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advantage landscaping
09-15-2007, 12:17 PM
This came up in another thread so I thought I would put it in a new one. I know there are a lot of young guys on here ( myself being 16 ) and I think the hardest part for us is people not wanting to pay higher prices because we look younger. I do a job thats at least five times better than what the 4 Mexicans do next door and they are 30 years+ at least. But I am sure someone, for the same price, would have them do it than have me...

How do you deal with this? I have tried to do a lot of my quoting over the phone especially if the person isn't always home. What do you guys think?

privatelawn
09-15-2007, 01:25 PM
Im 29 but look younger maybe about 24 or so, I have always noticed being young had me losing a few bids... I started doing everything over the phone, bids are done by phone, there is nothing for customers to sign, my time isnt wasted doing bids. About half my customers have never met me. Its been 1 year since I started business and have almost 100 customers and I quit looking for new customers a long time ago.

RedMax Man
09-15-2007, 02:11 PM
Age has affected many jobs that i've priced, I'm not positive that it was the only factor but i'm sure it did impact the customers disicion whether or not to hire me. I've had customer ask me when i hand them the bid, " how old are you". Some are impressed but others think i'm a bit out of my mind or won't be what i say i will be. I'm 18 and 6'2" so some that though i was in my 20's are surprised.

I had a friend's father once tell me, " i hire you just because your young" afterwards i though to myself i wonder if thats why some people do hire me and then when i'm older will i lose all my accounts to the next junior. So far that hasn't happen and the customers have been loyal for the most part.

PlantGuys
09-15-2007, 05:25 PM
IMHO, it's not your age necessarily that people will notice, but the level of your maturity. If you stand behind your work (professionalism), show up and do what you say you will (integrity and dependability), and treat people with respect, I don't see any reason why you can't be successful in the residential market.

However, if you venture into the commercial side of the industry, age is very much a factor. While I don't know an exact age, I think 25 is a good age- and the automobile industry sets this age as their mature driver age.

Just my two copper pieces.

SangerLawn
09-15-2007, 06:56 PM
ipsmowing
I believe you missed the point on the other thread. It was not JUST your age that was brought up. It was the mix between your age, no insurance, no commercial equipment except a scag mower and charging the same as a company backed with experience and equipment.

Again I will make the point that made you start this thread. While you are young with no to very little bills, this would be a great time to charge half as much as a grown company. In all reality you would be profiting about the same because you donít have the same over head as a company with employees and payments. When you see a company making 50-75 dollars an hour while mowing, that is not what they are pocketing. They have shop payments, employees to pay, gas to drive all over the place, where and tare, electricity and so many more (not to mention you probably donít pay taxes on what you make). If you have employees they are 10x harder on equipment then you areÖ it isnít thereís so they donít care about it, therefore more parts, labor, and down time that you donít have.

By charging less you will get more customers, begin to grow, spread your name, show that you are a reliable company, and start to be able to afford insurance and other things needed. Then you can begin to raise your prices as you build a stronger name for your self and able to compete with surrounding companies, not just the Mexicans next door as you put it.

Again I will say what I said before, I donít care if you are making $500.00 an hour, if you only work 10 minutes a week your not doing what needs to be done. If you profit $15.00 for every 30 minutes that you work, you are doing great (if you can get very little to no drive time between job sites) There for with no over head, a normal $30.00 lawn you can do for half that, make a nice pay check and pick up more customers. Again if you read the other thread you will see that it was recommended to only do this in a subdivision where you will have little to no drive time. Knock out 2 or 3 lawns without moving your truck and maybe 10-15 without driving more then a mile. Trust me, most people are willing to pay 15 dollars to a uninsured company to mow. Again do this to get income so you can grow, then slowly raise your prices and most of the people wont leave you because they know youíre a good worker no matter your age.

HOOLIE
09-15-2007, 08:01 PM
This came up in another thread so I thought I would put it in a new one. I know there are a lot of young guys on here ( myself being 16 ) and I think the hardest part for us is people not wanting to pay higher prices because we look younger. I do a job thats at least five times better than what the 4 Mexicans do next door and they are 30 years+ at least. But I am sure someone, for the same price, would have them do it than have me...

How do you deal with this? I have tried to do a lot of my quoting over the phone especially if the person isn't always home. What do you guys think?

I think no matter how good of a job you do, you'll always be looked at as a kid...and a lot of customers will just naturally expect you to work for less money than an adult-run business. Just the way it is. I know I would have a hard time paying a high school kid $40 to mow my lawn.

advantage landscaping
09-15-2007, 08:05 PM
haha so actually I think we are in the same boat for this. You're talking about taking half (15) for a 30 or 35$ lawn. I am doing that now - its just 40 or 50$ instead of 80 - 100$.

Also I do all my mowing on a fairly odd schedule. I have lots of time during the summer for working but - once the school year starts, then sports, homework, and so on, there's no more time. So I have to get everything done quickly in one or two days. I don't have all week - I wish I did but I figure #2 in my class will get me somewhere other than landscaping for a job when I'm older even if I like doing it...

I am looking at a trailer for next year. I had one purchased (signed the title and all) before the insurance company (car insurance) said they couldn't insure it, and therefore I couldn't get the plates for it. I am going to try to go to a different company because I would really like to get one for the same reasons mentioned on here, it makes you look much more professional even if you are 16, or 61.

DSLND
09-15-2007, 08:18 PM
People around here seem to be impressed, rather than nervous. I'm not the fourteen year old wearing no shirt, basketball shorts, and tennis shoes. Image is a lot in my company. I always have jeans, company t-shirt (tucked in), hat, sun glasses/head phones, and always wear boots. I have found that by showing people the work i have preformed in the past can blow they away. I tell them that i may be higher than a regular guy mowing for money, but the after results are worth it. I keep my equipment running at top preformance, and try to keep it some-what clean. I never show up to a property on Sunday morning, or after 7:00 at night. Because 80% of my work comes from "word of mouth" they already know i am young, ambhitious, and always deliver A+ results. When people ask, "how much of that equipment is your parents?" they are normally blown away when i say "none, i have paid cash for everything." What has been working for me is displaying myself in a professional way, and making my customers excited about hiring me.

-Mitch-

dwlah
09-15-2007, 08:27 PM
IMHO, it's not your age necessarily that people will notice, but the level of your maturity. If you stand behind your work (professionalism), show up and do what you say you will (integrity and dependability), and treat people with respect, I don't see any reason why you can't be successful in the residential market.


Im with plantguys on this one I picked up 2 accounts because "that kid just quit showing up" didnt really want them but they were close to other accounts
I think age may have something to do with it the kids today have a lot going on besides working you have school and all the stuff that goes with that family stuff like vacations/long weekends

topsites
09-15-2007, 08:37 PM
People around here seem to be impressed, rather than nervous. I'm not the fourteen year old wearing no shirt, basketball shorts, and tennis shoes. Image is a lot in my company. I always have jeans, company t-shirt (tucked in), hat, sun glasses/head phones, and always wear boots. I have found that by showing people the work i have preformed in the past can blow they away. I tell them that i may be higher than a regular guy mowing for money, but the after results are worth it. I keep my equipment running at top preformance, and try to keep it some-what clean. I never show up to a property on Sunday morning, or after 7:00 at night. Because 80% of my work comes from "word of mouth" they already know i am young, ambhitious, and always deliver A+ results. When people ask, "how much of that equipment is your parents?" they are normally blown away when i say "none, i have paid cash for everything." What has been working for me is displaying myself in a professional way, and making my customers excited about hiring me.

-Mitch-

That's what it's all about, right there you have goals, ambition, a plan and the means to execute it all in one neat package. You think highly of yourself, you make sure your equipment is at the very least up to the minimum maintenance specifications at all times and you're willing and able to go above and beyond the average, and you do, time and again!

