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INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
12-10-2007, 03:32 PM
29 Nov 2007
LED Lighting Fixtures Inc has built a prototype LED-based PAR 38 lamp that produces 659 lm from 5.8 watts of wall-plug power, with CCT of 2760 K and CRI of 91.2.
At the White LEDs-07 conference in Japan last week, Tony van de Ven of LED Lighting Fixtures, Inc. (LLF) announced a new performance milestone for a prototype LED luminaire, which smashes existing records.
LLF built a prototype PAR 38 self-ballasted lamp, which was tested under steady-state conditions by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Washington, DC.

The LRP-38 lamp set a new standard for energy efficient lighting by producing 659 lumens at a mere 5.8 watts of wall-plug power, resulting in 113.6 delivered lumens per watt.

The lamp emitted a warm incandescent-like color of 2760 Kelvin with a superb color rendering index of 91.2.

The LLF lamp would use less than 9% and 30% of the energy consumed by incandescent and fluorescent sources, respectively. Gerry Negley, LLF’s Chief Technology Officer said, “The results of this prototype clearly demonstrate that LLF’s LED technology will surpass all existing forms of lighting in terms of performance."

At the conference, van de Ven, LLF’s Hong Kong Managing Director, described the company's proprietary method to obtain simultaneously very high efficacy and color rendering. The PAR 38 fixture uses blue-shifted yellow Cree Xlamp LEDs in combination with red Golden Dragon LEDs from Osram Opto Semiconductors.

Van de Ven said, “We are very encouraged by our LRP-38 technology demonstration, as it is clearly the most energy efficient, high CRI white lighting solution ever developed. While there is currently no timetable for a production release, this result shows that LLF’s technology with LED light sources has the ability to surpass 100 lumens per watt from a fixture, which is a revolutionary milestone for significant world-wide energy savings.”

JoeyD
12-11-2007, 10:33 AM
GE engineer states that they are about 10 years away from a long lasting, tested, and reliable LED for LANDSCAPE LIGHTING. We like all of our competition do not make light bulbs so this is another reason why we will work with GE (light Bulb EXPERTS) on LED's.

We spoke to this engineer by telephone last week.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
12-11-2007, 01:36 PM
Joey, I will put $100 Canadian funds down right now that says GE will have a LED light source suitable for installation and use in landscape lighting applications before the year 2018.

Are you up for it?

JoeyD
12-11-2007, 01:57 PM
James you know 100 candian dollars is like 5 million US dollars, I cant afford that bet. But I can say that I do not lie so unless you are calling the GE engineer one then..........

I only am relaying what he told us my friend. I have never claimed to be an LED expert nor a lamp expert only a guy who likes to know and visually see the facts.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
12-11-2007, 02:15 PM
James you know 100 candian dollars is like 5 million US dollars, I cant afford that bet. But I can say that I do not lie so unless you are calling the GE engineer one then..........

I only am relaying what he told us my friend. I have never claimed to be an LED expert nor a lamp expert only a guy who likes to know and visually see the facts.

Aww come on Joey, that was a good bet! :)

Tuesday, December 11, 2007
100 Canadian Dollar = 99.41643 US Dollar
100 US Dollar (USD) = 100.587 Canadian Dollar (CAD

You have a direct line of information and I am only guessing! The odds are in your favour, wouldn't you say?

And no, I was not calling anyone anything... just a good ole fashioned wager.

I base my bet on the following: With the technological advances that LEDs have been making recently, and the overwhelming focus on this technology by most segments of the lighting industry, I cannot see how or why it will take 10 years for a world leading manufacturer such as GE to come up with a viable solution for the outdoor lighting industry.

Two years ago, Bill Locklin had some proprietary GE LEDs installed into a variety of Nightscaping fixtures that he showcased to his inner circle of friends. They were not ready for market in this application, but they were effective! Just this summer GE launched a whole new line of miniature, power LEDs that looked very viable for use in our industry. I will look up this info and post it here for all to see. I was planning on purchasing some of these this winter and installing them into various fixtures as a test of their new format and technology. I will let you know how this goes...

