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Indiana Outdoor Lighting
10-02-2007, 08:13 PM
My buddy with a sign shop told me that the local TruGreen/Chemlawn has ordered signs to promote landscape lighting. I believe that Indianapolis will be a test market for the new product line.

Has anyone heard about this? What product will they carry, etc?

I think that a strong promotional effort by TruGreen may be good for all of us.

Chris J
10-02-2007, 08:32 PM
Jeez, you had to go and ruin my night. Another big time organization is branching off into the lighting biz? Great!
No, I don't think this will be a good thing because this is going to be just another example of big corporations that pay minimum wages to their employees to install sub-standard lighting systems. This is right up there with Malibu offering low voltage lighting equipment right out of the big box stores that is low caliber, low cost, and gives the true professional (and the industry in general) a very bad name. Yes, because of the size of their company, they will gain a great market share of the business around here. That is very sad because it means more confusion for the consumer, and a harder sale for guys like us.

pete scalia
10-02-2007, 09:21 PM
when your good you aren't scared of anyone or anything coming into your marketplace.

Chris J
10-02-2007, 09:34 PM
Pete, shut up and check your PM.

Lite4
10-02-2007, 10:50 PM
Hey Chris,
Trugreen will have their own line of lights, not only will they light your grass but they will have a built in pop up emmiter to fertilize your yard from the same fixture. This will eliminate the need for a service call later to fertilize. HMMMM, I might be on to something.

Chris J
10-02-2007, 11:29 PM
Yeah, the same valve will irrigate, illuminate, and fertilize your lawn; all from the same pop-up nozzle! This is the kind of crap I'm talking about. Big companies trying to inovate new ways to streamline the process and increase their profits. They will make it sound really inovative and cutting edge, but in the end I will be the only one that answers the freakin phone when it comes time to service the stupid stuff. No thanks, I have enough of that type of junk in my territory already.

David Gretzmier
10-02-2007, 11:44 PM
It makes no business sense for trugreen to be doing this, it does not mesh with thier current employees or trucks, and they will have to do massive training, inventory investment, and truck purchases. I'm sure they will market this to thier current spray customers, but who will do the installs? the spray guys? nope, they are already spraying 48 weeks out of the year on average.

This business expansion will cost them plenty and their prices will reflect that. They'll probably have good branded lights, and they will spend some bucks to advertise and get bids. Their overhead will be way higher than us, so they can't give the lights away. If they use cheap lights and transformers, this will pay off for us in 2-3 years anyway when those systems fail.

The secret here is to be poised to be the 2nd bid some folks get for comparison. be in the yellow pages under outdoor lighting or lighting consultants, or direct mail so folks have your postcard in front of them every 3 months. If you focus on being a lighting specailist, not a spray company that installs lights, a good salesman should be able to get the job.

Lite4
10-02-2007, 11:46 PM
Well said Dave.

klkanders
10-02-2007, 11:59 PM
Lets get even.......we all throw broadcast spreaders in the back of our trucks, undercut them and put down some low cost fertilizers!

NiteTymeIlluminations
10-03-2007, 07:46 AM
Tru Green will not have their own line of lighting. I know this because we are supplying them with their lights. They may eventually try to get their own lights but who knows what will happen. Indy and columbus are their test markets. I truly, after thinkig abou tit for quite some time, think it will be great for the industry in these markets. They wil be spending huge amts of money on marketing, billboards, postcards, etc...and expose lighting to people who never really thought of it.

At this point they wil be targetting columbus Ohio and Indianapolis very very hard. PM me with any other questions.

bmwsmity
10-03-2007, 09:25 AM
I agree with you Doug.

Has TG Kill Lawn gained 100% market share? NO! There is plenty of business out there for landscapers. Why? Because they suck in so many ways...just like their lighting will suck in so many ways.

Also, look at it this way...do you think they would have decided to enter the market if they didn't believe there was good potential for growth? NO!

They probably got into the game for the same reason I did. Lighting (at least in my area) is still in the early growth phase of the product life cycle. This means there is still TONS of growth potential. Usually when some large company enters the market is when you see things really take off because of the awareness they bring to consumers.

Think about Plasma screen TVs. How many different brands of plasma tv's are there now? Dozens. Yet only one manufacturer introduced them (Pioneer), and when huge companies like Panasonic (Matsushita) with 10 times the size started marketing the crap out of them it brought a TON of business for a lot more companies instead of just one.

