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The Lighting Geek
11-20-2007, 10:24 PM
Hey guys, I found a rather reasonable manual wire stripper for recycling wire. Here is the scoop on it:

'The single most efficient way to recover scrap copper. With the price of salvage copper where it is today it makes sense to recycle your used copper cable and wire. Use our AW1500 Hand wire stripper to make the job easy and fast. This is the tool that everyone in the electrical and salvage industries have been waiting for.'

FEATURES

Capacity - 14 Gauge up to 1-1/2"
Bench or Vice Mount
4" Hand Wheel
Fine Thread Adjustment
Brass Input Bushings
All Steel Locknuts
Quick Adjustment
tool steel cutter strip any length of wire Self-Guiding
9 Pounds - 18 Inches Tall
Adjustment Slots Double as Lubrication for Cutter and V-Roller

(Patent Pending)

Price: under $500.00

I bought one and will let you know how it works. Maybe someone else has one? We save all of the removed and scrap wire from our jobs and put it in a plastic trash can. When I called the recycler I found out that I can get another 1.00 per pound if it is stripped. Just thought it was a simple way to recoup some waste and such.

Chris J
11-20-2007, 10:44 PM
Hey guys, I found a rather reasonable manual wire stripper for recycling wire. Here is the scoop on it:

'The single most efficient way to recover scrap copper. With the price of salvage copper where it is today it makes sense to recycle your used copper cable and wire. Use our AW1500 Hand wire stripper to make the job easy and fast. This is the tool that everyone in the electrical and salvage industries have been waiting for.'

FEATURES

Capacity - 14 Gauge up to 1-1/2"
Bench or Vice Mount
4" Hand Wheel
Fine Thread Adjustment
Brass Input Bushings
All Steel Locknuts
Quick Adjustment
tool steel cutter strip any length of wire Self-Guiding
9 Pounds - 18 Inches Tall
Adjustment Slots Double as Lubrication for Cutter and V-Roller

(Patent Pending)

Price: under $500.00

I bought one and will let you know how it works. Maybe someone else has one? We save all of the removed and scrap wire from our jobs and put it in a plastic trash can. When I called the recycler I found out that I can get another 1.00 per pound if it is stripped. Just thought it was a simple way to recoup some waste and such.

Please keep us posted Tommy. I scrap jobs on a weekly basis, and I'm sure I could re-coup the cost of this machine very quickly with the recycled wire. Let us know what you find! :waving:

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
11-21-2007, 01:52 AM
Very cool looking tool there Tommy. Let us all know how well it works.

I have had no end of trouble trying to get rid of scrap wire here. None of the scrap guys seem to want wire in this area, meanwhile my Father-In-Law (A retired LV Landscape Lighting guy) was getting a several hundred bucks a year for his scraps in the GTA.

Even our local dump/recycling facility (waste transfer site) will not accept wire! I have had to resort to 'hiding it' at the bottom of garbage bags and taking it to the landfill. This really annoys me because it is so senseless.

One way I found to really reduce the amount of scrap wire is to switch to using only 300meter (1500 feet) spools of wire. This way I am not left with rather long pieces of unuseable wire at the end of a 75m spool. I also am pretty diligent about laying my wire runs out on the ground and cutting it to length before I dig it in.

I think that smaller operations are probably more efficient in their use of wire simply because the installer is closer to paying the bills! I have seen large companies generating huge amounts of scraps simply because the installers were rushing and probably not feeling the pain of having to pay for the wire.

Have a great day.

Chris J
11-21-2007, 02:35 AM
One way I found to really reduce the amount of scrap wire is to switch to using only 300meter (1500 feet) spools of wire. This way I am not left with rather long pieces of unuseable wire at the end of a 75m spool. .

Holy Crap! You can buy spools of wire that big? My laborer (excuse me, laboruer) would have a fit if I told him to handle that thing.

BTW, I've found a great wire supplier. Really soft jacket, UL listed. Let me know if you want more info.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
11-21-2007, 02:55 AM
Holy Crap! You can buy spools of wire that big? My laborer (excuse me, laboruer) would have a fit if I told him to handle that thing.

BTW, I've found a great wire supplier. Really soft jacket, UL listed. Let me know if you want more info.

