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Bill S
11-10-2007, 08:01 PM
Anyone have experience with these. We installed two a month back and one is having issues with the bulbs. They keep loosening up. We ordered the fixture for low voltage 100 watt bulbs (they have this as an option).

There is a little bit of grey on the socket...

Ideas??? :confused:

irrig8r
11-10-2007, 08:11 PM
Have you met Rob Dischino at Nightscaping? My recollection is that he's in Massachusetts. I bet he can help. I can't put an actual email in this message, but it's (first initial)(last name)(at)nightscaping(dot)com.

pete scalia
11-10-2007, 08:18 PM
Anyone have experience with these. We installed two a month back and one is having issues with the bulbs. They keep loosening up. We ordered the fixture for low voltage 100 watt bulbs (they have this as an option).

There is a little bit of grey on the socket...

Ideas??? :confused:

Did you try sand papering the grey off.

Chris J
11-10-2007, 10:02 PM
Learning something new every day. I wasn't aware that there were 100w lamps available for low voltage lighting. Is this common, or is this a very rare occurrence? I seldom find it necessary to go beyond 35w in a typical landscape setting, thus the reason for my ignorance. Please enlighten me (pun intended).

pete scalia
11-10-2007, 10:07 PM
Learning something new every day. I wasn't aware that there were 100w lamps available for low voltage lighting. Is this common, or is this a very rare occurrence? I seldom find it necessary to go beyond 35w in a typical landscape setting, thus the reason for my ignorance. Please enlighten me (pun intended).

I think it's a 100 watt medium base srew in type A-lamp but don't quote me.

ccfree
11-10-2007, 10:56 PM
Learning something new every day. I wasn't aware that there were 100w lamps available for low voltage lighting. Is this common, or is this a very rare occurrence? I seldom find it necessary to go beyond 35w in a typical landscape setting, thus the reason for my ignorance. Please enlighten me (pun intended).

You can actually get a 100w bi pin lamp. It is a T-6 I believe. Only seen it in a Hadco underwater light.

Chris J
11-10-2007, 11:09 PM
This is very interesting. I can invision the heat disipation from the water, allowing for the greater wattage, but I can't imagine the situation in which you would need a 100w lamp under water unless you were trying to illuminate Niagra Falls!
ccfree, you're in Texas....:confused:

ChampionLS
11-11-2007, 05:32 AM
Learning something new every day. I wasn't aware that there were 100w lamps available for low voltage lighting. Is this common, or is this a very rare occurrence? I seldom find it necessary to go beyond 35w in a typical landscape setting, thus the reason for my ignorance. Please enlighten me (pun intended).

Goto your local camping supply store. These are regular Edison base (screw type) light bulbs used in campers, mobile homes, and boats.

The Hardscaping contractors use them in lanterns on top of Pillars to avoid having to use conduit, as required with line voltage.

-Anthony

pete scalia
11-11-2007, 09:58 AM
Goto your local camping supply store. These are regular Edison base (screw type) light bulbs used in campers, mobile homes, and boats.

The Hardscaping contractors use them in lanterns on top of Pillars to avoid having to use conduit, as required with line voltage.

-Anthony

So I think you are saying Pete is correct.

ChampionLS
11-11-2007, 01:56 PM
Yup yup yup...