I currently do some work in Columbus (not much), so I'll be keeping an eye out for any feedback or marketing.

The other important thing we have to remember is this....TG will be treating lighting as a cookie-cutter approach with little creativity. In order to be quickly scalable, the only thing they can do is be very vanilla in their designs and offer very basic systems.

I doubt they'll even use an amp probe or record amp loads for the runs, just like other large companies. This means I'll be happy to go in and fix the melted down system they've created when a customer decides to change all their bulbs to higher wattages! :laugh: sizzle!

I say, market away TG. I'll be happy for the market exposure for our profession, and I'll gladly outsell them just like I've outsold them on fertilizing in the past.

It isn't such a hard thing to do when TG treats people the way they do. :hammerhead: "buy buy buy" "no, you CANT cancel our crappy services EVER!" :hammerhead:

NiteTymeIlluminations
10-03-2007, 10:18 AM
Well I dont know much about their company nor how they do business. I do know that they picked some great products and have the right guy in charge. He has been a nightscaping rep and Hadco rep and knows lighting inside and out. Don't underestimate what they wil be doing, that will be a mistake. They will be a force for sure. I wouldn't suggest bad mouthing them, I'd focus on what they are doing and how can you take advantage of it.

bmwsmity
10-03-2007, 11:04 AM
Well I dont know much about their company nor how they do business. I do know that they picked some great products and have the right guy in charge. He has been a nightscaping rep and Hadco rep and knows lighting inside and out. Don't underestimate what they wil be doing, that will be a mistake. They will be a force for sure. I wouldn't suggest bad mouthing them, I'd focus on what they are doing and how can you take advantage of it.

I don't underestimate those in charge, and those that they may put in place that will be choosing product and strategy. But we all know what kind of work you get from poorly paid workers (or even average pay workers).

I actually would rather they use good products, that way the consumer is educated about professional quality materials vs. home depot junk.

I'm glad they chose a knowledgeable person to head up the effort...that way consumers are at least being given correct information.

Most of my comments stem from my experience with what the company does in the fertilization market. I see the results, and I've personally talked to the dissatisfied customers. :cry:

All I'm saying is, I think it will work out for the better....those of you who are throwing your hands up in aggravation should look at the other side of the coin as well.

Thanks for the input Doug.

Chris J
10-03-2007, 02:16 PM
Well, I guess I'll just have to try and keep an open mind about it. You are all making good points, and I can't argue with your statements. When they move into my area, I'll just step it up once again and do my best to outsell them with superior quality and service.

bmwsmity
10-03-2007, 02:24 PM
Well, I guess I'll just have to try and keep an open mind about it. You are all making good points, and I can't argue with your statements. When they move into my area, I'll just step it up once again and do my best to outsell them with superior quality and service.

That is, IF they move into your area. :rolleyes:

The good thing for you Chris is that you are already well established in your market area. You do lots of mailings, have a great website, and a good customer base. Someone in your position is poised to really take advantage of a company that comes along and starts marketing the crap out of lighting, because as people's awareness is increased, they will think of YOU first since you have been putting yourself in front of them for so long.

For someone like me, who is still pretty new, I'm going to have to really work hard to build my brand and position in my target audience's mind to fully utilize the heightened awareness about our products.

We shall see.

bmwsmity
10-03-2007, 03:39 PM
Maybe a more accurate description here is that ServiceMaster, the parent company of TG, is getting into lighting?

Check this out:

http://www.servicemasterlandscape.com/lighting/landscape.html

The company was licensed by ServiceMaster in 1990. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ServiceMaster

Pro-Scapes
10-04-2007, 08:42 AM
It makes no business sense for trugreen to be doing this, it does not mesh with thier current employees or trucks, and they will have to do massive training, inventory investment, and truck purchases. I'm sure they will market this to thier current spray customers, but who will do the installs? the spray guys? nope, they are already spraying 48 weeks out of the year on average.

This business expansion will cost them plenty and their prices will reflect that. They'll probably have good branded lights, and they will spend some bucks to advertise and get bids. Their overhead will be way higher than us, so they can't give the lights away. If they use cheap lights and transformers, this will pay off for us in 2-3 years anyway when those systems fail.