Take the bet Joey... it will be fun.

JoeyD
12-11-2007, 02:33 PM
No bet here James, you know far more then I do on this subject. Maybe the engineer we spoke to is out of his wits but I doubt it. He did not say they wouldnt have A LED product they just said there wouldnt be a solid, tested, LED for LANDSCAPE LIGHTING. I think that everyone including the outdoor lighting manufacturers are just so excited about LED that they are jumping the gun with them right now. But that is how things get figured out!!! This guy was pretty specific in what he told us and for now I will stick with what the GE engineer said. If he or we are wrong on this it will be our loss but I think we are pretty confident as are a lot of others in this indutry that LED still has quite a ways to go before they are proven to hold up in the outdoor lighting/landscape lighting environment.

But hey lets see it! I am all for progression. The minute I can throw a life time warranty on an LED fixture I will be all over it!!!

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
12-12-2007, 01:48 AM
Here is the information on the new GE LED I was looking at...

http://www.lumination.com/product.php?id=56

It really has some awesome properties. Now to match it up with a power management circuit to deliver its specific needs. This is where the asian lamp manufacturers have a leg up on America...

The big lighting companies are not producing the 'whole package' yet when it comes to LEDs. Instead they are focused on building the emmiters, the engines, the phosphors, the collimators or the power management components. It would appear that neither GE, Osram, Phillips, Cree, etc etc have put much effort into a total LED lamp product to be delivered across the shop counter. They are acting like OEM suppliers in the auto sector. This leaves offshore companies to buy up all the components and build a working LED lamp module.

I would suspect that soon, the big lamp manufacturers will see the market for building a complete LED lamp unit. They are certainly missing the boat at this stage. Almost all of the complete LED lamp modules I have tested have been produced in Asia. (Korea, Taiwan, China for the most part) but they make use of big name components like Cree, Luxeon, etc

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
12-12-2007, 02:00 AM
For those who want to stay up to date, I would highly recommend you subscribe to LEDs Magazine. It is online and free.

www.ledsmagazine.com

Have a great day.

JoeyD
12-12-2007, 10:54 AM
Here is the information on the new GE LED I was looking at...

http://www.lumination.com/product.php?id=56

It really has some awesome properties. Now to match it up with a power management circuit to deliver its specific needs. This is where the asian lamp manufacturers have a leg up on America...

The big lighting companies are not producing the 'whole package' yet when it comes to LEDs. Instead they are focused on building the emmiters, the engines, the phosphors, the collimators or the power management components. It would appear that neither GE, Osram, Phillips, Cree, etc etc have put much effort into a total LED lamp product to be delivered across the shop counter. They are acting like OEM suppliers in the auto sector. This leaves offshore companies to buy up all the components and build a working LED lamp module.

I would suspect that soon, the big lamp manufacturers will see the market for building a complete LED lamp unit. They are certainly missing the boat at this stage. Almost all of the complete LED lamp modules I have tested have been produced in Asia. (Korea, Taiwan, China for the most part) but they make use of big name components like Cree, Luxeon, etc

You just bassicly said what the GE guy said James. They are not ready to deliver a product that they can firmly say will hold up in the landscape environment!

pcrispy
12-13-2007, 02:26 PM
I have a 3w single Cree LED flashlight that blows the heck out of my 35w 24˚ lights. Similar properties in terms of beam spread but WAY brighter when you put them side to side. Granted my flashlight is on the evil blue side but you could gel it and still blow the pants off of a 35w Ushio or Cast 10,000 hour bulb. LEDs are much closer than what a lot of people want to believe, maybe because it will severely cut into maintenance charges? Who knows. Using a quick google search, I found this link to a place that is making MR16 drop-ins:

http://www.ledshoponline.com/high_power_mr16_led_10deg.htm

I am sure that there are tons of other people getting ready to come out with similar stuff and probably in the 3200k range very soon. I used to be an LED hater too but when you see the power that they now have compared to the amount of electrical savings, a homeowner would be crazy to not have interest in them.

irrig8r
12-13-2007, 03:58 PM
I think there are still a number of challenges in a landscape environment, notably moisture intrusion/ condensation and dissipation of heat.

