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View Full Version : 8 guage wire stripper?


Lite4
10-02-2007, 12:23 AM
Anybody out there have a good wire stripper for 8 guage that won't cut wires? I have a great stripper for 10 and under, but I am always left to use my cable cutter to delicately cut the outside shielding. I am just looking for something faster.

bmwsmity
10-02-2007, 11:42 AM
I use an "auto stripper" that simultaneously cuts & strips the wire that does go down to 8ga. However, you can't go very fast with it or it will cut into the wire.

I can't remember the brand (sorry), but it has blue handles and I got it at Home Depot. DO NOT get the GB auto stripper with red handles...it isn't built as beefy and will quickly bind up and stop working....mine lasted about 2 months.

Hope this helps some. I know my regular Klein strippers only go down to 10ga.

Lite4
10-02-2007, 01:44 PM
I use the blue handled ones now, but they always cut the wire on the 8. There has got to be something better out there.

JoeyD
10-02-2007, 02:16 PM
I use my teeth

ERRRRRRRRR

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
10-02-2007, 04:20 PM
These Irwin Tools automatic wire strippers are the best I have ever used. They pretty much NEVER cut a strand and are fast fast fast. I usually go through two per year per installer but at about $18 each that is no big deal. The time and hassle they save is remarkable.

http://www.irwin.com/irwin/consumer/jhtml/detail.jhtml?prodId=IrwinProd150031

Not sure how they will handle 8 ga. wire mind you.... When ever I need to use 8 ga I just double up two 12 ga runs. It is much cheaper per foot to do so (more convenient too as you dont have to stock two different wire sizes) and actually gives you something closer to 6 ga specs. Just be careful to match up your cables so as to not create a short.

Lite4
10-02-2007, 06:09 PM
Joey, Im sure your dentist will love you for that.

James, Great tip on the multiple wires. don't ask me why I never thought of that. Old habits are hard to break I guess.

JoeyD
10-02-2007, 06:13 PM
Whats a Dentist?

olyman
10-02-2007, 09:04 PM
go talk to your friendly lineman---they have tools that "screw" onto diff wire sizes---and when it bottoms out--it cuts around the sheating--then you pull it off--slick---

Chris J
10-02-2007, 09:34 PM
Now why didn't I think of that. Good idea, thanks!

David Gretzmier
10-03-2007, 12:56 AM
James, that's frigging brilliant. I never thought of that. labeling would be important.

I think klein makes a pair of strippers just for 8 guage standed and it will also work on 10 guage solid. It looks like a small cable cutter but it leaves the wire intact.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
10-03-2007, 09:20 AM
James, that's frigging brilliant. I never thought of that. labeling would be important.


Actually, when doubling up a 12 Ga run, you dont really have to worry about labelling.... All of the wire I have seen has some identifying method on the jacket. Be it printing or jacket shape, each side of the cable is somewhat different. So, you just align like sides of each 12 Ga run and you will not have any problems.

This introduces some good habits too... if you are using a lot of "doubles" as I call them, it is good practise to adopt a standard rule of always aligning your wires at every connection. Then it just becomes habit and you dont introduce any shorts.

I predict a dip in the demand for 8 ga. wire very soon!

Have a great day.

Landscape Illuminating
10-03-2007, 07:56 PM
James, you do realized that the NEC requires conductors installed in parallel to be 1/0 or larger, don't you? You may not fall under the same set of regulations in CA, but here in the states this is the requirement. Good day!

-LI

Chris J
10-03-2007, 08:34 PM
I don't understand 1/0. What is this, wire size?

Landscape Illuminating
10-03-2007, 08:52 PM
Chris,

1/0 (pronounced one ought) is one size larger than #1. It is a good size wire....used primarily for large loads and services. Have a look at this chart for a better understanding. Hope this helps.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_wire_gauge

-LI

bmwsmity
10-03-2007, 09:11 PM
Hmmm...that's odd. Do you have a cross-reference to the NEC code that is specific to this?

I can't see how a 1/0 wire would ever be necessary for a low voltage application. Thats like 8 times larger than 8ga!