Because that's the thing, average folks can be found a dime a dozen, run of the mill and call the next guy and it's always the same old song and dance, maybe one verse short of cry me a river. Then along comes someone real good, nobody notices at first but over time it does show, hey, you know, this guy does it right always, first time, everytime, his mower never breaks down mid-cut, his equipment always runs good, and that is when word of mouth finally starts to work for you.

So once you realize you can do better than anyone else, I think you got it made. That's my same goal, is to become one of the best solo service providers to some of the most elite clientele in this town, those who not only can afford it but appreciate the extra that is done and also think highly of themselves.

Because I feel so long you always strive to improve and better yourself, in time you should start to notice how the rest always fall short of your work, to the point their best doesn't come close to your worst.

It's a long hard road, but once you're there age matters none, other than a few questions perhaps.
Now that's what I'm talking about!

.........
Other notes: the worst part is having to fight off the riff-raff :laugh:

lifetree
09-15-2007, 10:13 PM
... I started doing everything over the phone, bids are done by phone ...

I've had bad experience doing things over the phone ... my esperience is that it's a good idea to meet and know your customers !!

LawnInOrder
09-15-2007, 10:20 PM
IMHO, it's not your age necessarily that people will notice, but the level of your maturity. If you stand behind your work (professionalism), show up and do what you say you will (integrity and dependability), and treat people with respect, I don't see any reason why you can't be successful in the residential market.

However, if you venture into the commercial side of the industry, age is very much a factor. While I don't know an exact age, I think 25 is a good age- and the automobile industry sets this age as their mature driver age.

Just my two copper pieces.

I totally agree. My business has sky rocketed this year. When i go on an estimate people think i'm 21-25 years old in reality I only turned 18 2 weeks ago. It is all how you act and how you speak in front of people. If you go up to people and have a know it all attitude, you could be 45 or 18 and people won;t hire you. I personally thiunk how you dress is a big factor. When me and my partner go on an estiamte we make sure we coordinate what we are wearing and always wear our company's polo shirts. Wearing a polo short IMO is a big sign or a mature business. just my 2 cents.

DuraCutter
09-15-2007, 11:00 PM
[QUOTE=SangerLawn;1964637]ipsmowing

Again I will make the point that made you start this thread. While you are young with no to very little bills, this would be a great time to charge half as much as a grown company. In all reality you would be profiting about the same because you donít have the same over head as a company with employees and payments. When you see a company making 50-75 dollars an hour while mowing, that is not what they are pocketing. They have shop payments, employees to pay, gas to drive all over the place, where and tare, electricity and so many more (not to mention you probably donít pay taxes on what you make). If you have employees they are 10x harder on equipment then you areÖ it isnít thereís so they donít care about it, therefore more parts, labor, and down time that you donít have.

By charging less you will get more customers, begin to grow, spread your name, show that you are a reliable company, and start to be able to afford insurance and other things needed. Then you can begin to raise your prices as you build a stronger name for your self and able to compete with surrounding companies, not just the Mexicans next door as you put it.

That is a sure fire way to continue the trend, downward....:nono:

Stick to your guns... charge what the others charge, pocket the profit to GROW!!!

DO NOT LOWBALL to grow...that is extremely bad for you. It's hard to raise prices once you're known as a lowballer and with measly profits because it'll cost you more than you might imagine...

Stick to higher prices...

:)

SangerLawn
09-16-2007, 07:45 AM
[QUOTE=SangerLawn;1964637]ipsmowing

Again I will make the point that made you start this thread. While you are young with no to very little bills, this would be a great time to charge half as much as a grown company. In all reality you would be profiting about the same because you donít have the same over head as a company with employees and payments. When you see a company making 50-75 dollars an hour while mowing, that is not what they are pocketing. They have shop payments, employees to pay, gas to drive all over the place, where and tare, electricity and so many more (not to mention you probably donít pay taxes on what you make). If you have employees they are 10x harder on equipment then you areÖ it isnít thereís so they donít care about it, therefore more parts, labor, and down time that you donít have.