The secret here is to be poised to be the 2nd bid some folks get for comparison. be in the yellow pages under outdoor lighting or lighting consultants, or direct mail so folks have your postcard in front of them every 3 months. If you focus on being a lighting specailist, not a spray company that installs lights, a good salesman should be able to get the job.

Yes but with thier buying power they should be able to overcome alot of the overhead... what the prob I see is low paid employees not giving a rats hairy butt how the install looks. I cant see them giving the service and care to a project that any of us give. I turned down a job last week even tho Im slow because they wanted me to use a cheaper fixture to save them 30 a light.... wasnt happening.

David Gretzmier
10-04-2007, 11:03 AM
Holy Snikees, the above link to servicemaster also mentions they do Christmas Lighting with Brite Ideas. I was a Brite Ideas distributor for 4 years. good looking product similar to what I sell now from Holiday Bright Lights. Inferior, but the customers don't know that.

my gut is telling me that I need to step up my marketing and be known as THE lighting guy in my area. The best fixtures, Service and effects. TG will easily out spend me on marketing, so I need to be the 2nd bid. It looks like this will be a separate company from Trugreen, much like Merry Maids is separate in cleaning.

My guess is they will do a "good enough" job. that seems to be the trend in thier companies. go for the largest market share and leave the upper crust to others.

I hate that because I love the bread and butter jobs that are easy, as the very high end requires more wire, trans, tunneling, climbing trees and thought. Sure they are pleasing to the eye when they are done, but much harder to staff guys for. a 20-30 light job you can bang out in a day may be a thing of the past. They will grab most of those.

I doubt they'll make too many mistakes on the load and light thing. If they are going for the mass market, They won't want a ton of callbacks. one days training will make sure they load the wires/trans properly.

bmwsmity
10-04-2007, 12:59 PM
I hate that because I love the bread and butter jobs that are easy, as the very high end requires more wire, trans, tunneling, climbing trees and thought. Sure they are pleasing to the eye when they are done, but much harder to staff guys for. a 20-30 light job you can bang out in a day may be a thing of the past. They will grab most of those.

Eh, I think they will probably go after mostly lower-mid to lower end homes, around $250-400k in my area. These types of buyers are more apt to buy under heavy sales pressure and heavy marketing. My guess is they'll probably take an approach similar to what I see the large franchises take (such as NiteLites), in which they charge $2800 for a 9 light system (actual price a customer paid...did a little "market research.") Mostly cookie-cutter systems, all the same stuff for everyone, all the same techniques, never anything original like downlighting from trees or using lenses and filters.

They may amp probe systems that are installed with the lamps that they spec, but that DOESN'T mean that they will compensate for homeowners that like to go put lamps in with double the wattage...they'll probably max out the runs with only 20-35 watt lamps in fixtures that take up to 50w.

SamIV
10-04-2007, 02:56 PM
Did they hire Bud Austin? He has been at this a very long time if that's the guy and is pretty sharp.

SamIV
Accent Outdoor Lighting

pete scalia
10-04-2007, 09:31 PM
As fellow Long Islander Billy Joel says-"Where's the fire what's the worry about you better cool it off before you burn it out. You've got so much to do and only so many hours in a day....."

My point is this. what makes you think this will be different than any other franchise operation that is out there already? If you are doing well with them now then what will change. The only ones to worry are those that find holes or weaknesses in their own operation. If you flame me, one can only figure that you are one of those. If you have no problem with my post then you're probably doing well and have no fear of the big bad wolf.

extlights
10-05-2007, 05:27 PM
I agree with Pete. Competition can help bring more business. I've never thought to myself "oh no, here's another competitor that's going to take business away from us". More often than not, we have the opportunity to get more business because of our competitors. Bring em' on.

Chris J
10-05-2007, 11:51 PM
Holy Snikees, the above link to servicemaster also mentions they do Christmas Lighting with Brite Ideas. I was a Brite Ideas distributor for 4 years. good looking product similar to what I sell now from Holiday Bright Lights. Inferior, but the customers don't know that.

my gut is telling me that I need to step up my marketing and be known as THE lighting guy in my area. The best fixtures, Service and effects. TG will easily out spend me on marketing, so I need to be the 2nd bid. It looks like this will be a separate company from Trugreen, much like Merry Maids is separate in cleaning.

My guess is they will do a "good enough" job. that seems to be the trend in thier companies. go for the largest market share and leave the upper crust to others.

I hate that because I love the bread and butter jobs that are easy, as the very high end requires more wire, trans, tunneling, climbing trees and thought. Sure they are pleasing to the eye when they are done, but much harder to staff guys for. a 20-30 light job you can bang out in a day may be a thing of the past. They will grab most of those.

I doubt they'll make too many mistakes on the load and light thing. If they are going for the mass market, They won't want a ton of callbacks. one days training will make sure they load the wires/trans properly.

Oh, so now your worried about them? Just kidding.
David, could you please explain this franchise thing to me? How could you be a Brite Ideas contractor for 4 years, then switch to another company? Don't they hold you to a contract, and don't they demand a no-compete clause? What are you now; a stand alone company or a franchise (which one)? I ask these questions only because I am being hammered by people wanting Christmas lights and I don't do it. Please PM me if you don't want to discuss this in the open forum.
Thank you!

Firefly Lighting
10-08-2007, 07:30 PM
Mr. Electric which is a national franchise is going to start offering landscape lighting as well.

JoeyD
10-08-2007, 07:32 PM
Mr Electric has been offering lighting for years. They use Unique Lighting products and we perform regular training classes with them every year. Most Mr. Electrics choose not to do lighting but the ones that d are usually pretty succesfull with it. I know of a few that do really well with the landscape lighting.

NightScenes
10-08-2007, 07:48 PM
Yeah, Mr. Electric has been doing it awhile. I don't want to say much more though. (At least in my area)

Chris J
10-08-2007, 09:54 PM
The Mr. Electric guy here is also part of Home Depot's contractor services for landscape lighting.

General Landscaping
10-08-2007, 10:50 PM
My question is....
How does a national company decide to do, in this case, lighting.
Somebody on site has to be a licensed contractor. Right?:confused:

In the case of Mr Electric does a national company hold the contractor license, then train their employees, as they see fit, to work unsupervised as a franchise?
It seems to go around everthing a contractor license stands for.

Then it really starts burning when a person like myself can't even sit for the test, in my case irrigation, without so many years field exp + foreman exp.

Lite4
10-08-2007, 10:59 PM
The Mr. Electric guy here is also part of Home Depot's contractor services for landscape lighting.

Hey Chris,
Home Cheapo pushes that Malibu crap, do they make him install that I wonder?

David Gretzmier
10-08-2007, 11:49 PM
Chris- to answer your question- we were one of Brite Ideas "distributors", we paid around 20 grand back in 2001 to sell thier product and use thier name,logos and etc. they had a unique product at the time called linkables. they are careful not to call it a "franchise" because if you do, then you have protected territories and are subject to franchise law. they also are very clear in thier contract- you can buy from other companies much the same way a lansdcape equipment company can carry other lines.

the problem in 2001 is 90% of the cords we bought from them failed in rain. we'd replace them, and failed again. they eventually settled with us on that. the product they made however, worked great. in 2002 and 2003, they started shipping product made in China. The welds on that failed about 20% of the time. frustrating to the point of pulling my hair out.

we were looking for another product line In 2004 when Holiday Bright Lights came along. It was started by one of the original partners in Brite Ideas -Scott Heese, who left Brite Ideas . I know now he must have been thier product guy as this guy lives and sleeps Christmas Lights. we started buying from them and they are absolutely great, easier to work with than Brite Ideas, and superior in every way. Anyone who has installed both would agree.

Brite Ideas sent me a letter saying they would not sell to me in 2006, and to my knowledge they have not extended that punishment to other Brite Idea distibutors who buy from Holiday Bright Lights. So a lawsuit would seem to be in order, but only if I can prove my company has been hurt financially by thier action. I can't. we have done far better since we made the switch.

So we are a stand alone company, not a franchise, and we buy primarily from Holiday Bright Lights. they don't have a no-compete clause.

Chris J
10-09-2007, 08:22 AM
Hey Chris,
Home Cheapo pushes that Malibu crap, do they make him install that I wonder?

David, thanks for the info and explaination.

Tim, I believe HD just sends him the lead and it is up to him to sell the client on the lighting. HD gets 25% of the sale, but he is allowed to use whatever products he can convince the client to use. I'm pretty sure this is how this works because I was approached by Home Depot a couple of months ago to take this over from Mr. Electric. It's still on the drawing board.

JoeyD
10-09-2007, 09:08 AM
My question is....
How does a national company decide to do, in this case, lighting.
Somebody on site has to be a licensed contractor. Right?:confused:

In the case of Mr Electric does a national company hold the contractor license, then train their employees, as they see fit, to work unsupervised as a franchise?
It seems to go around everthing a contractor license stands for.

Then it really starts burning when a person like myself can't even sit for the test, in my case irrigation, without so many years field exp + foreman exp.


Mr Electric is a franchise. Each franchise is responsible to own and have their own electricians/contractors liscense. All MR. Electrics are liscensed Electricians as far as I know. Most owned their own buisness or worked as electricians before buying into this particular franchise. electricians

NightScenes
10-09-2007, 09:29 AM
I currently do the lighting work for one of the Tru Green companies in Austin. If they end up doing it in-house I'm sure that they will be using the same guys that are putting in the plants. This will create a great service business for me and others because these guys could care less about how it operates once they are gone.

Chris J
10-09-2007, 04:45 PM
Man....I really dislike service. It makes my stomach hurt to think yet another company will be coming into the market to capture a portion of the market share and increase my service work. yee freakin haw!

pete scalia
10-09-2007, 07:44 PM
I'll give you the service, I'll take the install. that's where the money is

Chris J
10-09-2007, 09:18 PM
I'll give you the service, I'll take the install. that's where the money is

An agreement? I'm going to print this and paste it on my wall!

bmwsmity
10-10-2007, 08:23 AM
I think you might be missing an opportunity with service Chris.

Yeah, it's tough to figure out how much some other guy jacked up a system, but:

Service is usually much less product-intensive and more labor intensive...this increases cash flow.

Service gets you into new areas/subdivisions so you can then send a mailer out to the neighborhood letting them know you have done work for their neighbor (if their friends are doing it, it MUST be good, right?) Neighbors buy solar lights because other neighbors have them...imagine if it was a GOOD product the neighbors were copy-catting on? I.E. YOUR work! :)

Service gets you in front of new clients, who could refer you to other new (install) clients, as well as the possibility of adding new lights to maybe another area of their home (backyard?)

If you haven't figured it out yet, I LOVE service for these reasons. Probably 75% of my jobs have a service element to them, such as adding to old systems or replacing old systems. I really like it because it adds labor time to the jobs, which increases revenue and cash flow on each job.

Pro-Scapes
10-10-2007, 09:14 AM
service work for us has been alot bigger than new installs... rarly are clients willing to let you rip out an entire system they were once happy with. They will spend nearly as much fixing it up as a new system would cost.

If you price service work accordingly you should be able to fill in the small gaps. Say you run an install from 730 to 330pm... spend an hour or so doing service work and pick up a nice check for both at the end of the day. Yes it can be nerve racking but it is business. Unless your so busy with new installs and servicing your own work there is no reason not to jump on these calls. Wow them with your service and they will be more likley to reffer you over the previous installer.

"joe blow put my lighting in and i never saw him again but Chris Johnson came right out and fixed my problem... I wish I had used him in the first place!"

anyone else see oppurtunity there ? unless its a complete crap unsafe system if there is money to be made fix it.

bmwsmity
10-10-2007, 09:39 AM
"joe blow put my lighting in and i never saw him again but Chris Johnson came right out and fixed my problem... I wish I had used him in the first place!"

anyone else see oppurtunity there ? unless its a complete crap unsafe system if there is money to be made fix it.

You make a great point. I recently did a few hundred bucks worth of work for some people who had called one of the large franchises first. The guy wasn't interested in doing service work, so now I've got a new long-term customer, as well as the referrals from them. Whenever you let work go to a competitor, you are just making them stronger by boosting their revenue, which leads to more marketing ability for them. This must always be kept in mind.

One other point I forgot to make was that whenever I do service work, I always pitch them on a routine maintenance program. I just recently came up with this, and I'm kicking myself in the rear for not having done it sooner, because I will add up to thousands of extra revenue dollars per year.

For example, I just did only a few hundred bucks worth of work for someone on their small system, but I sold them a routine maintenance program that will bring in an additional $250 per year. Not a ton of money, but it doubled my revenue for that customer, plus I know I'll always be in front of him if he ever needs more lights.