(try Labourer... LOL) The 300m spools are really quite nice once you get over the weight of them. I just set one up on my rack-a-tiers unit at the transformer and pull wire all day long.

As for the wire supplier you mentioned.... We have lots of great UL listed wire available here, but our ESA is making a move requiring us to use only CSA listed wire. I have used it before and it has a much thicker jacket then the the 'normal' 12/2. There is a good supply of it here, but because it has been seldom used the cost is higher then the 'normal' stuff. This should change as our market starts demanding the CSA wire.


Thanks Neighbour!

(Oh I just thought up a funny... LOL "Neigh-boor" def: a loud and rude person living adjacent to you. LOL)

NightScenes
11-21-2007, 08:50 AM
This is a tool I've been waiting for!! Please let us know how it goes Tommy!!

deere615
11-21-2007, 06:10 PM
Thats just what I need I usually burn my wire, where did you get it from, who makes it?

Lite4
11-22-2007, 10:23 AM
Jeez James, Have the liberal environmental nutjobs in Canada banned you guys from recycling now? I guess that operation is not GREEN enough for them. Well, don't feel bad they have infected us with their nonsensical, country destroying, poison to, and we are beginning to see it's effects in America. How ridiculous is it that you have to hide an expensive natural, recyclable, resource underneath "trash" just to get rid of it. Sounds like they want the trash more than the copper. This sounds like someone has infected them with a mental illness. I don't understand.

ChampionLS
11-22-2007, 01:43 PM
That units not bad, but a lot of money for low voltage lighting cable. I could see if you were a line man or something.

Heres some smaller ones that may work:

Auto-Size Squeeze-n-Strip Flat Cable Stripper

Just feed cable through the front and squeeze the handle to strip cable in the middle or end. The tool's high alloy steel blades automatically adjust for cable size and pull insulation off the cable. Perfect for stripping flat cable up to 15/32" wide with 18-10 AWG solid and stranded conductors. Strips both the outer sheathing and inner insulation without nicking the wire. Ideal for Romex, telephone wire, and ribbon cables. Body is thermoplastic. Overall length is 6 3/4".





Comfort-Grip Cable Jacket Stripper

Specially designed phenolic handle fits the shape of your hand and prevents skinned knuckles caused by hitting the cable sheath. Use to strip sheaths from plastic- and fabric-covered solid and stranded wire up to 1" OD. Includes two extra blades. Overall length is 6".

ChampionLS
11-22-2007, 01:49 PM
Hey guys, I found a rather reasonable manual wire stripper for recycling wire. Here is the scoop on it:

'The single most efficient way to recover scrap copper. With the price of salvage copper where it is today it makes sense to recycle your used copper cable and wire. Use our AW1500 Hand wire stripper to make the job easy and fast. This is the tool that everyone in the electrical and salvage industries have been waiting for.'

FEATURES

Capacity - 14 Gauge up to 1-1/2"
Bench or Vice Mount
4" Hand Wheel
Fine Thread Adjustment
Brass Input Bushings
All Steel Locknuts
Quick Adjustment
tool steel cutter strip any length of wire Self-Guiding
9 Pounds - 18 Inches Tall
Adjustment Slots Double as Lubrication for Cutter and V-Roller

(Patent Pending)

Price: under $500.00

I bought one and will let you know how it works. Maybe someone else has one? We save all of the removed and scrap wire from our jobs and put it in a plastic trash can. When I called the recycler I found out that I can get another 1.00 per pound if it is stripped. Just thought it was a simple way to recoup some waste and such.


I found a similar one thats powered by a electric drill.. looks like this one but 1/2 price.

NightScenes
11-22-2007, 01:49 PM
This is also interesting. Where Can we find out more about this tool?

The Lighting Geek
11-22-2007, 04:01 PM
I recieved mine Wed. and it looks very well built. I will pay for this in the first trip to the recycler. Here is more info:

California inventor markets device to speed large-scale wire stripping

Santa Ynez, Calif - Jeff Adkins knows about wire strippers.
His business is stripping insulation from scrap wire on a
custom basis, and in 15 years of dealing with contractors,
wholesalers and scrap dealers, he guesses he has
stripped 100 tons of wire. After trying all the strippers he
could buy, he decided none could do the job he wanted.