By charging less you will get more customers, begin to grow, spread your name, show that you are a reliable company, and start to be able to afford insurance and other things needed. Then you can begin to raise your prices as you build a stronger name for your self and able to compete with surrounding companies, not just the Mexicans next door as you put it.

That is a sure fire way to continue the trend, downward....:nono:

Stick to your guns... charge what the others charge, pocket the profit to GROW!!!

DO NOT LOWBALL to grow...that is extremely bad for you. It's hard to raise prices once you're known as a lowballer and with measly profits because it'll cost you more than you might imagine...

Stick to higher prices...

:)

he is having problems getting people to let him mow the lawn. from another thread sevral things were brought up that were against him. because if these things is why it was sugested to lowball until he has what he needs to suceed

pj550v12
09-18-2007, 01:28 AM
More important than maturity (however many would see as the same thing) is profesionalism, even a mature person can be unprofesional. Age means nothing, as long as you are profesional

jbannick18
09-18-2007, 01:58 AM
regardless of age as long as you do a good job i don't think you should charge half of what other companies do, I know i don't but I make sure to do a good job. I'm not taking steps to grow. I just ordered shirts, fictious name, occupational license, insurance ^^

verant
10-01-2007, 11:02 PM
dude, i can totally relate to you, i started when i was 16. I too and i'm still dealing with getting work done around school, activities and all. i'm a freshman in college now and im going home on the weekends to get my jobs done. i did 17 one weekend, im a one man crew with a 54" kubota Zero turn. When you get a trailer get at least a 12'. i started out with a residential mower and a 10' trailer, and a jeep. Now i have the zero turn, 12' trailer BP blower, trimmer, and a F150. you gotta have commercial grade equipment to compete and get things done.
Age-my customers were impressed by my age and starting my own business. I think it's only a bigger deal for big commercial jobs. Doing estimates over the phone is only good if you've already seen the property. Be personable and professional w/ clients and you'll be fine. Write back dude

advantage landscaping
10-01-2007, 11:39 PM
verant - Well right now things are looking up... I picked up another client and have 4 now. I think thats a decent starting point for now, but next year I am going to really try to push to expand. Maybe 14+ properties?

What exactly did you do to get business? How did you expand using marketing?

advantage landscaping
10-01-2007, 11:42 PM
And of course I had problems getting customers. 95% of people who wanted their lawns done were already having them done by the time I started advertising in July. I was surprised I got what I did actually! But yea low-ballings not the answer to me...

verant
10-02-2007, 01:34 AM
Yeah, don't short change yourself. Don't get you prices too low, especially if you have expensive commercial equip. Do you have that? I was up to 25 customers in June this summer. I was pretty busy, being that there wasn't a drought and in school and tennis - The drought starts in july here in MN, which sucks. Get adds in the classifieds in April through June. and then again in september for fall clean up ads. Put flyers and business cards in bulletin boards around town. Word of mouth is good - so do good work. Put a logo on your truck window. Then you look commercial and peple know who you are. Thoughts....?

topsites
10-02-2007, 03:10 AM
That's right, of course I'm going to lowball someone who has no experience in these matters... Unfortunately since I don't know the next person from Adam I just lowball everybody and see who falls for it, now if it makes you feel any better at least 9 out of 10 customers do it to me, too.

So that's just how it works, I avoid most of my headaches by cherry picking.
Age a factor?
Heck I'm 40 how do you think that crap makes me feel?
But you can't be afraid of them, you can't let it get to you, it's just a numbers game.
Quote the price, yes or no, and be ready to walk.
And you will likely walk away more times than not, at least I do.

