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el toro
10-17-2007, 06:17 AM
whats up guys. I install about 3-6 irrigation systems per year, but would like to do more and am thinking of buying a used trencher. For a small system I rent a ditchwitch walkbehind trencher, for a big one I rent a big ride on trencher. the ride on is quick and digs deep but is expensive to rent and too big for some applications. the walk behind is cheap but takes forever to go through hard ground and roots. I guess my question is how good are dingos? I've never run one, but it looks like they would be a great cross between the two machines. they also come with a bunch of other attachments which is a plus. Any thoughts would be appreciated!

kyfireman2004
12-09-2007, 03:31 PM
Could someone follow up this thread. I am also in the same boat as el toro..........

Wet_Boots
12-09-2007, 03:44 PM
Trenching? Or plowing? Soil permitting, a plow is the neatest, and you pay more for that neatness.

Mike Leary
12-09-2007, 03:50 PM
For small trenching..we like......http://www.brownmfgcorp.com Had two of them.

londonrain
12-09-2007, 05:35 PM
Anything Ditchwitch.....end of story

Wet_Boots
12-09-2007, 05:48 PM
Vermeer makes a good heavy plow, not to mention trenchers. Local support is important, if you don't have a lot of experience with this sort of equipment.

Mike Leary
12-09-2007, 06:13 PM
It's pretty site specific....the Vermeers & Ditchwitches do a great job, but tear the hell
out of the site, making backfill & topdress expensive, not to mention hauling off the
spoils the trencher brought up! If you're doing small residential, the Brown is your baby,
we rented the big boys when needed. London needs the exercise, so he backfills!:laugh:

Wet_Boots
12-09-2007, 06:39 PM
If you can plow, you eliminate the backfilling requirements. I'd think Kentucky would be poly pipe territory, but only the person asking the question can know what he wants.

Mike Leary
12-09-2007, 06:56 PM
If you can plow, you eliminate the backfilling requirements. I'd think Kentucky would be poly pipe territory, but only the person asking the question can know what he wants.

How can a person asking a question know what they want????:dizzy:

zman9119
12-09-2007, 07:06 PM
We use the LM-42 if we absolutely have to trench... if we don't, turn it around and plow away. Best of both worlds. We have 10 of them in operation at any given time, and they seem to be a pretty good machine.




.mz

hoskm01
12-09-2007, 07:35 PM
Check out the new Zahn from DW. Looks cool. Same as Dingo but a bit small/ maybe cheaper.

http://www.ditchwitch.com/zahn.asp

Mike Leary
12-09-2007, 08:47 PM
Check out the new Zahn from DW. Looks cool. Same as Dingo but a bit small/ maybe cheaper.

http://www.ditchwitch.com/zahn.asp

Major investment..gotta have work or wife/partner working until it can
be amortized..still gotta make the payments...at this point with the
economy as it is, I'd hold.

GravelyNut
12-09-2007, 10:57 PM
A DW if you have small spaces to work with and rock. The smaller units if in clay or loose soil are fine.

What kind of soil and sub-soil conditions do you have in your area.

Down here, nothing beats a Cleveland Model 110 for laying pipe if you have rock only and a large amount of pipe to lay. :D

JeffY
12-10-2007, 10:37 AM
I demo'd a Zahn. It is a nice machine, but get some rocky soil or hit major tree roots...you will vibrate your teeth fillings out.

BrandonV
12-14-2007, 04:37 PM
you need a mini skid or something similar, if you're only doing <10 installs a year, you'll at least be able to use it for something else. maybe get a reliable sub contractor and save your self some pesos.

dallas05
01-21-2008, 09:19 PM
dingo with trencher attachment