Landscape Illuminating
10-03-2007, 09:14 PM
I believe this can be found in 310.4 of the NEC. This has nothing to do with voltage. This is for installing conductors in parallel.

-LI

Chris J
10-03-2007, 10:01 PM
Thanks for the info LI. I remember someone saying something about running wires in parallel was a no no in a thread a while back, but I didn't want to enter into this thread unarmed with good information and educated responses to the topic. I'll let you guys hash this out.
Thanks again.

bmwsmity
10-03-2007, 10:50 PM
Interesting. Glad this isn't something I ever do!

Thanks for the input LI!

NightScenes
10-03-2007, 11:14 PM
We've actually covered this before on here. "Doubling up" is a BIG no no.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
10-04-2007, 12:42 AM
I certainly have never heard of this being a problem and honestly never even thought that doubling up a wire run (parallel wire run) in an extra low voltage circuit could be unsafe or dangerous.

Does anyone know exactly why this is such a "big no no". Other then connecting things wrong and causing a dead short (which immediately blows the secondary side protection be it a fuse or breaker) what is the risk?

Does anyone have the verbatim text of the NEC that covers this issue and if so could you post it here? I would like to read it.

Any and all insight, knowledge and experience would be greatly appreciated. I am always looking to learn more.

pete scalia
10-04-2007, 02:22 AM
As long as polarity is maintained there is nothing wrong or dangerous about "doubling up" cable runs for low voltage lighting. All your doing is effectively increasing the gauge of your power cable. Instead of being inside 1 jacket it's inside 2 seperate ones. Do maintain polarity or you'll create a dead short.

Pro-Scapes
10-04-2007, 09:31 AM
These Irwin Tools automatic wire strippers are the best I have ever used. They pretty much NEVER cut a strand and are fast fast fast. I usually go through two per year per installer but at about $18 each that is no big deal. The time and hassle they save is remarkable.

http://www.irwin.com/irwin/consumer/jhtml/detail.jhtml?prodId=IrwinProd150031

Not sure how they will handle 8 ga. wire mind you.... When ever I need to use 8 ga I just double up two 12 ga runs. It is much cheaper per foot to do so (more convenient too as you dont have to stock two different wire sizes) and actually gives you something closer to 6 ga specs. Just be careful to match up your cables so as to not create a short.


I use strippers i found at lowes... they are not auto strips but they handle 8ga. Rarley do i need it.

On james suggestion on using 2 runs of 12ga you CANNOT join these to form a single run. They must be seperated. NEC forbids us from running conductors this small in parralle. I am not sure what canadian specs are but I rememeber doing this as per CASTS recomendation and then found out I was in violation... Case was I ran 2 strips of 10ga out to 6 lights. All was fine I watched my polarity but when I found out I was in violation I returned to the job and seperated it to make 2 smaller hubs.

James it right it is cheaper to run multiple strands of lower ga but if you do them just split the load dont tie them together at the load end of the cable

Pro-Scapes
10-04-2007, 09:31 AM
As long as polarity is maintained there is nothing wrong or dangerous about "doubling up" cable runs for low voltage lighting. All your doing is effectively increasing the gauge of your power cable. Instead of being inside 1 jacket it's inside 2 seperate ones. Do maintain polarity or you'll create a dead short.

This is against NEC code

We've actually covered this before on here. "Doubling up" is a BIG no no.

sorry i replied to the thread before i read it all. All this came up before because I was the one to double up. Protect your liability by following the rules. Yes its PROBABLY safe but the code is there for a reason. I am sure you could do it with zero probs but what happens if there is a fire and the inspector finds your system in violation of NEC ?

JoeyD
10-04-2007, 10:46 AM
From what I have gathered on this subject is that it is not good to pile all of those small strands into one connection.

David Gretzmier
10-04-2007, 11:42 AM
man, I am so sad, I thought this idea was brilliant, was ready to incorporate it into the next need for 8 guage, heck even 10 guage, and now it is against code. I try to follow it, it's there for a reason. dang.