So he designed and built his own, and now he has
applied for a patent on the design and has gone into
business manufacturing and selling it. “They’re starting
to catch on. I’ve sold 46 so far, and word’s getting
around,” Adkins said of his $450 machine. Before he started
building his stripping machines, Adkins’ fulltime business
was setting up in the yards of owners of large quantities of
wire and stripping the material for them for 20 cents per
pound. The owners could then sell the wire, Adkins said.
It was hard work, but he found it was easier with his
home-built stripper, which evolved into the device he sells
today. “Guiding and adjustment are everything if you want
your stripper to work right, and those are what my machine
does right. You have to cut the insulation, but you don’t
want the cutter to touch the conductor. If it does, it makes
a mess and you end up getting cut handling the stuff,” he said.

Adkins’ machine has a fine thread adjustment for the cutter,
replaceable thin brass shim stock guides, and accommodation
for wire from 14 gauge to 1˝ inches in diameter, including
high-voltage wire with shielding. The 9-pound, 18-inch-tall
device can be mounted on a bench or clamped in a vise. It takes
out most kinks and bends in the wire as it strips, Adkins said.
“It’s meant to be operated only by hand, but you can do 50
pounds of wire an hour and more, and a take-up reel could be
added to make it even more efficient,” Adkins said.

For information, call Adkins at (805) 344-4818

deere615
11-22-2007, 07:26 PM
I found a similar one thats powered by a electric drill.. looks like this one but 1/2 price.

What is the brand of it and where can one buy it? That sound pretty cool!

ChampionLS
11-23-2007, 12:00 AM
www.bigbuks.com

NightScenes
07-25-2008, 05:44 PM
So, I thought I would revive this thread. I bought a wire stripper from www.striptec.com and am now stripping out a bunch of scrap wire. What do you guys think should be the smallest piece of wire to keep for future use in installation, 25', 35', 50'?

I know I have about 1000 lbs of wire around here so I see a lot of work ahead of me.

The Lighting Geek
07-25-2008, 06:06 PM
i keep a couple of 50, 75, 100. the rest is recycled

Mike M
07-25-2008, 08:20 PM
Can anyone translate a market value for the wire? What are the scrap yards giving you per foot of 12 gauge? I know they probably pay per pound, but please equate that to length if anyone can.

Thanks!

Lite4
07-25-2008, 11:22 PM
Man, I must be stingy with my wire. I save anything over 10 feet long in 12/2 for leads on shorter hubs. When I put a box of scaps together they are all pretty small. I get .81 per pound unstripped.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
07-26-2008, 12:26 AM
I found the best way to reduce the amount of scrap wire I end up with is to switch away from 75m and 150m spools and go right to 300m spools. (1500 feet or so)

Most of the scrap wire I ended up with was "end of the roll" lengths that would not do the job. Now I have way fewer 'end of roll' situations.

I just place the big reel on a set of Rack-A-Tiers at the transformer and pull away. I might end up with a small box of scraps that are 6 inches to a couple of feet at most at the end of a large installation.

Waste not, Want not... or something like that.

Lite4
07-26-2008, 02:02 AM
James,
It sounds like you and I utilize the same practices of larger rolls and dry laying in trenches to measure. I may have between 6" to 9' of waste from one 1000' roll. Not to shabby. It is so expensive, I don't like to get careless with my measurements.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
07-26-2008, 09:12 AM
:) I generally try to avoid "Dry Laying", especially in trenches Tim, but when it comes to wire management it is the way to go.

Now that I have two installers working away, it is also the best way to teach them and communicate to them exactly how I want the circuits to be built.

Have a great day.

NightScenes
07-26-2008, 10:34 AM
I use 500' rolls but I guess I may see about going to 1000's. That would eliminate some of the scrap. I have a boatload of pieces that are 20', 30', 15' and so on that are #10 and 12. I do save the 16 unless it's less than 12'.

Clean copper is going for over $3 a pound now and scrapping is a booming business.

Mike M
07-26-2008, 06:41 PM
What is dry-laying wire, pulling before digging? That's how I do it.

I try to guestimate slack at the end to compensate for how the trench eats it up a little. I hope I get better at this with time, because I get a few feet of wasted scrap at my hubs/connections.

Lite4
07-26-2008, 06:49 PM
Sorry Mike. I am a Moron. I didn't explain that very well did I. I dig all my trenches and then I lay my wire in the trenches as I pull it off the spool. This way I get exactly the right amount of wire without waste. Cut to fit, so to speak.

Chris J
07-26-2008, 07:42 PM
Just thinking out loud here, but has anyone ever considered splicing all these 25-50' lenghts together with Ace connectors and making another spool? I know it's sounds like a jerry-rig, but what would be your concerns?

NightScenes
07-26-2008, 08:02 PM
There are a couple of reasons that I probably wouldn't do the splice thing. First, each splice is a place where something goes wrong (a weak link so-to-speak). If something were to go wrong at these splices you would have a time trying to find it. Second, each connection contributes to voltage drop. I have thought about this though as the price of copper has continued to climb.

Lite4
07-26-2008, 08:15 PM
I purchased a ground fault circuit detector to locate nicks in wires caused by gophers, ground hogs and random shovel attacks. I have located a nick in sprinkler decoder wire 4' down and with a couple of inches of the fault location. This tool is amazing if you are worried about finding a ground fault or voltage "leak" somewhere along your line due to a nick or slice in your insulation.
As to the question of splicing, I agree you would have some volt drop but hey, that's why we have multitaps right? Pump Pump pump it up.

Chris J
07-26-2008, 09:51 PM
Paul, I had the same thoughts. But as Tim pointed out, the fractional amount of VD is no worry with multi taps. Also, ACE connections and solder connections are pretty much as strong as the wire itself. I'm going to have to sleep on this. I just might start splicing all my longer scraps together.

klkanders
07-27-2008, 02:31 AM
Some of those lengths you guys are scraping I consider useable. For example a 5 light T with the home run connected to the center fixture. Not much voltage drop if you use a 15,20, or 25' piece on the other lights. I can see connecting a few of them as Chris mentioned also.

Keith

Lite4
07-27-2008, 11:44 AM
Absolutely right Keith.
When I start a job, I take out all of my 10' or longer scraps from previous jobs and lay them out straight on the lawn so I can see what I have. When I am not installing Unique with the Pre made leads, I will grab one of my precut wires off the lawn that is very close in length to what I need instead of pulling off the spool. You may also need a 10'-20' homerun. Use one of the pre cut scraps you have layed out and preserve your spool for longer runs. Just the way I do it. I would rather reuse than recycle.

Pro-Scapes
04-05-2010, 04:57 PM
Lets bring this back up to the top. Im looking behind the shop at about 800 pounds of scrap wire. Called the scrap yard and they are offering 20-30 cents per pound in the jacket or 2.80 a pound without.

How are these striptech machines working ? I really want a power machine or one that would run off a drill. Does anyone burn the wire ? I have a nice burn pit here. Any tips for going that route ?

irrig8r
04-05-2010, 06:36 PM
Burning PVC wire jacket puts out thick black smoke and lots of pollutants you probably don't want to expose yourself, your family, or your neighbors to... and according to some sources, some carcinogenic residues stay with the wire...

And I don't know about in Miss., but it can get you a citation here.

The Lighting Geek
04-05-2010, 06:41 PM
If you have 10g or larger, the stripper I bought (get your mind out the gutter Gregg:-) works well, but is a pain for 12g and forget 14 or smaller.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
04-05-2010, 07:03 PM
I have seen a power stripper (well a few actually! LOL) that works really well.. only issue was the cost. I checked it out a couple of years ago and the machine was over $500, then there is the time to run all the scrap through it.

Now I just donate all my scrap wire to a local gal who raises money for charity. Better her than me when it comes to all that stripping. :)

Pro-Scapes
04-06-2010, 10:55 AM
I would buy a power one at 500 if someone could recomend one. Ones I have looked at are all north of $1000. I could pay for one right now with the pile I have. I could easily fill a 55 gallon drum with stripped wire and thats packing it down in there.

Mark B
04-07-2010, 11:23 PM
Talking about bringing up the OLD stuff on here. I was reading the first few post on it. Then I saw the date and pages.

Have you tired looking a electrical supply house? The way things are now I would bet you could find a nice used cheap one.