Common Ground
10-02-2007, 03:31 AM
just bust your arse and get into what u do. age is not a factor:weightlifter:

Roger
10-02-2007, 07:43 AM
More important than maturity (however many would see as the same thing) is profesionalism, even a mature person can be unprofesional. Age means nothing, as long as you are profesional

I disagree with this assessment. Here is this word again, "professional," or "professionalism," used often in this thread, without definition. In other threads, the word has been used often, and when asked for a definition, nobody has a good answer.

Several other posts discuss image, and also bring "professionalism" into the mix. I don't bring any of this to the table, but rather bring maturity to the table. I always have much more work than I can handle. Nobody questions my lack of uniforms, or lack of a lettered truck. I get the work because they have seen my work elsewhere, and trust that I will show up to do the work. Many have had bad experiences with others who can't even show up on a regular basis.

I also have feedback the residential customers "don't want a kid on their property." Clearly, they are making a decision regarding those they want working around their house. The areas I work are quite safe, but nevertheless, house break-ins, theft, etc. happen from time to time. The older folks are keen on these events, and have more confidence when an older person is working on their property (maybe misguided confidence, but that is their perception).

There are too many threads on LS that discuss customer problems, adversarial relationships, etc. Customers are characterized as the enemy, as the one "out to get them," the one they want to "do battle with." For me, customers are the ones who give me an opportunity to work and are the ones who pay money for my efforts. The customer is the best part of the business because they create the cash flow.

Daddy Joes Lawn Service
10-02-2007, 09:31 AM
I showed up at a lady's house wearing pants,company shrit tuck in looking sharp. she say's i don't think i'll be able to afford you what is your price i told her i thought she was going to fall over! You dress like this all the time yes mam very nice thank you. couldn't feel better about this!!

advantage landscaping
10-02-2007, 12:49 PM
I think that it's funny that all of us young guys claim to look like we are older (I know for a fact that most of us do) Is that some sort of requirement for getting into the business? haha it seems like it...

I think "professionalism" is important, to a point maybe. At the end of the day I don't think that the majority of people care that much, BUT... It does depend on who you are looking to quote. If I were in a country-club like setting I would make sure to go with looking nice, but most people that do this and do it well shouldn't wear a polo shirt everyday. Unless you are sitting on the mower all day (which in my opinion isn't really getting into it) you should be DIRTY and have grass all over you. Not to say thats how you should approach a customer, but someone who shows up looking like a business exectutive may give someone the wrong approach of your business. It's nice to look good, but at the end of the day we are landscapers and dobody expects us to look tidy every moment of our lives! (thank god) It's always nice to look good but I don't think people care as much as we calim that they do.

verant - this year has been aweful. Usually we can get through June into July with enough rain, but it really depends on the temps around here. If we get a really hot summer without much rain (like this past one) then the grass takes through the fall to recover. This year we did not water our backyard and it has been burned dead for months. Once the grass dies I don't care who you are crabgrass is going to become your new best friend. And by that time its not really worth dealing with. Our front yard survived though because it gets shade over 50% of the day. A little watering and its fine.

For most of my customers though, the lawns have really been rebuilding the past two weeks. We got some rain the last two weeks and with some fertilizer that has got them growing again. I still try to cut them every week though... Once you get into 10-day cuts its too much of a pain in the ***!!

Common Ground
10-02-2007, 03:57 PM
If you get into what u do and care about doing it right it will show. Too much emphasis on "professionalism" here in this thread. Professionalism can mean many many things. just get into what u do, be happy, and like your work. It will show. All this crap about polo shirts and clean cut hair is garbage. I dont think people give a flying hoot about what clothes your wearing or if you wear stuble and long hair. If you build a good reputation based on dependability and good work your shirt, or lack of shirt(thats shirtless) does not matter a bit. All of you wraped up so tight in your polos maybe should loosed up a bit. It will not matter in the end if your a good landscaper. thats My two cents and im am doing wonderfully at this point. SHIRTLESS TATOO'D And all. DONT GET CAUGHT UP IN THE APPEARENCE TRAP Its BS. Just be mature and able to talk with people as a buisiness minded person. Most civil people do not care about what u dress or look like. :hammerhead:

Daddy Joes Lawn Service
10-02-2007, 04:29 PM
If you get into what u do and care about doing it right it will show. Too much emphasis on "professionalism" here in this thread. Professionalism can mean many many things. just get into what u do, be happy, and like your work. It will show. All this crap about polo shirts and clean cut hair is garbage. I dont think people give a flying hoot about what clothes your wearing or if you wear stuble and long hair. If you build a good reputation based on dependability and good work your shirt, or lack of shirt(thats shirtless) does not matter a bit. All of you wraped up so tight in your polos maybe should loosed up a bit. It will not matter in the end if your a good landscaper. thats My two cents and im am doing wonderfully at this point. SHIRTLESS TATOO'D And all. DONT GET CAUGHT UP IN THE APPEARENCE TRAP Its BS. Just be mature and able to talk with people as a buisiness minded person. Most civil people do not care about what u dress or look like. :hammerhead:



If you came and gave me an estimate wearing shirtless shrits flipflops and looking like you don't care. I would shut the door! Your good reputation is also based on your clothes and your good work.. Go find a another job and see what happens!

davis45
10-02-2007, 04:57 PM
Long time reader first time poster to this sight.

There is a difference in what some of us are talking about. If your just going to give an estimate, sure, you should look descent but still not like you work in an office. Also, there is no need to be dressed in a polo while out working in the yard.

My business shirts are regular T-shirts with a front pocket. Alot of my work jeans have patches in them. These are what i give estimates in and also what i work in. Let me tell you, i am not hurting for business.

The more important thing is to have a professional looking truck/trailer, IMO. Equipment clean, and trailer organized, an enclosed trailer is a plus side also.

Common Ground, were on the same page here. Half the time when i'm working i am shirtless and my back is tattoo'd. Alot of the older customers think its neat and ask me questions about it.

PROCUT1
10-02-2007, 11:37 PM
Forget the lowballing. Thats rediculous.

I had 100 homes at age 18 and 60 or so through highschool.

It can be done. Just keep working an area. People will get to know you. Every job you do make sure to meet the neighbors.

People love to see a "kid" out hustling work.

It doesnt matter what equipment you own. I spent years riding around my neighborhood on a lawn tractor working. During that time, I pissed off quite a few "established" guys. I accomplished more before I turned 18 then most of those guys did in 20 years.

Just keep at it and dont get discouraged.

Age is a factor. But once you get a reputation, you can overcome that easily.

topsites
10-03-2007, 12:27 AM
As for age being a factor, I tell you this much, age helps.
It's just one of those things to look forward to as we all get older.
You wait until you get to be 40, if life wasn't easier as we got older, might as well go hang myself :laugh:

But anytime during all of it, it boils down to self-esteem and how far you going to let them push you.
It took years for me before I got sick and tired of being sick and tired, then after I got very angry very many times, things slowly started to change, so as much as age it's also change, and this change comes from within, just give it time.

Long time reader first time poster to this sight.

There is a difference in what some of us are talking about. If your just going to give an estimate, sure, you should look descent but still not like you work in an office. Also, there is no need to be dressed in a polo while out working in the yard.

My business shirts are regular T-shirts with a front pocket. Alot of my work jeans have patches in them. These are what i give estimates in and also what i work in. Let me tell you, i am not hurting for business.

The more important thing is to have a professional looking truck/trailer, IMO. Equipment clean, and trailer organized, an enclosed trailer is a plus side also.

Common Ground, were on the same page here. Half the time when i'm working i am shirtless and my back is tattoo'd. Alot of the older customers think its neat and ask me questions about it.

Man I been trying to tell them that for years :laugh:

It's all good, I guess to each their own but I worked shirtless up until this year... It seems with the higher class customer, you know, move up in the world, but more than anything just be yourself, it's still T-shirt and jeans for me.

