do have a thinner film. That's part of the plus to them for the new cars. Less gap and still seals. Where dino would shear. So, yea, going from dino to syn you could have a problem with oil usage.

rh455
08-16-2007, 10:59 AM
A friend suggested that I step up to 20w50 when switching to synthetic for that reason. I live in the deep south and it stays in the high 90's for most of the grass cutting season. He has the same mower that I do with about 1000 hours on it. He's been using 20w50 synthetic since new. Do you think this would be the smart thing to do?

topsites
08-16-2007, 01:34 PM
A friend suggested that I step up to 20w50 when switching to synthetic for that reason. I live in the deep south and it stays in the high 90's for most of the grass cutting season. He has the same mower that I do with about 1000 hours on it. He's been using 20w50 synthetic since new. Do you think this would be the smart thing to do?

No way, I use that molasses crap as chainsaw bar oil, no joke.
I believe synthetic is more consistent with temperature as compared to dyno.

As in, when it's cold synth is almost as fluid as at normal temps, but dyno gets thick. Hence why synth provides better start up protection. Once it heats up, it's the dyno that thins out considerably, a HOT dyno 10w-30 is almost as thin as water, but synth only thins out a little, hence why a thinner synth is required for most optemps (it thickens less as it gets cold, thins less as it heats up).

Either way, synth provides such superior protection, I can't see you being able to go too thin, but go too thick and it affects performance... Too thin might seem like it doesn't provide enough lubrication, but too thick can cause this when it can't get past the rings just as well.

I run 5w-30 in most of my stuff, wish I hadn't bought so much of it, still have a slew of 10w-30 to go through, I eventually want to run a 0w-15 or thereabouts, maybe 5w-20 but no way I'd run no chainsaw bar oil in my engines.

I've been going there for years. They argue/debate these same subjects to death just like we do.

Ohhh yeah, well I just read the bits on his web site, I don't mess with their forums, one argument's enough for me.

Nosmo
08-16-2007, 03:07 PM
In my pickup truck I can drive @2,500 RPM and at approximately 55 MPH. If I run it at that speed from my house I can go to Los Angles, CA and back in about 50 hours. That is just about 3,000 miles.

I don't think it would hurt my 23hp Kawasaki to have the oil changed at 50 hours and the filter along with it. That little engine is turning at least 3,650 RPM and working hard.

Castrol HD and GTX are my choice of oil. Been using Castrol in my cars and mowers since the 1970's and I am OK with it.

Nosmo

mverick
08-16-2007, 03:25 PM
No way, I use that molasses crap as chainsaw bar oil, no joke.
I believe synthetic is more consistent with temperature as compared to dyno.

As in, when it's cold synth is almost as fluid as at normal temps, but dyno gets thick. Hence why synth provides better start up protection. Once it heats up, it's the dyno that thins out considerably, a HOT dyno 10w-30 is almost as thin as water, but synth only thins out a little, hence why a thinner synth is required for most optemps (it thickens less as it gets cold, thins less as it heats up).

Either way, synth provides such superior protection, I can't see you being able to go too thin, but go too thick and it affects performance... Too thin might seem like it doesn't provide enough lubrication, but too thick can cause this when it can't get past the rings just as well.

I run 5w-30 in most of my stuff, wish I hadn't bought so much of it, still have a slew of 10w-30 to go through, I eventually want to run a 0w-15 or thereabouts, maybe 5w-20 but no way I'd run no chainsaw bar oil in my engines.



Ohhh yeah, well I just read the bits on his web site, I don't mess with their forums, one argument's enough for me.

Synthetics usually have a broader range. They used to have a 0-50w. But, now the rate them more like dino because people didn't understand what to use. A 10w-30 is a 10w-30 no matter dino or syn. Difference is the syn will be more stable if you get cold. Broader temp range to stay a 10w-30. But, if you go past the temp limit your manufacturer states you should use a thinner oil. SO, if your in alaska you shouldn't use a 10w30. During the Cold Cold winter you shouldn't use a 10w30. The oil specs for dino and syn state that. And who is running there lawn mower in 0 degree or below weather.

The problem with the oil being thick is also strain on components. As in, they are pushing themselves through goo while trying to run. But, if you have the right rated oil in your car for the enviroment you drive in. It's the same Dino or Syn.

The big plus for syn is it's heat resistence. Meaning it's tougher to Scorch. But, my friends turbo Conquest with the HKS kit on it. When he cranked up the boost and ran it hard once. It always scorched the oil. He'd have to change it that day. It was junk. He always ran SYN in it too. He also went through 4 engines learning this. Covered under warranty though... LOL.. Sold the car when the warranty went out.

Bad about Syn is it will hold and attract moisture. So if your engine sits for long periods of time. Like over the winter. You better be starting them and running them for 20min every 2 -3weeks or you might have a problem with rust. You need to do it with dino if you start it and don't let it come up to operating temp. That's condensation. Syn attracts it itself. Not a problem for an everyday driver. But for the once in a while driver. Can cause problems.

I would stick with your manufacturers rated oil for you motor. Going to a 0-15 isn't what was intended. If it's rated for a 10w-30 and you go to a 5w-30 you're good. Going to a 0w-15 your viscosity is thinner then the manufacturer recomends. Meaning the thickness on the walls and in the bearings is thinner. More room to slap and tear stuff up. Also, if it's thinner it has an easier path into the combustion chamber to increase oil usage.

A good Dino is just as good for the heat resistence. The bad is everyone thinks your using crappy oil... LOL.. Good dino ain't what you buy at wal mart though. And it's easier to just buy an off the shelf synthetic. To be honest, until your running high performance turbo's there really isn't a great safety margin for the syn...

Some of the high end oil producers still use dino. There is a reason for that.

Your engine safety margin is all in the additive packages. The oil is just a carrier.

The oil tech that we had said he put 40,000 miles on his oil and it was a hydrocracked dino. He just did filter changes plus 1 quart. And that the oil tests showed at 40,000 it was still good. He just wanted to change to a different oil. The new one had 30,000 on it. He said he was going to run it till it went bad. Wish I knew when it went bad. LOL.. He drove around 80,000 a year. And wasn't trying to sell us that oil. He was selling industrial oils and greases for gear boxes and conveying systems for us. We needed both food grade and non food grade.

Scagguy
08-16-2007, 04:31 PM
I live out in West Texas where there is substantial dust and dirt on a regular basis, and I change my oil every 25 hours. I figure oil is cheap and ZTR's are expensive so I like to baby all of my machines. I use Kohler Magnum 30wt. oil.

Tlvoskamp

I change my oil and filters at 25 hours as well. I have several properties that really kick up the dust while I'm on them. Another reason is I'm always in a hurry to get as many yards done before it's gets hot. When I fire up the engines first thing in the am they may see 30-45 seconds of warm up time before running WOT.

fiveoboy01
08-16-2007, 07:05 PM
It's not the oil that goes bad, it's the filter.



I Hope you don't believe that, and I hope you're not giving that out as advice... Cause it's completely false.

rh455
08-16-2007, 11:45 PM
One thing that I don't like about dino oils is that it leaves more residue on the inside of the engine and in the pan. Every engine that we've built and tore it down after several years of racing abuse shows a crystal clean pan and inside. Inside of every dino motor I've seen has residue build up and sludge in some instances. I helped a buddy build a 600hp Olds engine that he broke in with dino oil then switched to synthetic on the first oil change. The rings never did seal well so we had to pull it down, hone it and put a set of rings in it. Second time he ran dino for the first three oil changes.