Pro-Scapes
04-08-2010, 09:58 AM
I talked to another friend who hit me on to this.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=300410388835&ssPageName=ADME:X:AAQ:US:1123

For 100 bucks I dont think I can go wrong. I also looked at www.thewirezipper.com too but after talking to my friend who stripped down 400 pounds of copper in a day (not a bad day especially for a rainy day in the shop with a few beverages) I decided to try this machine.

NightScenes
04-09-2010, 12:00 AM
Billy, that thing looks like a pain in the a$$. I use the one that Tommy uses and strip 14 and larger wire, no prob. It's pretty quick.

Pro-Scapes
04-09-2010, 12:04 AM
Same principal as yours ? You still put the wire thru then manually yank it. I did find a power stripper I liked but its pricey.

NightScenes
04-09-2010, 12:16 AM
Yeah but you have to adjust 3 sides for the wire. The one I use, you just turn the top knob to adjust the cutting wheel. It also has a lifetime warranty.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
04-09-2010, 12:58 AM
Paul, what is the make and model of yours?

NightScenes
04-09-2010, 09:57 AM
I use the model A seen here http://www.striptec.com/

RLDesign
04-09-2010, 12:02 PM
Hello All,

I did my last 2 jobs in recycled wire. It is just as easy as working with new wire. We sized out our lengths as we stored them in our warehouse, and we have about 800-1000 lbs. Each job, I have tried to get our crews to use from the pile. We inspect each piece before use, but the process is very easy. I would invest in the stripper, but the recycling into my line of work seems like a normal route. We have been doing this for years. We also use our lighting wire as speaker wire, so sometimes it goes into our audio jobs.

Talk soon.

Tanek
Reynolds Lighting Design

Pro-Scapes
04-09-2010, 07:16 PM
Tanek,

I too find myself using small pieces in the T's and such. Sometimes it can be time consuming finding the right sized piece. Most of what I am planning to recycle is older wire I have yanked out of jobs and pieces less than 10 ft long.

Tim R.
04-09-2010, 08:24 PM
When you are the one paying for the wire, it is amazing how far you can make it go. Ditto on what Billy said for me.

David Gretzmier
04-09-2010, 10:55 PM
I guess I just don't do enough jobs or waste much wire. around the trans I end up with 6-8 strands that are 3 foot long and less. I tend to use those on the next job to do a t or 2 under the trans for the same taps. I also use them on par 36 repair jobs ( not mine ) when you have to move stuff a foot or two here and there. I probably have 200 feet extra laying around at most. most of it is 3-5 foot pieces.

RLDesign
04-10-2010, 10:21 AM
We do not waste wire, but I redo anyones work on an upgrade even if the wire is good. We have many jobs where I have 40 ft or 20 ft left on a roll. The math does not always equal exact lengths. Because we move fast, we place extra wire in a pile until there is enough to use. It has been 3 years since I looked at the bins, but with the economy we started trying to recycle. Because we binned our lengths to sizes, the process has been quite easy. We have some that gets tossed, but just small pieces.

If I need a long run, ACE or Lighting Shrink the run and we are good to go.

Best regards,

Tanek
Reynolds Lighting Design

Pro-Scapes
04-10-2010, 03:35 PM
I disagree with splicing scraps together for installations. If your doing quality work you should not jeapordize the integrity (no pun intended) of your system by placing a splice in there. The client is or should be paying for quality work and not something put together with leftovers.

On a repair for cut cable I would not hessitate to use ace style connectors but on a new installation my client is paying for the best. That doesnt include remnant pieces of cable. I do again use shorter pieces left from previous jobs for T's and such

David Gretzmier
04-10-2010, 05:24 PM
I guess I have recycled some pieces for leads on new work, but it was new wire, not used. I have never added splices or pieced together for runs. but then my pieces tend to be short and a 50 foot run with 15 splices would be insane. But I suppose if I had 20 to 50 50-100 foot sections laying around, and they were new, I would try to use them. when we have 20 foot left on a spool, it is likely that I have a hub 20 foot away from the trans on the next job. we use it.

I think if you are using new wire and you are not increasing the risk of failure on the job, and all our voltages at fixtures are right, then that is not a bad thing.