For example- it would seem to me that a fixture material that does a good job of dissipating heat might also cool down fast enough where condensation and expansion/ contraction around seals would be an issue too.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
12-13-2007, 04:49 PM
I think there are still a number of challenges in a landscape environment, notably moisture intrusion/ condensation and dissipation of heat.

For example- it would seem to me that a fixture material that does a good job of dissipating heat might also cool down fast enough where condensation and expansion/ contraction around seals would be an issue too.

To some degree you are correct Gregg... Heat dissipation is essential as is moisture sealing / air sealing. I have yet to find a MR16 LED module that is completely sealed to the outside environment. You have to be careful of what fixtures you install them into for these reasons.

So far so good on this end though...

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
12-13-2007, 04:58 PM
I have a 3w single Cree LED flashlight that blows the heck out of my 35w 24˚ lights. Similar properties in terms of beam spread but WAY brighter when you put them side to side. Granted my flashlight is on the evil blue side but you could gel it and still blow the pants off of a 35w Ushio or Cast 10,000 hour bulb. LEDs are much closer than what a lot of people want to believe, maybe because it will severely cut into maintenance charges? Who knows. Using a quick google search, I found this link to a place that is making MR16 drop-ins:

http://www.ledshoponline.com/high_power_mr16_led_10deg.htm

I am sure that there are tons of other people getting ready to come out with similar stuff and probably in the 3200k range very soon. I used to be an LED hater too but when you see the power that they now have compared to the amount of electrical savings, a homeowner would be crazy to not have interest in them.

There are dozens of MR16 LED lamp modules on the market now. You have to be very careful when comparing them though.....

The most important factors are colour temperature, intensity (output, measured in Lm - Lumen Meters in the case of these lamps) and beam spread. Many of the lamp manufactures make wild claims on paper that cannot be supported when it comes to real life testing.

The units I have found and am using are 3200K (warm white) and produce 216-220 Lm output at about 40deg spread. They mimic a BAB 20W Halogen very closely. I have tested numerous others and have not yet found one LED MR16 lamp that has a warm white light as well as the output of a 35w Halogen. I have seen some that are 4000+K with a 10deg spread that you might argue are as bright as a 35w Halogen, but it is not a very useable format for our purposes.

I am currently in negotiations with a couple of different lamp manufacturers to build an LED MR16 module to my specifications... but it could be a slow process.

Have a great day

pcrispy
12-14-2007, 08:15 AM
Which LED units are you currently using? I thought that I read where you said that they were complete units and not drop-in bulbs. Is that correct?

Thanks.

Frog Lights, LLC
12-14-2007, 12:51 PM
Our factory does a lot with LED's. We can build most projects that are needed to your specifications. I have in inventory replacement LED MR 16's right now in cool white. We are also sub contracting presently for some other major corporations.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
12-14-2007, 02:29 PM
Which LED units are you currently using? I thought that I read where you said that they were complete units and not drop-in bulbs. Is that correct?

Thanks.

I am using a 3x3watt (actually draws 6.15w - go figure) 3200K, 216Lm, 40deg. LED MR16 Lamp Module. So yes, it is a "drop in" replacement lamp that is pretty much identical to a 20W BAB Halogen MR16.

I am not a fan of factory sealed complete units (sealed fixtures with LED lamps) for reason stated previously.

LandArts
12-14-2007, 03:09 PM
If you would share the source I'd like to try them.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
12-14-2007, 03:21 PM
Sourcing and procurement of these lamps has been a real issue for me this past year. The supply chain is currently WAY too long and I am working at resolving this.

When I have my supply guaranteed, I will happily share with you all where I have been purchasing them from. In the mean time, I will be making them available on my new retail website when that launches (date TBD, but hopefully by spring at this point)

I am also in the midst of having an LED lamp module produced to my specification.... this endeavour promises to be lengthy however.

Sorry that I cannot be more helpful at this time... but the last thing I need is to have the only place I know of being swamped with purchase orders for these lamps, and then leaving large lead times to fill my orders. Some might think this selfish, but it is just business.

Have a great day.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
12-20-2007, 06:00 PM
Those working at the forefront of LED technology know that LEDs are certain to become one of the light source choices for general illumination. Over the next few years, we can expect to see an increasing number of LED luminaires in the marketplace. Already today we are seeing LED luminaires challenging traditional light sources in several general and niche lighting applications.
LED device manufacturers have to be commended for their persistence in improving white LED performance over the last decade. The year 2007 may be when LEDs began to seriously take on traditional light sources in general lighting applications. Downlighting and street/parking lot lighting are two applications for which several manufacturers have released LED products to compete with traditional lighting.

However, as with many traditional luminaires, not all LED-based luminaires provide reliable performance. While the LED itself may have good quality and performance as a bare device, its integration into a luminaire and that luminaire’s installation environment are key to the final product performance and whether it will stand up to customer expectations. Luminaires that do not meet customer expectations can turn off users from promising LED technology.

So, the questions become:
- How do we differentiate product performance in terms of life and light output?
- How can we keep the market transformation of LED technology from facing early setbacks?
The answers to these questions may rest upon changing the tradition of photometry as we know it today.

Traditional testing

Those knowledgeable in lighting use photometric data to select and use suitable luminaires. Traditionally, photometric testing of light sources and luminaires is performed at an ambient temperature of 25°C. This temperature typically is measured at a position up to 1 meter away from the light source or luminaire and at the same height as the midpoint of the light source or luminaire (e.g. IESNA LM-9-99; "IESNA Approved Method for the Electrical and Photometric Measurements of Fluorescent Lamps" published 1999 by the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America).

Photometric data collected according to such testing standards have been useful for selecting and specifying technologies, such as incandescent, whose performances are not affected by the ambient temperature surrounding the light source. However, such data are not very useful for LED technologies, which can show radically different photometric performance and life when used in different application environments. Selecting LED downlights for an application on the basis of published photometric data could result in considerably lower light levels in the space than designed, leading to disappointment.

Temperature affects LEDs

In an LED, the temperature of the junction between the semiconductor’s light-producing layers (p and n materials) is known to be good predictor of performance. The junction temperature depends on the drive current supplied to the LED and the application environment where the light source or luminaire is installed.

Usually, a lighting system can experience different thermal environments depending on where it is installed in the application. To obtain realistic performance data for a lighting system, the test environment must mimic the actual environment where the luminaire would be used. To address this concern, in 2006 researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s Lighting Research Center (LRC), together with sponsors of the Alliance for Solid-State Illumination Systems and Technologies (ASSIST), recommended the creation of three environmental conditions to test the performance of directional lighting systems (e.g., downlights and track heads) that are applicable to any light source and address the specific concerns of LED systems.

These recommended testing conditions were based on the typical operating environments of indoor lighting systems. These testing conditions were described and published in ASSIST recommends. . . Recommendations for testing and evaluating luminaires used in directional lighting, which is available on the LRC website.

Test environments

The test environments proposed by the LRC and ASSIST are open air, semi-ventilated, and enclosed. In the case of open air, the light source and the current driver have plenty of ventilation around them for convection heat transfer. Convection heat transfer is important for LEDs because they do not radiate heat out from the source like incandescent lamps do. The open-air testing condition is most similar to the traditional photometric testing environment.

In the next environment, semi-ventilated, the light source and the driver have limited ventilation around them for convection heat transfer. In enclosed environments, the light source and the driver have almost no ventilation around them for convection heat transfer. As an example, in practice these three environments can be thought of as luminaires operating in a suspended track lighting system, as recessed downlights in non-insulated ceilings, and as recessed downlights in insulated ceilings, respectively. (See endnote 1 - "Recommended luminaire testing environments" for more information.)

