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Fieldman12
10-16-2007, 08:37 PM
A buddy of mine at several farms wants some rocks moved and loaded onto a trailer to take to his house. Now I have not yet seen the rocks or know what type of rocks they are. He claims they are about the diamter of a wheel barrow and between a 1' and 2' thick. He would like to hire me to move all twelve or so. Now I have no idea how heavy they are or have seen them yet. I may come take a look at them. All I have to do is pick them up, load them on the trailer and unload them at his house. I would rather not use my new bucket. Would a grapple be best to rent and move them? Will a 250 Series II move them?? Would you guys pass on a job like this? dont want a job if its going to putt allot of stress on my machine.

carcrz
10-16-2007, 08:41 PM
use some forks. You might be able to use a skid steer if you can balance them. Counter weights are probably in order depending on their weight.

cat2
10-16-2007, 08:49 PM
use forks, they are lighter than a bucket so you will have that much more lifting ability. I don't no if you can lift them or not I think you will be able to though. To you have the counterweights?

turfquip
10-16-2007, 09:05 PM
Those shouldn't cause damage to your bucket. You won't be slamming into them and tossing them around...no need. I wouldn't rent anything...that would be overkill. If they actually turn out to be as you described they may only be 200 - 250 lbs each.

cat2
10-16-2007, 09:07 PM
Now that I think about this more, you will pick those rocks up easily

dozerman21
10-16-2007, 09:14 PM
Those shouldn't cause damage to your bucket. You won't be slamming into them and tossing them around...no need. I wouldn't rent anything...that would be overkill. If they actually turn out to be as you described they may only be 200 - 250 lbs each.


I agree. A grapple or forks would be better, but not if you have to rent. That isn't very many rocks, and if they're the size he described to you, your loader will move them easily, just take your time.

Keep in mind how you're going to unload the rocks. I assume he has a flat trailer of some size? It will be harder and take longer to unload. Bring some chains along in case you need to wrap them around the rocks to pull them to where you can reach them. You might even be better pulling the rocks off to unlead them, if you can't run your machine on the trailer to get them in the bucket.

Dirt Digger2
10-16-2007, 09:17 PM
you should probably look at the rocks first..you might need a 943 or a 953 or a backhoe...i know that i can't move anything too big with our takeuchi...rocks get heavy fast, it may not look like it weighs that much but it does, especially if you are having to dig them out of the ground first....also once you load them, what are you going to be hauling it with?...i know DOT guys and state cops love to pull over odd shaped loads that are tough to tie down, such as if you are hauling with a skidloader trailer...dump trailer or dump truck you would be fine.

Fieldman12
10-16-2007, 09:31 PM
He is going to be hauling the rocks on a flatbed trailer. I asked him how much his trailer is rated for. Im trying to figure out possible how many it could hold. Im guessing it will probably not hold over two or three so Im betting it will be an all day job even though he does not live that far away. No I do not have the counter weight set on my machine. The rocks from what I understand are already out of the ground. I have not messed with that many large rocks. I just dont want to mess up my new bucket or get out there and not be able to budge them. He said he visited a place today that sells them and he said they moved them with skid steers and the rocks where placed on pallets. I would think all that weight in one spot would cruch a pallet.

Fieldman12
10-16-2007, 09:38 PM
I see allot of ads in brochures of them moving big things of concret and so on but it is usually a bigger machine than I have.

Fieldman12
10-16-2007, 09:39 PM
I see allot of ads in brochures of skid steers moving big things of concrete and so on but it is usually a bigger machine than I have.

SiteSolutions
10-16-2007, 09:57 PM
I have moved rocks that size and a little larger with my T-190. It's rated at 1900 pounds, with a tip load of around 6,000 pounds. A grapple makes it a lot easier to grasp the rocks, but a grapple weighs ~500 pounds more than a bucket, and is longer than a bucket, which takes away from your lifting capacity and gives the rock more leverage.

I don't know much about JD machines but they are supposed to be good lifters. Maybe someone with specific JD knowledge can chime in here?

Anyway, be careful, move the rocks to level solid ground for loading.

Sounds like transporting is up to the customer, which sounds like a good thing on this job.

Good luck, and get some pics!

Construct'O
10-16-2007, 10:05 PM
He is going to be hauling the rocks on a flatbed trailer. I asked him how much his trailer is rated for. Im trying to figure out possible how many it could hold. Im guessing it will probably not hold over two or three so Im betting it will be an all day job even though he does not live that far away. No I do not have the counter weight set on my machine. The rocks from what I understand are already out of the ground. I have not messed with that many large rocks. I just dont want to mess up my new bucket or get out there and not be able to budge them. He said he visited a place today that sells them and he said they moved them with skid steers and the rocks where placed on pallets. I would think all that weight in one spot would cruch a pallet.

First off be sure to get pictures:) Unless your busy doing something else i would run over there and take a look see! Practice on a few rocks around your place first.I would wether mess with rocks then ugly concrete with rebar hanging out all over it!:rolleyes:

If your careful i wouldn't think your would hurt the bucket any other then the paint.You would be suprised what a pallet will carry.Especially if they are oak pallets.If you had forks they would work good i would think.

If you had some pallets and loaded them on the pallets then onto the trailer it would make them easier to unload.

If you don't try you will never really know what your machine is able to do.:weightlifter: Just tell him that your give it a try and if it don't work,no foul!!!!!

If it's not far away,you might not be out much.

Good luck:usflag:

Fieldman12
10-16-2007, 10:58 PM
Construct'O I was just going to say I was thinking about trying to find some rocks around here on the farm to pick up just to see what it would do. I figure if they are the size he says they are it will probably pick them up. Just did not want to beat the crap out of my bucket since I use it for cutting pads and grading with.

Fieldman12
10-16-2007, 11:02 PM
Well, I know the owner of the farms has a big Deere wheel loader and a new 130hp Case IH with FWA and bucket so we may have access to that.

SiteSolutions
10-16-2007, 11:34 PM
Construct'O I was just going to say I was thinking about trying to find some rocks around here on the farm to pick up just to see what it would do. I figure if they are the size he says they are it will probably pick them up. Just did not want to beat the crap out of my bucket since I use it for cutting pads and grading with.

In my experience, damage to the bucket only comes from prying the rocks out, or trying to pry them out, with the teeth or edge. I've never hurt my bucket just picking up and carrying large or heavy items.

wanabe
10-17-2007, 12:16 AM
You can move them just fine. I have moved stones that were 6 foot long, 4 foot wide and 8 inches thick with a CT322. Get a good set of forks on that machine and you will make some easy cash. Do yourself a favor and find some old lumber to throw under them before you place the on the trailer. It will be much easier to unload.

RockSet N' Grade
10-17-2007, 10:40 AM
YaHooo! Rocks!! Gotta love em!! Skid with forks or bucket will work fine for those little baseballs. Forks would certainly work better. Lots of 2x4 scrap to put underneath so you can fork em off easier. If all you have is a skid and trailer........you can do it, I used to do it, but prefer excavator/thumb and dump truck with highlift or barndoor to get them there. You have about 12-14 ton of rock to move if the size you gave is correct. And if the size you gave is correct, they weigh more than 200 lbs a piece.....guarenteeeeed!

RockSet N' Grade
10-17-2007, 10:45 AM
Opps, sorry.....if you only have 12 wheel barrowed sized 2'ers, the gross weight will be around 9 tons.

ksss
10-17-2007, 08:23 PM
Rock Set this is where I would mock your Utah education. However since your an import I wont do that......Ok maybe your environment is sucking away your ability to cypher. Try 1-800-ABC123 (Its the hooked on math/phonics folk they would be happy to help).:waving:

Fieldman12
10-17-2007, 08:34 PM
Thanks for all the good info guys. He is suppose to get back with me what he wants to do. Some time I would like to go see the rocks. I wont ever tell someone I will do a job unless I see what they have first.

turfquip
10-17-2007, 09:10 PM
Opps, sorry.....if you only have 12 wheel barrowed sized 2'ers, the gross weight will be around 9 tons.


Damn guys, a wheelbarrow is what...3 foot wide and maybe 5 feet long? A rock that size one inch thick I can stand it on its edge by hand...maybe 175 lbs max? Maybe I'm delusional I dont know

Fieldman12
10-17-2007, 09:25 PM
This is one foot to two foot thick.

jd270
10-17-2007, 09:32 PM
id take the bucket and the forks ive moved rocks that just fit into my 84 inch bucket .....it depends on what kind of rocks they are but you shouldnt have any trouble with that size of rocks

Dirt Digger2
10-17-2007, 09:47 PM
Opps, sorry.....if you only have 12 wheel barrowed sized 2'ers, the gross weight will be around 9 tons.

i dont know...i was working a job right in the middle of a town this summer and we had to truck all the dirt out...in between me loading trucks when there was no trucks at the job i would be pushing around dirt, pushing up the pile, etc... a neibhor guy came over with a wheel barrow and wanted me to load him with my Cat 943...haha...i did, and i swear each load must have weighed 9tons...ended up tipping me $20 for loading him 15 times...not bad i'de say

turfquip
10-17-2007, 09:56 PM
This is one foot to two foot thick.

doh! sorry...

:laugh:

RockSet N' Grade
10-17-2007, 10:39 PM
Well KSSS, I would phone hooked on fonics.......but I can't see the phone numbers.....and I can't find my glasses. :) We buy rock all the time by the truck load. The basic numbers we use: each load of two/three footers in a ten wheeler weighs 12k.-14k and each load stacked is about 90-100 sq. ft. I guess I got so excited about rock, I got a little carried away.......

Construct'O
10-17-2007, 11:17 PM
Well KSSS, I would phone hooked on fonics.......but I can't see the phone numbers.....and I can't find my glasses. :) We buy rock all the time by the truck load. The basic numbers we use: each load of two/three footers in a ten wheeler weighs 12k.-14k and each load stacked is about 90-100 sq. ft. I guess I got so excited about rock, I got a little carried away.......

All i have to say is just be careful how you get your rocks off !!!!!!:cool2: O' i meet unloaded:)

SiteSolutions
10-18-2007, 12:10 AM
Time to break out the POCKET REF...

Weight of solid limestone is 4401 lbs per cu yd or 163 lbs per cu ft.

Sandstone weighs slightly less, granite slightly more, but whatever kind of rocks they are this should be a good guesstimate.

for example...

2 ft x 4 ft x 1.5 ft = 12 cu ft
12 cu ft x 163 lbs / cu ft = 1956 lbs

3 x 5 x 1.5 x 163 = 3667.5 lbs

And the 1" thick rock probably weighs about...

3 x 5 x 1/12 x 163 = 203.75 lbs