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View Full Version : Poor design? Aliens?


hoskm01
09-28-2007, 04:01 PM
A neighborhood school nearby, check out the "field".

Give me your opinion of the problem. Not a job im looking at, just an interesting sight from above.




http://www.lawnlogistics.com/grass%20circles.jpg







Good example of why you space head to head. Map says spacing is 55ft from center to center of each circle.

Purp, I know this would never happen at one of your sites.

Mike Leary
09-28-2007, 05:27 PM
Triangle non-spacing rears it's ugly head..again. Is it my monitor, or
did someone forget to turn it on?:hammerhead:

FIMCO-MEISTER
09-28-2007, 08:54 PM
Great Great Pic.

hoskm01
09-28-2007, 09:45 PM
I forget, who has the peeve on pic size in here? Someone with Dial up no less, I'm sure.

FIMCO-MEISTER
09-28-2007, 09:53 PM
I forget, who has the peeve on pic size in here? Someone with Dial up no less, I'm sure.

Boots Wet Boots

hoskm01
09-28-2007, 09:55 PM
Right, right... This ones for you Boots.

PurpHaze
09-29-2007, 01:25 AM
A neighborhood school nearby, check out the "field".

Give me your opinion of the problem. Not a job im looking at, just an interesting sight from above.

Hard telling what it was subjected to without actually being on the ground and seeing it firsthand. Could be a combination of problems. We get a lot of our football practice fields that show shoddiness more from excessive use than from any other problem.

Good example of why you space head to head. Map says spacing is 55ft from center to center of each circle.

Maybe the 55' is/was head-to-head spacing and something's gone wrong. We have some fields with 67' spacings that are crap now but I imagine when they were first installed everything was OK. However, as pump efficiencies or other water sources decline... who knows?

Purp, I know this would never happen at one of your sites.

Not by me as I always include buffers in the designs. However, I know I have to check out a few things when I go back to work on light duty Monday that aren't properly working. Seems I can put systems in and then someone else comes along, uses the same sprinkler heads and there's nothing but problems. I may spend a lot of time on mysteries of this nature but I'm usually not quick to judge. I always want as much info as I can get and often it's a combination of problems that cause the overall shoddiness.

Wet_Boots
09-29-2007, 07:59 AM
Right, right... This ones for you Boots.My compliments to the image editing - honking big photo, and less than 90KB file size.

As to the 55 foot spacing, that could have been 'textbook triangular' back in the day, and it could cover effectively, with impacts spraying 40 feet.

Mjtrole
09-29-2007, 10:28 AM
Soccer fields usually use 60ft spacing for heads, maybe a supply problem or the pump has lost a leg and isn't running full speed.

hoskm01
09-29-2007, 11:11 AM
My compliments to the image editing - honking big photo, and less than 90KB file size.

As to the 55 foot spacing, that could have been 'textbook triangular' back in the day, and it could cover effectively, with impacts spraying 40 feet.



Theres no doubt that 55' is a doable distance, done properly. You can do 115 feet with certain heads and the right pressure/flow. But...

A)This school is maybe in its third year, brand new neighborhood etc...
B) Schools dont pump, dont have pumps, cant afford pumps around here. Its city supply on maybe a 2" line from the main to the school if youre lucky.
C) They've got some cheap rotor in the ground, cant tell what they are, didnt want to get arrested for jumpin the fence. The throw/pattern already looks like crap.

I drove by yesterday to see it first hand. By chance, a zone was running. Each head sprays about 2-6 feet over the farthest reach of the next head, giving you the green honeycomb pattern. Obviously not enough water to begin with, but horrible coverage to boot.

If I didnt know any better, I would solicit them to take on a fix. But schools dont have any money here, and dont sub out landscaping/irrigation. Purp, can you call in a favor or possibly see if they can get somebody out there besides the janitor?

PurpHaze
09-29-2007, 12:23 PM
Its city supply on maybe a 2" line from the main to the school if youre lucky.

Can't run very many field rotars off a 2" supply with maximum of around 55 GPM for zone use. Couple this with the possibility that there may be another interior controller running at the same time and it's a lost cause from the very beginning.

Our new schools have 4" domestic supplies and then a booster pump on the field zones. But even with this you really can't run more than one field zone (our field zones are typically 100-120 GPM) at a time or you start to exceed the 200 GPM of the 4" supply line. I've been pushing for 6" mains on field sections but a monetary compromise has to be made somewhere.

Another factor (IF everything else is hunky dory) would be the soil. Desert areas like you and us need LOTS of water to keep a field up and running. We have some of our sandier sites needing six days per week watering just to keep things looking green.

Kiril
09-29-2007, 12:25 PM
We have some of our sandier sites needing six days per week watering just to keep things looking green.

:cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:

PurpHaze
09-29-2007, 12:31 PM
Soccer fields usually use 60ft spacing for heads, maybe a supply problem or the pump has lost a leg and isn't running full speed.

This just would not be an accurate statement. You COULD do an entire soccer field with spray pop-ups at 15' spacings but you'd have a gazillion of them out there. Spacings is more dependent on zone boundaries and sprinkler head used which is directly related to available GPM/PSI. :)

One football/soccer field I designed had a looped 3" main line and Hunter I-25s which fit the overall boundaries better than I-40s (would have had to use the smallest nozzles and even then I'd be throwing too much water on all-weather track) or I-20s (would take way to many to accomplish the job).

On another complex I designed using a 6" looped main line with I-40s and large nozzles because the pieces of the puzzle fit together better.

PurpHaze
09-29-2007, 12:33 PM
:cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:

I've suggested for years turning off non-essential field areas during the summer.

Kiril
09-29-2007, 12:38 PM
I've suggested for years turning off non-essential field areas during the summer.

Brown is beautiful. :)

PurpHaze
09-29-2007, 12:39 PM
As to the 55 foot spacing, that could have been 'textbook triangular' back in the day, and it could cover effectively, with impacts spraying 40 feet.

Many old QCV systems are triangulated. The problem is getting someone to religiously set/move the impacts so all areas get decent watering over a given period of time.

Then you have to educate the setter/mover to break the habit of setting all the QCVs in a straight line since this usually overtaxes the pipe sizings put in and you'll see a steady decline in performance as the water gets to the end of the QC line. Those that "block water" get more efficiency out of their resources.

Designers also need to take center vs. end feed into account when designing new field zones.

PurpHaze
09-29-2007, 12:42 PM
Brown is beautiful. :)

But get this... The city uses the schools' acreage to establish its "park acreage" and generate maintenance monies on a statewide allocation basis but none of that money is available to school districts to help defray the cost of "public recreational spaces" upkeep.

Kiril
09-29-2007, 12:45 PM
But get this... The city uses the schools' acreage to establish its "park acreage" and generate maintenance monies on a statewide allocation basis but none of that money is available to school districts to help defray the cost of "public recreational spaces" upkeep.

That is just wrong. :hammerhead: Not to mention many of the schools fields are most likely not available for public use.

PurpHaze
09-29-2007, 01:07 PM
That is just wrong. :hammerhead: Not to mention many of the schools fields are most likely not available for public use.

In theory... the public needs a Facility Use Permit to use school properties and school functions always have priority. Then... there are some facilities, such as the main stadiums' fields, varsity baseball fields, etc. that are off limits except under special permit.

Rotor_Tool
09-29-2007, 01:20 PM
A neighborhood school nearby, check out the "field".

Give me your opinion of the problem. Not a job im looking at, just an interesting sight from above.




http://www.lawnlogistics.com/grass%20circles.jpg







Good example of why you space head to head. Map says spacing is 55ft from center to center of each circle.

Purp, I know this would never happen at one of your sites.

Classic "ring around the rotor". Caused by:

1. Poor pressure
2. Poor coverage
3. Terrible nozzle design - inherent to cheap rotors
4. Spacing rotors at their max. distance :nono:

Mike Leary
09-29-2007, 05:36 PM
I'll be down there in late October, I consult for the Wickenberg School
District..If you want to PM me your # or contact person, I'd be glad
to take a look.

turfnh2oman
09-30-2007, 10:26 AM
There's nothing wrong with triangluar spacing / design. I use it all the time.

Pic is evident of a low pressure situation, look at the pattern !!!!!!!

Heavy on the outside, light on the inside. Donut rings.

Irri. 101 here boys !

Mike Leary
09-30-2007, 06:58 PM
There's nothing wrong with triangluar spacing / design. I use it all the time.

Pic is evident of a low pressure situation, look at the pattern !!!!!!!

Heavy on the outside, light on the inside. Donut rings.

Irri. 101 here boys !

Duh post......101:hammerhead: