PDA

View Full Version : Major Brush on Fence Line Question


dgreen67
11-23-2007, 08:26 PM
I did a search for this, but didn't find much. Here is the situation:

There is 550' of fence line (6' tall fencing) that has not been trimmed for at least four years. Small trees have grown through the fence, and vines (weeds, brush, etc.) have grown through and on top of the fence. It looks as though the woods have extened a couple of feet beyond the fence line, and the fence is not even visible in certain parts. I am attempting to attach a picture to show the section I am referring to. In the picture, the fence line is in the right of the picture. You cannot see the fence, but it is there about 2 feet behind the brush!

Can anyone give me any advice (besides a match) to remove the brush? I know there is a lot of hand work, but maybe someone has advice that I haven't thought of.

thanks for any help
Dan

gene gls
11-23-2007, 11:07 PM
I have a brush trimmer that I use a 3 pointed cutting blade for small stuff, up to 1", and for larger brush and small trees I use a " Beaver Blade" on the same trimmer. The Beaver Blade will cut up to 3" trees. Just watch out for rocks, as with any cutting tool, they dull very fast. That will be a time consuming job, espically removing the material that has grown through the fence. There is no easy solution.

ICT Bill
11-24-2007, 12:53 PM
I hope you are bidding it Time and Material. I would include all materials including blades, gas, dump runs and chains on chain saws

A D9 doser maybe and just have them put up a new fence. That would get it done quick

corey4671
11-24-2007, 01:14 PM
couple cans of gas and a match :clapping::dancing:

walls
11-24-2007, 05:21 PM
I cleared a lot this summer with a bobcat with a brush cutter attachment and it worked great, i your case maybe a shredder attachment would be good.

B_gerrits
11-24-2007, 05:46 PM
Wow I hope you have some serious equipment. Bobcat and dump truck if you are removing 550 lineral feet that is a lot of debris. Removing the fence and replacing would be a good size job and cost a lot.

brownsallseasonlandscape
11-24-2007, 06:53 PM
I would have to agree with the bobcat and brushcat attachment or if it is cost prohibtive try a sthil 130R brush cutter with the saw blade attachment it is amazing the one trick is to swing hard through the brush not to use it like a saw use it more like an axe the blades last longer. If time allows use some lesco prosceutor or round-up and kill off the leafy veg. This will help you see your work good luck.

davis45
11-24-2007, 07:02 PM
I just did one of those today, it was almost 1/2 mile, no fence on the inside, they just wanted everything leveled, tree's and all. Figured up fuel cost blades, chain saw oil, etc. then estimate how long the job will take and how many guys will be on it. Luckily he just wanted everything piled up and not hauled off, ended up 5 hours with me and one other guy.

dgreen67
11-24-2007, 10:35 PM
I cleared a lot this summer with a bobcat with a brush cutter attachment and it worked great, i your case maybe a shredder attachment would be good.

If I could rent one of these, and that's a big if, could I use the shredder to near the fence, or would I have to remove it and then shred it?

thanks for everyone's help
Dan

naughty62
11-25-2007, 11:06 AM
Break out the chain saws cut 6 ft. buffer strip .If you can not slice ,dice and let lie .put larger bush over fence,stack in slightly overlapper directional rows.hook a 12 inch chipper to a 3/4 ton and blow it back into the woodline.I do not know how the area is zoned but maybe you could paint a little brush killer on big stumps.If you stack bush correctly it will not take a guy as long as you think to blow the chips back into the wood line.

B_gerrits
11-25-2007, 01:16 PM
From the picture it is hard to give the best plan of attack the bobcat would be great. If you can't get one you could pull out alot of the brush by wrapping a chain around the base of the bush and hooking it to your trailor hitch. I have pulled out tree stumps doing this.

Albery's Lawn & Tractor
11-25-2007, 01:44 PM
Main question is do you have to save the fence? If so, the old fashion chainsaw and brush cutter, I'd stack all the debris, rent a shredder and run all the debris through that. It will take awhile for sure but it depends on what they'll let you do with the fence. Otherwise a chipper on a bobcat would be great and let you take care of it quickly.

maintenanceguy
11-25-2007, 02:57 PM
I think you'll need to cut a buffer strip on the back side of the fence just to allow you access to both sides of the fence to remove all the stuff that's grown into and become one with the fence.

Unless you can cut a 12'+ wide buffer, it all looks like hand work to me. Even if you can run equipment through there to make a lane, you've still got a lot of hand work to do and anything that can pull trees will pull up sections of fence.

This is one of those situations where you plan as best as you can and then end up making it up as you go along because your plan just won't work the way you thought it would.

But my plan would probably be to clear the visible side of the fence enough that I could throw my debris over the fence from the back side once I get there. I'd then work on the backside cutting a 3' wide strip so I cold comfortably walk it and have enough room to swing a chainsaw. My chipper would move along with me and I'd be throwing stuff over the fence to the chipper. Slow going but a nice winter project.

dgreen67
11-25-2007, 11:14 PM
Main question is do you have to save the fence? If so, the old fashion chainsaw and brush cutter, I'd stack all the debris, rent a shredder and run all the debris through that. It will take awhile for sure but it depends on what they'll let you do with the fence. Otherwise a chipper on a bobcat would be great and let you take care of it quickly.

Great idea about the chipper. One question...will a chipper grind up small vines and smaller brush, or will it just grind up 1" and larger type of stuff?

thanks for your input
Dan

dgreen67
11-25-2007, 11:19 PM
I think you'll need to cut a buffer strip on the back side of the fence just to allow you access to both sides of the fence to remove all the stuff that's grown into and become one with the fence.

Unless you can cut a 12'+ wide buffer, it all looks like hand work to me. Even if you can run equipment through there to make a lane, you've still got a lot of hand work to do and anything that can pull trees will pull up sections of fence.

This is one of those situations where you plan as best as you can and then end up making it up as you go along because your plan just won't work the way you thought it would.

But my plan would probably be to clear the visible side of the fence enough that I could throw my debris over the fence from the back side once I get there. I'd then work on the backside cutting a 3' wide strip so I cold comfortably walk it and have enough room to swing a chainsaw. My chipper would move along with me and I'd be throwing stuff over the fence to the chipper. Slow going but a nice winter project.

Great advice, I like your plan...and I am very thankful for this job for the winter time.

thanks for your input
Dan

dgreen67
11-25-2007, 11:24 PM
Break out the chain saws cut 6 ft. buffer strip .If you can not slice ,dice and let lie .put larger bush over fence,stack in slightly overlapper directional rows.hook a 12 inch chipper to a 3/4 ton and blow it back into the woodline.I do not know how the area is zoned but maybe you could paint a little brush killer on big stumps.If you stack bush correctly it will not take a guy as long as you think to blow the chips back into the wood line.

Thanks for your input. When you say 12 inch chipper to 3/4 ton, is that referring to the tractor pulling the chipper?

Dan

dcondon
11-25-2007, 11:41 PM
Chainsaw and chipper is all you will need, O and a little time on your hands.

sildoc
11-26-2007, 12:05 AM
Yeah about a 12 pack of sharp chains and a good chipper. as said before sell them on making a area between the fence and brush. this will allow for easier and cheaper trimming in subsequent years. I am guessing there to be in rental and supplies (chains, fuel, misc parts, gloves, eye protection, ect) to be around 1500. then add about 2-3 weeks of 8-10 hrs and aprox 2 guys.

Plan of attack would be to cut 3-4' swath from fence and chip right onto that area to add an extra layer of keeping brush down and look good also. Total bid with out seeing it for me would be right around 6-8 grand. this is with a little discount due to lack of business and making the wife happy I am out of the house and not annoying her or myself. Remember if it can go wrong it will.

dgreen67
11-26-2007, 09:35 AM
Yeah about a 12 pack of sharp chains and a good chipper. as said before sell them on making a area between the fence and brush. this will allow for easier and cheaper trimming in subsequent years. I am guessing there to be in rental and supplies (chains, fuel, misc parts, gloves, eye protection, ect) to be around 1500. then add about 2-3 weeks of 8-10 hrs and aprox 2 guys.

Plan of attack would be to cut 3-4' swath from fence and chip right onto that area to add an extra layer of keeping brush down and look good also. Total bid with out seeing it for me would be right around 6-8 grand. this is with a little discount due to lack of business and making the wife happy I am out of the house and not annoying her or myself. Remember if it can go wrong it will.

Thank you for your input. I am with you on the amount of time needed and the supplies. Somebody I spoke with (not on this site) said that smaller vines and brush will clog the teeth on a chipper (he said chippers are made for 1" and up type of stuff). Any comments on that?

thanks again
Dan

MarcSmith
11-26-2007, 09:47 AM
if they want to save the fence, you are looking at hand work. chain saws, lopers, brush blades...Once you get in and see the fence it will go a lot faster.


a chipper and a roll off dumpster are not bad ideas either.....A 20 yard rolloff can hold a bunch of chippped debris...

JB1
11-26-2007, 09:51 AM
we had a half mile section like that, after we cleared a very small section, we convinced them to rip it all out and put up new fence which was the best move, and they agreed, it need ed to be really clean as they were weaving security wires through it.

tamadrummer
11-26-2007, 10:03 AM
Sorry to be the pessimist here but if you are not absolutely certain about the ability of the basic equipment needed and its capabilities for this huge undertaking, you will lose your shirt on this job! I have zero experience with stuff like that but I would run to the hills if asked to bid that!

Unless you are working alone and don't have to pay anyone and can take as long as you need without rented equipment costs until you have enough stuff piled up to justify the cost of the rental, your time and materials will truly tear into you.

If you do it, good luck and I hope you are super prosperous and grow!

dgreen67
11-26-2007, 10:17 AM
if they want to save the fence, you are looking at hand work. chain saws, lopers, brush blades...Once you get in and see the fence it will go a lot faster.


a chipper and a roll off dumpster are not bad ideas either.....A 20 yard rolloff can hold a bunch of chippped debris...

Thanks for the advice...yes I need to save the fence. The dumpster is a good idea if I get not put it back into the woods.

thanks again
Dan

MarcSmith
11-26-2007, 10:48 AM
if you can chip it and throw it back into the woods. even better, and its saves you some and them some $$$ in hauling fees...

sildoc
11-26-2007, 11:49 AM
Thank you for your input. I am with you on the amount of time needed and the supplies. Somebody I spoke with (not on this site) said that smaller vines and brush will clog the teeth on a chipper (he said chippers are made for 1" and up type of stuff). Any comments on that?

thanks again
Dan

A lot depends on the vines. Most vines this time of year have lost most of their moisture and as long as you feed them with woody debris your shouldn't have a problem. Put it this way they use these chippers to spread hay to keep hills from sliding.
Good luck.
I know it is a high bid and I guess it is how bad they want it cleared. Give them your actual bid and see their reaction, if they grimmace on that give them a bid for doing the job half assed. This sometimes works for me to get the full price, or I land a job any way scaling it down to only what they want done.
Really try to sell them on saving money in the future not right now.
Next year you can go in and cut back to where you finished this year for ? 1/3 the cost? 1/2?

B_gerrits
11-26-2007, 03:20 PM
The 20 yard debries box great idea, The chipper I wouldn't throw in vines or anything that would break down fiberous(stringy). If you are renting this I would call the rental place and find out what their recommended use and it's limitations . A debris box runs about $350 a pop here. You might try asking the customer if they are open to the idea of using the chipped wood as mulch as this would save them money and help keep down weeds. I would be careful of throwing debris on someones property even if it is city owned. Here if the City or County caught you they would own you. The truck and chain works great on small trees and good size bushes that you have guarntee won't grow back it pulls out their roots.The cost of the chipper would determine it's use on the job because a 20 yrd box can hold a lot of this stuff it is the trees and their branches that eat up space fast. I also would also clear a section of the fence line both sides and inspect it. The last thing you need is to find out the brush and trees are what is holding it up or straight. It would really suck to have the fence lean after removing brush and the customer claim it was your removal that caused the problem.