JoeyD
10-10-2007, 09:55 AM
I see service as both a gift and a curse. Definite profit center for your buisness, but definite migrane center for your head when you walk on to a hacked lighting job with a homeowner who doenst want to spend $5 to make it right.

bmwsmity
10-10-2007, 10:09 AM
I see service as both a gift and a curse. Definite profit center for your buisness, but definite migrane center for your head when you walk on to a hacked lighting job with a homeowner who doenst want to spend $5 to make it right.

Well, of course that is always a headache. However, you get customers like that for new installs as well, who want everything done as cheaply as possible.

That is the one time I'm okay with letting someone go, because I know they aren't gonna make someone else stronger if they won't allow them to make ANY money.

pete scalia
10-10-2007, 08:41 PM
'll give you the service, I'll take the install. that's where the money is

bmwsmity
10-11-2007, 06:44 AM
'll give you the service, I'll take the install. that's where the money is

insightful

Pro-Scapes
10-11-2007, 08:09 AM
I see service as both a gift and a curse. Definite profit center for your buisness, but definite migrane center for your head when you walk on to a hacked lighting job with a homeowner who doenst want to spend $5 to make it right.

This is not your client then. Thank them for your time and move on.

'll give you the service, I'll take the install. that's where the money is
I respectfully disagree... WHile of course new installs are more lucrative and I think everyone will agree on that...unless your slammed with new installs for a few months out there is no reason not to take advantage of service work. If you dont service what you sell I think your classed as a trunk slammer... while you may do it right and do good work you leave the homeowner high and dry when they need you.

Even Mike Gambino who is 4-6 months backed up for installs spends time each day servicing his systems and taking care of his clients. Dont forget on service calls you can suggest expansions or popping in a few lights. I often send my clients both lighting and landscape little notes thanking them for being clients and include a list of recomendations. We often get a call from them saying great just do it all.

NiteTymeIlluminations
10-11-2007, 08:18 AM
I think its funny you guys think the jobs will be hacked in. Aren't you guys people who learned to do lighting or were you just born with the ablility? nobody taught you how to design and install? Nobody else is able to learn landscape lighting? People didn't say the same thing about you when you started in the business? And now you guys are the best and nobody else can get in the business???Everyone complains when someone else get inthe business but what if when you decided to get in the business someone complained to the person who took you nder their wing and told him to stop teaching you how to do lighting? you'd be on the outside looking in.

Dont sell anyone short, some of these guys may learn to do it, they may learn how to do it real well and they may be cleaning up your mess 5 years from now...I am not directing this to anyone at all, so nobody take offense, please...just trying to open people eyes to how they started out.

This business is not new. We've been around for a long time...say you've been in business for 6 years, you are still a virgin...and there are guys out there saying..."man that kid doesnt know what he's doing..."

Electricians say it every day. Irrigation guys say it everyday. Lighting designers say it every day. There may be a Tru Green kid in Columbus Ohio who may trun out to become winner of the IALD design award. Just like you!

pete scalia
10-11-2007, 08:27 AM
This is not your client then. Thank them for your time and move on.


I respectfully disagree... WHile of course new installs are more lucrative and I think everyone will agree on that...unless your slammed with new installs for a few months out there is no reason not to take advantage of service work. If you dont service what you sell I think your classed as a trunk slammer... while you may do it right and do good work you leave the homeowner high and dry when they need you.

Even Mike Gambino who is 4-6 months backed up for installs spends time each day servicing his systems and taking care of his clients. Dont forget on service calls you can suggest expansions or popping in a few lights. I often send my clients both lighting and landscape little notes thanking them for being clients and include a list of recomendations. We often get a call from them saying great just do it all.

I didn't say it wasn't necessary. Just less profitable than installs. Speaking of Gambino , someone in here turned me on to his website. He's got a killer article on there called Night eyes that was in some water magazine. I found it quite good along with alot of his other articles too.

Chris J
10-11-2007, 08:36 AM
In a perfect world, everyone would take care of their own systems and keep their clients happy. I have enough of my own customers that I really get bogged down if I have to take care of someones else's installations. My problem is that I have a hard time telling people "no". I feel bad for the people out there who have had lighting installed by these so called "trunk slammers" that were out for the initial install but don't want to take care of the systems.
I agree with both sides of this conversation: There is money to be made on service, but I can better utilize my time selling new systems rather than fixing somebody's mess. I'm a firm believer in taking care of your customers by providing "extreme" service, and we do that for the hundreds of customers that we have service agreements with. It's just very difficult to provide our customers with that level of service if we are also going to try to provide service to everybody elses customers.