I think that's where the guys get messed up, trying to fit in or trying to look a certain way...
I keep saying it, just be yourself, that's where you want to be anyhow.

And if the money's aggravating, yeah, you know, I think we should all wear some hip boots in them there 'how much you make this year' threads... What can I say, I've worked hard and long to get where I am and still I'm nowhere close to where the top braggers are, and if they're not bragging then there's something they're not telling, because it ain't all that in this world, let us dream a little and all that I guess, but come on back down to earth when you're out there working.

Because to me nothing is worse than faking it, that backfires so good because they just see weakness written all over you, a fake is a defense mechanism and I know you do what you have to do but be yourself, who cares anyhow?

Common Ground
10-03-2007, 03:46 PM
If you came and gave me an estimate wearing shirtless shrits flipflops and looking like you don't care. I would shut the door! Your good reputation is also based on your clothes and your good work.. Go find a another job and see what happens!


Slam that door buddy!!! There is most def a huge market of people who appreciate a more relaxed, be yourself, approach to yard service. Im getting plenty clients quickly. I wear steel toe boots, camo pants too, no flipflops here dude. I dont think reputation in yard service has nothing to do with what u wear. I mean within reason. DONT WEAR FLIPFLOPS!! DUH. I have had "other" jobs too buddy. Of course i am dressed somewhat when bartending but thats a totaly different ball game then yard service. Think about it dude. Anyway its no matter what u think Im getting buisiness and many compliments, and qeustions about my tattoos. People are very currious about them and not one has requested that i wear a shirt when working. I have been wearing one for an estimate but just out of chance. Maybe ill go shirtless next estimate and let u know how it goes. Dunno. As i said just be mature and with a friendly buisiness like attitude. its No matter what u are wearing, as long as its not offensive. I think that goes without saying tho. If your offended by me mowing without a shirt on then i dont need your buisiness. DONT CUT YOURSELFS SHORT!! this is the biggest obstacle in my opinion. Make sure your honing your estimate skills to match the local market. :laugh:

Daddy Joes Lawn Service
10-03-2007, 05:08 PM
Slam that door buddy!!! There is most def a huge market of people who appreciate a more relaxed, be yourself, approach to yard service. Im getting plenty clients quickly. I wear steel toe boots, camo pants too, no flipflops here dude. I dont think reputation in yard service has nothing to do with what u wear. I mean within reason. DONT WEAR FLIPFLOPS!! DUH. I have had "other" jobs too buddy. Of course i am dressed somewhat when bartending but thats a totaly different ball game then yard service. Think about it dude. Anyway its no matter what u think Im getting buisiness and many compliments, and qeustions about my tattoos. People are very currious about them and not one has requested that i wear a shirt when working. I have been wearing one for an estimate but just out of chance. Maybe ill go shirtless next estimate and let u know how it goes. Dunno. As i said just be mature and with a friendly buisiness like attitude. its No matter what u are wearing, as long as its not offensive. I think that goes without saying tho. If your offended by me mowing without a shirt on then i dont need your buisiness. DONT CUT YOURSELFS SHORT!! this is the biggest obstacle in my opinion. Make sure your honing your estimate skills to match the local market. :laugh:

One reason i said shritless and wearing flip flops is there is a person in an area i seen cutting grass and his partner weed eating shrit less and wearing filpflops doing lawn service!! NO wonder insurance is high!!

MachoWorker
01-22-2008, 03:23 PM
What's wrong when a well build landscaper works shirtless? NOTHING! And you can be sure, the customers (esp. the Ladies) like it! They pay for manual laboer, so they expect a muscular guy is doing the hard work. And of course they want to see that he is really working hard with his muscles, that he is sweaty.

I disagree to shorts too, but yeans or cameos are O.K.

I also work shirtless as often as I can!

I have a good body, I am proud about my body, so why shall I wear a shirt!

It looks better, it feel better.

It's a laboeres outfit!:weightlifter: