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FIMCO-MEISTER
10-12-2007, 08:07 PM
Henry (my other service guy and top assistant) is teaching me hi speed photography and I'm demoing the valvette.
These photos are prior to adjustment and then an adjusted nozzle

FIMCO-MEISTER
10-12-2007, 08:10 PM
Some hi speed photo

CAPT Stream Rotar
10-12-2007, 08:12 PM
s1ck....

is that an econo box above grade Peter?????

jk

Awsome photos..

what kind of camera?

FIMCO-MEISTER
10-12-2007, 08:15 PM
s1ck....

is that an econo box above grade Peter?????

jk

Awsome photos..

what kind of camera?

Sony T-100? cybershot. Econo was there. But I like them above grade in the beds.

Mike Leary
10-12-2007, 10:05 PM
The green box in pic # 4 is a Texas valve box.

EagleLandscape
10-12-2007, 10:18 PM
someone (besides peter) name that plant in the last picture

Kiril
10-13-2007, 09:27 AM
Without seeing more of the plant or the flower, my guess would be genus Rhododendron

PurpHaze
10-13-2007, 10:13 AM
Am I missing something or do your brass nozzles lack a break-up screw?

londonrain
10-13-2007, 10:37 AM
someone (besides peter) name that plant in the last picture
Abelia...................

FIMCO-MEISTER
10-13-2007, 10:45 AM
Am I missing something or do your brass nozzles lack a break-up screw?

No break up screw in brass nozzles. Are you referring to a screw similar to rotors or the screw in pl nozzles some use to shorten the spray distance?

PurpHaze
10-13-2007, 11:04 AM
No break up screw in brass nozzles. Are you referring to a screw similar to rotors or the screw in pl nozzles some use to shorten the spray distance?

Well... the screw on most spray heads that will cut down the radius or shut a particular nozzle off. Since your brass nozzles don't have these I can see why you'd be interested in the Valvette... but us plastic nozzle guys really don't need it because it's basically just reinventing the wheel. It seems to me to be an added expense to an already expensive (more than plastic) brass nozzle.

CAPT Stream Rotar
10-13-2007, 12:17 PM
Well... the screw on most spray heads that will cut down the radius or shut a particular nozzle off. Since your brass nozzles don't have these I can see why you'd be interested in the Valvette... but us plastic nozzle guys really don't need it because it's basically just reinventing the wheel. It seems to me to be an added expense to an already expensive (more than plastic) brass nozzle.

here here!


Plastic nozzles4life!

FIMCO-MEISTER
10-13-2007, 02:00 PM
Well... the screw on most spray heads that will cut down the radius or shut a particular nozzle off. Since your brass nozzles don't have these I can see why you'd be interested in the Valvette... but us plastic nozzle guys really don't need it because it's basically just reinventing the wheel. It seems to me to be an added expense to an already expensive (more than plastic) brass nozzle.

The problem I have experienced on the plastic screw is that they are not consistent. Turn it on one time get it adjusted and turn it on next time and it is different. I'm not trying to reduce the radius. I'm trying to kill the mist. Valvettes will keep the spray consistent on each operation of the zone and I would suggest that they would do a better job on plastic nozzle adjustment than the nozzles themselves. On brass nozzles we put on the radius we want. The radius I carry are 3', 5', 10', 12', 16' (the one in the pic) 20', 24' (a nozzle Rotar would love, mega water). I also think killing the flow away from the nozzle as opposed to right at it makes for a better spray. On my to do list is some hi speed photo on plastic nozzles. One note I do use some plastic nozzles when full spray and good spacing are not an issue.

Wet_Boots
10-13-2007, 03:24 PM
You do eliminate turbulence effects with the Valvette, just as you can by employing PCS screens with Rainbird nozzles, or by using the Toro nozzles with the restrictors built into the base.

