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View Full Version : Job ideas to make it through winter


green-pa
10-05-2007, 01:36 AM
I was thinking about truck driving but I don't even know how to drive a truck (semi) yet? Is the training hard?

Other ideas:

Dish network installer

Paper routes

Car Sales

Open up a day care ( and see if I can get my gf to do most the work; hee hee)

Anything but waiting tables ( my old job)

Just wanted to know what u guys think about these and/or if u have any advice to offer about these. This is my first year in the biz and the IRS took what I had in checking and saved ( b&$std$) for back taxes ( not lawn care biz related ). I know ther eis fall cleanups, snow removal, and things, but it seems most of those are hit and miss and surely won't equal the $/week I'm making at this time which is what I need to keep the bills paid.

Daddy Joes Lawn Service
10-05-2007, 06:55 AM
Make enough during summer to hold me till it starts up again i just sit back and relax!:sleeping: :sleeping: :sleeping: :sleeping:

LushGreenLawn
10-05-2007, 09:48 AM
some of the things you posted it seems you can't do part time.

People don't want to have a babysitter for half a year, just like your customers would not want you to mow for only 3 months.

A car dealership is going to want a salesman to be committed 24/7 365 days a year. What happens when your repeat customers need you during lawn season to buy a car.



Same deal with just about anything but a wage slave job where you won't make much. I would just relax or get a wage slave job you don't mind doing. I am going to work at Staples part time in the winter, more for something to do. Its what I used to do full time, and I enjoy it.

LushGreenLawn
10-05-2007, 09:51 AM
Actually, I almost forgot....

If you have a CDL you can deliver Heating Oil, propane, ect.. Some guys do that around where I'm from. Those companys have the same problem we do, most of their work is in the winter. I saw an ad in the paper the other day from a heating oil company that needed people from Nov. 1st through March 31st.

All_Toro_4ME
10-05-2007, 09:56 AM
Well from the jobs you mentioned, I saw two that might...might work. The paper route and the dish network installer. I've never done either job, but I have a cousin in TX that is a dish installer and makes bank at it. Lot of money in it, but not sure of the training or time commitment it takes to get to that point. The paper route would be more a like a small allowance, at least it would be around here. It doesnt pay all that well, but its "ok" money I guess.

Charles
10-05-2007, 10:29 AM
I thought about a dish network installer. The drawbacks are that you may have to be out of town for awhile. You will have to go under houses and trailer homes. You will have to get high up on ladders and work on steep roofs, risking life and limb.
Home heating oil or propane can be frigid work with risk of being bitten by dogs
Newspapers = 7 day work week where you tear up your auto for very little money
Auto sales--I agree, not just a wintertime job. You have to load people up with more payments than they can afford. After you run out of friends and family to sell to then you have to race other sales people to customers that walk on the lot. Most people can sale a few cars and not sale what the volume they require.
Retail--they work you to death then lay you off after Christmas
Trucking--not good for married people. Local routes require 2 years of experience

Sweet Tater
10-05-2007, 11:03 AM
I make lawn furniture during the winter and sell it, porch swings, aderondac chairs, picnic tables and such. sells mostly toward the end of the winter so the have it in the spring so it helps when the $$ start getting short at the end.
Plus I have a small black berry farm that makes extra in July.

davis45
10-05-2007, 11:57 AM
Factories will hire for a temp. job. I build pallets in a warehouse during winter.

avjohnson
10-05-2007, 12:29 PM
I've worked for an inventory service. They are super busy in January, Feb and March but the hours can be sporadic.

Charles
10-05-2007, 02:29 PM
You could get a bunch of women pregnant and become a regular on the "Maury Povich" show episodes "Who be my baby daddy:confused: ":laugh:

Ps hint: Don't take the DNA test:rolleyes: :hammerhead:

j/k

Inventory would be good to pay some of your bills. Like he said the hours are sporadic. You may ride 50 miles to work 4 hours sometimes

SCAG POWER
10-05-2007, 02:40 PM
WELL I USE TO OFF SET THE WINTER BY DRIVING A LIMO, UNTILL THE TIPS GOT SO BAD THAT WELL I MAKE MORE SITTING HOME.Requier customers to go all year and do not back down. It mite take a little tim e but it will be worth it.:usflag:

avjohnson
10-05-2007, 03:11 PM
I was thinking maybe doing taxes would be okay and educational...but crunch time is when LS starts up again so that's probably not so good.

capetan
10-05-2007, 03:50 PM
my supplemental income for my landscaping is car detailing ..... as long as the winters arent to harsh

sancho_man_orlando
10-05-2007, 04:46 PM
I focus on creative real estate. Usually pop a 5 - 15 K or two to get me through the winter months...

With foreclosures the way they are, people not being able to qualify there are plenty of good deals out there. I am interested in the really GREAT deals...

Knowing I have my annual customers feeding me will sure make it much more enjoyable this season!

Chilehead
10-05-2007, 06:30 PM
At the end of my first and second year I built bicycles for a leading retailer. Made nearly as much as I do mowing. Any sort of assembly work for retailers is decent pay: $700-850/week.

capetan
10-05-2007, 06:48 PM
thats funny sometimes help out at a local bike shop to

green-pa
10-06-2007, 01:24 AM
U guys have some interesting insite on this post. I was also thinking about:

Cab driver ( but I heard could be dangerous, and doesn't that wear your right ankle out always being on the break/gas for hours/day?)

Be a personal fitness trainer ( I'm studying for that now, but it's very difficult to digest this 550 page Encyclopedia size monster of a manual which is required learning to pass the test)

Pimp my gf to the local strip clubs and take 50% of her tips ( kidding)

Work for UPS ( but I heard most start at only like $9 an hour which isn't enough, I'd have to work 70 hours/wk to pay bills with that)

USPS; they claim to pay an avg of like $18/hr or something, but I've heard the actual start up rates are closer to $10-11/hr??? Also, if u don't pass the test for hire then u can't take it again for one year.

Throw parties at or near college campuses. I've heard u can make a lot doing this but it can be tricky and if not done right would cost more in legal fees and junk that it would be worth.

DJ parties, weddings, events, ect; I have a nice PA system and about 350 or more official cds and about 1,000 or more ( burned cd's). But I heard if u dj, u mustn't use burned discs cause they could be confiscated along with all of your equipment and u may also have to pay fines :( But perhaps the 350 I have would be enough??? But how hard is it to find clients for this?

green-pa
10-06-2007, 01:25 AM
I focus on creative real estate. Usually pop a 5 - 15 K or two to get me through the winter months...

With foreclosures the way they are, people not being able to qualify there are plenty of good deals out there. I am interested in the really GREAT deals...

Knowing I have my annual customers feeding me will sure make it much more enjoyable this season!

Do u fix em up and sell em or do u just list them and sell em? Is is very hard to aquire a license? My mom and bro did it for a while but neither was very good. However my bro and I were both very good at Audio Video sales but that is a much smaller fish to fry.

sancho_man_orlando
10-06-2007, 07:00 PM
Well... I got stuck with a couple of properties that turned into alligators (eating away at my wallet every month with holding costs) after I dropped 10's of thousands of dollars into fixing them up...

I was in the buy, fix & sell business. Couldn't eat anymore so I started this. Now I am mostly focusing on those properties where people can't afford them and they're willing to sign them away to someone who can make the payments. All goes well I get a free house...

I then turn around and market for someone that wants to own but maybe now can't qualify but for a few grand up front... I'll lock the price of the house in for up to 2 years, give them rent credits every month for on time payments and hopefully cash out in a few years when the market tightens up. In the meantime they are renting, hopefully a few dollars above the mortgage payment and I've collected the few grand up front...

sancho_man_orlando
10-06-2007, 07:02 PM
Oh and if you are buying/selling/renting for yourself you don't need a license. You'd need a license when you are the middle man/woman. Not to handle your own affairs.

Also, I really like mobile homes. I bought one for $500 about 18 months ago, put about 2k into it... for a total of 2,500 invested. Put a rent to owner in who had 1k down, (I had 1,500 left of my money in it) and collected 341 a month until this month... when they decided to up and move in the middle of the night. No biggie. I sold it 3 days later for... $1,500!

lawnscapesLLC
10-06-2007, 09:49 PM
I just started a kitchen and bathroom remodeling company, along with handyman type stuff to fill in extra space. Between mowing and remodeling i have not stopped working 12 hour days 7 days a week in a month. Good money and it fun so it's worth it. Plus have a fiancee, her 3 kids and my new one on the way so I have to make some money to feed all those mouths, lol.

Wells
10-07-2007, 01:52 PM
I have a younger brother thats an electrician and owns his own business and many times during the winter i'll go help him wire up new homes, helps keep me busy in between snow storms. I also use the winter months to experiment with new businesses, last winter I tried interior demolition (lots of potential), the year before that was painting (lots of work in painting). This year i'm going to try ski resort transportation (perfect season transition).

There are alot of contruction jobs available year round and most of them just want a warm body that will be reliable, roofers, carpenters, framers, HVAC, plumbers, etc.

If you want to work for yourself during the winter you can try your hand at snow removals, christmas lighting, tree work (lots of tree work during the winter), fire wood deliveries, pressure washing, deck/fence staining, etc.

I also think you could do well offering assembly services, especially around Chrstmas time. There are lots of single moms that could use help putting together swingsets, trampolines, bikes, etc for their kids.

Sweet Tater
10-07-2007, 01:59 PM
Pimp my gf to the local strip clubs and take 50% of her tips ( kidding)



Sounds like a winner to me rofl

Dunlaps LawnCare
10-11-2007, 10:21 PM
odd jobs snow plowing and fall clean up i work part time doing construction all year 2

green-pa
10-12-2007, 12:06 AM
Oh and if you are buying/selling/renting for yourself you don't need a license. You'd need a license when you are the middle man/woman. Not to handle your own affairs.

Also, I really like mobile homes. I bought one for $500 about 18 months ago, put about 2k into it... for a total of 2,500 invested. Put a rent to owner in who had 1k down, (I had 1,500 left of my money in it) and collected 341 a month until this month... when they decided to up and move in the middle of the night. No biggie. I sold it 3 days later for... $1,500!

SWEET! :laugh:

green-pa
10-12-2007, 12:08 AM
I have a younger brother thats an electrician and owns his own business and many times during the winter i'll go help him wire up new homes, helps keep me busy in between snow storms. I also use the winter months to experiment with new businesses, last winter I tried interior demolition (lots of potential), the year before that was painting (lots of work in painting). This year i'm going to try ski resort transportation (perfect season transition).

There are alot of contruction jobs available year round and most of them just want a warm body that will be reliable, roofers, carpenters, framers, HVAC, plumbers, etc.

If you want to work for yourself during the winter you can try your hand at snow removals, christmas lighting, tree work (lots of tree work during the winter), fire wood deliveries, pressure washing, deck/fence staining, etc.

I also think you could do well offering assembly services, especially around Chrstmas time. There are lots of single moms that could use help putting together swingsets, trampolines, bikes, etc for their kids.

I was thinking about construction, especially laying carpet. But I guess that's not construction. How much would a laborer expect to make? $15/hr would be decent, at least 'til next spring.