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lawn jockey
09-19-2001, 09:24 PM
HELLO EVERYONE JUST A ? iM JUST STARTING OUT i HAVE ALOT OF CLIENTS ALREADY LINED UP FOR NEXT SEASON! JUST WHAT DO I NEED TO HAVE A LAWYER DO I KNOW ABOUT THE DBA AND THE CO. NAME AND ALL, BUT DO YOU GUYS HAVE THEM WRITE YOUR CONTRACTS AND ALL THE OTHER STUFF UP? AND HOW ABOUT AND APPROX. $ THANKYOU CORY:confused:

1MajorTom
09-19-2001, 09:34 PM
Hello Cory,

Welcome to Lawnsite. Please remember to not use all Caps. You will find that you will get more responses to your questions, because it makes it much easier for the members to read.

Don't forget while you are waiting for some responses, use the search button at the top of the page. It will help you out to answer a lot of your questions.

Guido
09-20-2001, 02:23 AM
Doing the hard work yourself!

A lot of people tell a lawyer to write them a contract for this or that purpose, and write me a letter for this, and how's that, etc.

Well with a MILLION resources on the net including this forum and some free legal advise forum's I've seen you should be able to put togehter a solid legal binding contract and good business letter's, etc yourself. Do what you can on your own, and THEN bring it to your lawyer for a look.

This way, he's not wasting his time (and your money , lots of it!) doing typing and writing BS customer letters, etc. You can do that for a lot less then he charges right?

Just my view on the deal, lets see what some others say, shall we?

kris
10-02-2001, 08:21 PM
I agree David...

We started this division almost 2 years ago now...this is what I did.

I went to a differant city ( about 3 hours south ) and met with a fellow maintenance contractor. This is a big company that does about 5 million gross a year in just cutting and snow clearing. I spent the day with the owner...sat in on one of there meetings..had lunch ..toured there shop...toured some job sites, and also came away with copys of there contracts among other things. I then modified it to fit our needs.
My sole purpose was not to get a contract copy ..in fact..it just came up in the visit... I was mainly interested in how a company this size operates and was willing to "take in" whatever they had to offer. It was a great day!

Sorry for rambling... short answer is no...you don't need a lawyer.

Martino
10-04-2001, 10:19 AM
Cory:

This is my .02. I would not even consider going into business without the aid of an attorney. With all of the issues that you will have to face in starting and maintaining your business (corporation/partnership/sole proprietorship, liability, valid contracts, employee/employment issues, etc.), you would be absolutely defenseless if a legal issue were to occur. Can Guido go back to the internet for accountability if something arises? Maybe Kris will drive 3 hours again to tell the company that he "borrowed" the contracts from that he has a legal problem with them. With an attorney guiding you, there is accountability every step along the way. If others have gone without an attorney with no problems, so be it. But I can tell you that it would be WAY too risky to my livelihood to even consider it. Anything worth doing is worth doing right, in my opinion.

bruces
10-04-2001, 12:19 PM
Consult a lawyer. I agree with some of the other posts, you can do a lot of the work yourself, come up with ideas for contracts, etc. from Lawnsite and other sources you might be able to find.

Refine them to your needs as much as you can, then let an attorney review them. You can do the grunt work and pay the attorney for legal advice, not word processing.

Also, by establishing a relationship with an attorney early on, you will have a source to turn to if you should need legal advice in the normal course of your business for any reason.

Also, talk to your tax advisor early. I'm a CPA and one of the saddest situations we see is the person who has gone in business for themselves, been fairly successful, and at the end of the year has an unexpected tax bill and no money left.

Also you can get guidance from the tax advisor and and attorney as to best form of business (LLC, corp, scorp, etc.) They all have stong points that are a best fit for a particular situation.

If you talk to someone early, they can advise you as to record keeping, software to use (I and a lot of others on here like Quickbooks), and general tax and business consultation.

Bottom line is you might not need a lot of legal and tax advice on a regular basis, but in my opinion it is better to spend a little money now and get started right than save $500 or $1000 and find out that your contracts might not be valid or you tax situation is out of control.

gogetter
10-04-2001, 03:36 PM
Originally posted by Martino
Can Guido go back to the internet for accountability if something arises?. With an attorney guiding you, there is accountability every step along the way

Martino, re-read Guido's post. He did say to have an attorney go over whatever you come up with. He's just saying to do some of the footwork yourself to perhaps keep costs down and to maybe have a better understanding of it all because you were more involved as opposed to just calling a lawyer and having him make something up for you.

BTW Kris, I'm curious how you went about hooking uo with this other contractor? Was it someone you already knew, a friend?
I'd love to spend a day with a larger LCO and see how they go about thier daily business. I think it would be very informative.
Later.

kris
10-04-2001, 08:13 PM
Originally posted by gogetter



BTW Kris, I'm curious how you went about hooking uo with this other contractor? Was it someone you already knew, a friend?
I'd love to spend a day with a larger LCO and see how they go about thier daily business. I think it would be very informative.
Later.

Gogetter..

It was a friend of a friends... If I where you I would look out of town and simply phone them... most guys would not have a problem with it.... We have done the same for many who want to shadow for a day.

Martino,

Not much chance of me going back to the company that let me have a look at there contract... We use lawyers for many things but to tell you the truth , anyone stiffing us for a months worth of maintenance would probably get away with it...no possible way that it would be worth lawyers fees and court costs... but hey..i agree with your post.

Guido
10-04-2001, 08:19 PM
Originally posted by gogetter


Martino, re-read Guido's post. He did say to have an attorney go over whatever you come up with. He's just saying to do some of the footwork yourself to perhaps keep costs down and to maybe have a better understanding of it all because you were more involved as opposed to just calling a lawyer and having him make something up for you.



I was going to do exactly what you did when I read the post and then scrolled down and saw I didn't have to. I'm glad someone knows how to read! ;)