Dirty Water
10-13-2007, 03:47 PM
You do eliminate turbulence effects with the Valvette, just as you can by employing PCS screens with Rainbird nozzles, or by using the Toro nozzles with the restrictors built into the base.

The little valve fixes a problem that does not exist.

If your misting, use pressure regulating heads. Problem solved.

Also, does the little valve stick up on heads?

Mike Leary
10-13-2007, 03:55 PM
Looks pretty hokey to me.:hammerhead:

Wet_Boots
10-13-2007, 04:21 PM
If your misting, use pressure regulating heads. Problem solved.It's not always about misting. Rainbird PCS screens allow coverages that no stock nozzles are made for (without throttling them down) and no concerns about drifting adjustments.

JoeinJasper
10-13-2007, 04:30 PM
someone (besides peter) name that plant in the last picture
__________________
Cleyera japonica A.K.A. Ternstoemia gymnathera

FIMCO-MEISTER
10-13-2007, 04:37 PM
The little valve fixes a problem that does not exist.

If your misting, use pressure regulating heads. Problem solved.

Also, does the little valve stick up on heads?

It fixes a problem that does exist. Remember I'm always dealing with systems that I did not install. In the yard we do use prs heads. On short risers the valvette can serves as our prs. (I don't like popups in the beds. Prefer short risers) Now I've only been tinkering with those for a couple of weeks to see how many real opportunities exist for their use. They seem to be a higher grade of plastic than the shrub adabters of the major manufacturers. I'll try anything and give it a fair shot. I'm sure you guys can get a free sample and use your own testing criteria. I'm seeing some opportunities for its use myself. I've tried the RB screens boots and have had hit and miss experience with them.

FIMCO-MEISTER
10-13-2007, 04:40 PM
Looks pretty hokey to me.:hammerhead:

The demo is mind blowing Mike.:blob2:

Mike Leary
10-13-2007, 04:50 PM
The demo is mind blowing Mike.:blob2:

Hokum, like pcs & adjustment screws. :dizzy:

EagleLandscape
10-13-2007, 05:35 PM
JoeinJasper is correct. Good thing the rest of you all are irrigators:)

Mike Leary
10-13-2007, 05:39 PM
JoeinJasper is correct. Good thing the rest of you all are irrigators:)

As long as it's green,we'll water it!:laugh:

EagleLandscape
10-13-2007, 05:59 PM
Well it's also a good thing that we know the water requirements of said plants:)
Red Yucca vs Rhodies:) just messin with ya

Kiril
10-13-2007, 06:35 PM
JoeinJasper is correct. Good thing the rest of you all are irrigators:)

Are you sure? Cleyera (Ternstroemia gymnanthera) is listed as having alternate leaf arrangement, the plant in the pic is palmately compound

Mike Leary
10-13-2007, 07:27 PM
I'm impressed with a few of you with your taxonomic expertise, it's a no
brainer for irrifolk, tho few think of it..works w/ the Client/LA/Designer to show them you're not as stupid as you look.:dizzy: I never have liked common
names...."bouncing bet"... tho I knew her in high school.

FIMCO-MEISTER
10-13-2007, 08:22 PM
Are you sure? Cleyera (Ternstroemia gymnanthera) is listed as having alternate leaf arrangement, the plant in the pic is palmately compound

It is cleyera. Lot of it in Big D. I'll take pic of the whole bush after I get a pic of Walkgood's request.

londonrain
10-13-2007, 08:23 PM
JoeinJasper is correct. Good thing the rest of you all are irrigators:)
Any guess what this is....and its proper name....

FIMCO-MEISTER
10-13-2007, 08:24 PM
looks like an RB seal off cap for its 1800s

Mike Leary
10-13-2007, 08:34 PM
a missile silo from above?

FIMCO-MEISTER
10-13-2007, 08:36 PM
That also appears to be the driver side of your front truck hood.

irrig8r
10-13-2007, 08:36 PM
Without seeing more of the plant or the flower, my guess would be genus Rhododendron

Ternstroemia