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View Full Version : Aerating Job (PICS)


02DURAMAX
11-25-2007, 01:27 AM
Here is an aerating job i did today...Its with a Ryan Lawnaire V...some before and after...The white you see on the grass is frost...Sorry for the quality of the pic's its with my phone..

02DURAMAX
11-25-2007, 01:31 AM
Few more.....

rodfather
11-25-2007, 06:59 AM
Nice plugs...I hope you waited for the frost to disappear before aerating.

yardmanlee
11-25-2007, 08:11 AM
Nice plugs...I hope you waited for the frost to disappear before aerating.

same here or I hope it wasent a very heavy frost

EJD Lawnpride
11-25-2007, 11:22 AM
What is the weather like where your at? It's pointless aerating here. People would look at me like I was nuts. However, i did see Scotts still out aerating.

02DURAMAX
11-25-2007, 04:09 PM
It was a very light frost...It was mostly a dew...

beaglegun
11-25-2007, 04:09 PM
The soil on the end of those plugs looks like tar! I wish our soil looked more like that. How deep into the plugs were the roots?

02DURAMAX
11-26-2007, 02:02 AM
Some went about 3/4 of the plug others about 1/2....

turfcobob
11-26-2007, 11:49 AM
EJD Lawnpride, YOu can aerate till it freezes if you like. The soil will move all winter with the freeze and thaw cycles. A late fert app after you aerate will jump start the lawn in the spring. I have done that here in Nebraska and it works.

EagleLandscape
11-26-2007, 12:29 PM
Looks like that customer has alot of dogs...

swim
11-26-2007, 03:23 PM
Nice plugs...I hope you waited for the frost to disappear before aerating.

Ok I will bite. Why do we hope it was not a heavy frost and disappeared before aerating?:confused:

Great plugs by the way. Real good depth.:waving:

BeautifulBlooms
11-26-2007, 03:46 PM
Walking, or in this case aerating over a frost filled lawn will actually damage the turf. If it was really hard frost the patches where the wheels were and the walker's (person) footsteps could actually kill that turf. It breaks apart all of the cellular walls of the grass blades basically cutting off its vascular system. Even if it only is cosmetic (light frost only) it does look bad to your customers, but there also is the chance that the grass plants could be killed by the traffic.

I have killed turf in frost before, but most lawns are resilient enough to bounce back the next spring, but try making sure your customer believes you, it might not be ewasy.

Marcos
11-28-2007, 12:08 PM
Walking, or in this case aerating over a frost filled lawn will actually damage the turf. If it was really hard frost the patches where the wheels were and the walker's (person) footsteps could actually kill that turf. It breaks apart all of the cellular walls of the grass blades basically cutting off its vascular system. Even if it only is cosmetic (light frost only) it does look bad to your customers, but there also is the chance that the grass plants could be killed by the traffic.

I have killed turf in frost before, but most lawns are resilient enough to bounce back the next spring, but try making sure your customer believes you, it might not be ewasy.

Aw Geezz! :hammerhead:

Go read the thread:
'Anyone work on a lawn when it is below freezing' in the 'commercial mowing' forum!
That tells the whole story...

I pleaded my case there (not quite as eloquently as you, I may add :) ), but I found that there's just simply vastly different levels of expectations from area to area, from contractor to contractor, and from customer type to customer type.

And most disturbingly, I suspect things like this that our fathers and grandfathers in the business years ago instinctively knew were damaging, have somehow escaped the general pool of green industry understanding.

loom-gen
11-28-2007, 09:10 PM
I have that same pokey-holler device. It looks like my billy goat. anyways... Depressing the grass when there is a frost won't hurt the crown only the blades so the damage is only cosmetic. It can however look like crap all winter long. I've seen brown lines from a mower on a lawn from november to march. I've never seen turf die completely from this.

BeautifulBlooms
11-28-2007, 09:32 PM
I am not knocking anyone in particular but arent we in the business of making things look good? Sometimes you have to wait to accomplish what you want for someone because the situation isnt ideal. Sometimes you have to work longer hours to get the job done at an appropriate time, or time of year, or get up earlier to get the job done, etc etc etc, the point is we are professionals so because something will look horrible dont do it. Wait until the conditions are good enough to avoid damage to the turf. I agree it isn't easy to actually kill turf in frost, but I have seen negative effects from it. The turf will not be as dense in the spring, allowing more weeds to appear, etc etc etc, why take the risk of actually causing damage, when in the end even if the turf is fine it will look horrible. Everytime I see turf damage from frost, or grass clippings all over the street, or other things like that I would expect a homeowner to cause, I think it looks unprofessional and therefore decreases peoples image of our industry. So many people say my customers dont care!!! That isnt the point you SHOULD care!!!

Just my .02. Replies welcomed and intelligent rebuttles encouraged.

Marcos
11-28-2007, 09:43 PM
I am not knocking anyone in particular but arent we in the business of making things look good? Sometimes you have to wait to accomplish what you want for someone because the situation isnt ideal. Sometimes you have to work longer hours to get the job done at an appropriate time, or time of year, or get up earlier to get the job done, etc etc etc, the point is we are professionals so because something will look horrible dont do it. Wait until the conditions are good enough to avoid damage to the turf. I agree it isn't easy to actually kill turf in frost, but I have seen negative effects from it. The turf will not be as dense in the spring, allowing more weeds to appear, etc etc etc, why take the risk of actually causing damage, when in the end even if the turf is fine it will look horrible. Everytime I see turf damage from frost, or grass clippings all over the street, or other things like that I would expect a homeowner to cause, I think it looks unprofessional and therefore decreases peoples image of our industry. So many people say my customers dont care!!! That isnt the point you SHOULD care!!!

Just my .02. Replies welcomed and intelligent rebuttles encouraged.

Mike & Loriena-
The crying shame is as recent as THREE decades ago you wouldn't have gotten any argument from ANYONE in the business on this issue!
It was just understood common sense.