Eden Lights
10-11-2007, 08:38 AM
There may be a Tru Green kid in Columbus Ohio who may trun out to become winner of the IALD design award. Just like you!

I think that if you sell or install, that eliminates your designs from any IALD awards? Does anyone know how to get your projects submitted if this is true, is there some kind of work around?

NiteTymeIlluminations
10-11-2007, 08:41 AM
I'm not sure...but what if he gets trained while at Tru Green, leaves starts a design firm, gets an award and gets on this forum and read his thread and...lol...I'm just saying, everyone on here knows that Tru green is going to hack jobs in...without knowing or even research what kind of trainingthey have going on...its intensive training...trust me!

Pro-Scapes
10-11-2007, 08:50 AM
I didn't say it wasn't necessary. Just less profitable than installs. Speaking of Gambino , someone in here turned me on to his website. He's got a killer article on there called Night eyes that was in some water magazine. I found it quite good along with alot of his other articles too.

while his bold ways may or may not work for alot of us his articles and his willingness to share thoes years of experience is top notch.

Eden Lights
10-11-2007, 08:59 AM
I'm not sure...but what if he gets trained while at Tru Green, leaves starts a design firm, gets an award and gets on this forum and read his thread and...lol...I'm just saying, everyone on here knows that Tru green is going to hack jobs in...without knowing or even research what kind of trainingthey have going on...its intensive training...trust me!

I wasn't really responding to your thread, I was just wondering if anyone knew much about IALD procedures since you brought it up?

Eden Lights
10-11-2007, 09:01 AM
I'm not sure...but what if he gets trained while at Tru Green, leaves starts a design firm, gets an award and gets on this forum and read his thread and...lol...I'm just saying, everyone on here knows that Tru green is going to hack jobs in...without knowing or even research what kind of trainingthey have going on...its intensive training...trust me!

I just want to know what accent fixture they will be using?????????????????

NiteTymeIlluminations
10-11-2007, 09:03 AM
15384azt for an accent

Eden Lights
10-11-2007, 09:08 AM
Excellent Choice, I think.

pete scalia
10-11-2007, 08:44 PM
while his bold ways may or may not work for alot of us his articles and his willingness to share thoes years of experience is top notch.

Bill, what do you mean when you say bold ways? I didn't get the idea he was flamboyant or anything like that. There is alot of stuff on the site you are right. I think it's something for some of us to aspire to. great photos. Good designer.

Pro-Scapes
10-12-2007, 12:08 AM
Bill, what do you mean when you say bold ways? I didn't get the idea he was flamboyant or anything like that. There is alot of stuff on the site you are right. I think it's something for some of us to aspire to. great photos. Good designer.

First off how come everyone decides to shorten my name ? Did I call you pet ? :-)

Anyways by bold i mean charging just to meet with clients... If the client has different views thank them for thier time and move on. Not all of us can be so bold as to pick and choose what we do and who we do it for. Must be nice to be that backed up.

pete scalia
10-12-2007, 12:19 AM
First off how come everyone decides to shorten my name ? Did I call you pet ? :-)

Anyways by bold i mean charging just to meet with clients... If the client has different views thank them for thier time and move on. Not all of us can be so bold as to pick and choose what we do and who we do it for. Must be nice to be that backed up.

Billy, Bill is better than calling you William right? I'm lazy and if I can drop a letter here or there I tend to do it. No offense. Guess you have a point with G. Perceived arrogance? Looks like he's done some jobs though.

JoeyD
10-12-2007, 09:39 AM
I would be real surprised if every Tru Green began doing lighting. I did a huge training for a Tru Green franchise in Oregon going back almost 5 years. They did some jobs for a few years and then just stopped doing it. Face it there buisness is cutting grass, not selling high end lighting systems. I dont think you guys have much to worry about here! Just keep doing what you do and worry about what it is going to take for your buisness to succeed and you will do just that, succeed. Weather TG or Mr Electric, or Night Lites rolls into town it should only mean more exposure for landscape ligthing in your area.