In general, the three testing environments and recommended test methods published in "ASSIST recommends" were designed to:
-- Provide more useful information for selecting and using LED directional lighting
-- Help differentiate between good and poor performing LED luminaires in terms of light output and life
-- Simplifiy and improve photometric data accuracy by controlling the board temperature of LED luminaires with a smaller volume test chamber instead of controlling the ambient temperature of the room while gathering data.

To understand more clearly how LED luminaire performance varies under the three environmental conditions, the LRC began testing commercial LED downlight luminaires according to ASSIST’s recommendations. The LED downlights selected for testing were IC-rated. These luminaires were mounted and operated in the three different testing environments (open air, semi-ventilated, and enclosed) per ASSIST recommends.

Testing methodology

A temperature sensor was attached to the LED circuit board of each downlight to measure the board temperature of the luminaires while operating in the testing environments. After an initial 100-hour seasoning period, the LED downlights were turned on and allowed to stabilize for 24 hours. The board temperature values for the three testing environments were then measured to obtain baseline temperature data for the luminaires. From the board temperature, the LED junction temperature could be estimated.

Next, the LED downlights were mounted inside a specially designed heated chamber that maintained the same board temperatures found previously. The board temperatures were monitored and maintained throughout the test period via a feedback control circuit that provided a signal to a supplemental heater built inside the chamber. This procedure ensured that the LED junction temperature remained equal to what it would be if the LED downlights were mounted in an actual application.

An integrating sphere with an optical spectrometer attached to one of the ports was placed below the LED system, as shown in the photo of the downlight test rack (Figure 1). Light output from the LED downlights entered the integrating sphere through an entrance port large enough to accept most of the flux. At regular intervals, the integrating sphere was positioned under each of the LED downlights and measurements were taken for light output and spectrum.

The use of the integrating sphere ensured good mixing of light output to obtain average values for flux and color. Generally, the spatial distribution of light level and color of an LED luminaire beam is non-uniform and therefore can lead to large measurement errors if the detector sees only a portion of the beam.

Test results


Figure 2a
The two parts of Figure 2 illustrate measured performance data for two commercial LED downlight products: a 26-watt dedicated LED downlight luminaire and a 12-watt LED retrofit system inside an incandescent-based downlight. These two sample data were selected to illustrate the performance of a not-so-good LED luminaire product and a good LED luminaire product, respectively.


Figure 2b
Figure 2a shows that the light output of the 26-watt LED product differs radically in each of the three testing environments. On the other hand, the 12-watt product (Figure 2b) provided very similar light output in all three environments. The measured board temperatures in the three environments (open air, semi-ventilated, and enclosed) were 87°C, 107°C, and 119°C, respectively, for the 26-watt product; and 42ºC, 50ºC, and 60ºC, respectively, for the 12-watt product.

Lifetime results


Figure 3a
Figure 3 illustrates the relative light output over time for the 26-watt and 12-watt LED downlights in the three testing environments. Lumen maintenance is an important performance metric for luminaires. For LEDs, the light output decreases over time and at some point the light level is no longer sufficient for the application. At this point, the light source or luminaire is considered to be at the end of its useful life and should be replaced.

ASSIST defines LED life by the time, in hours, that it takes for a light source or system to reach 70% of its initial light output (L70). (For more information about ASSIST’s definition of LED life, see http://www.lrc.rpi.edu/programs/solidstate/assist/ledlife.asp.)

In terms of expected life for the 26-watt LED downlight (figure 3a), even though the number of hours for data collection is still very low, extrapolated data indicate that this downlight will reach its end of life, L70, within 2100 hours for an enclosed application, 2650 hours for a semi-ventilated application, and 5000 hours if placed in open air with plenty of ventilation.


Figure 3b
These expected life figures are much shorter than the 40,000–50,000 hours published by the manufacturer. Such a short useful life is due to high temperatures at the LED junction. On the other hand, the 12-watt downlight product (figure 3b) has not shown any appreciable diminishing of light output to date because the junction temperatures are much lower.

Outcomes

To illustrate the point, if one were looking for a 600-lumen downlight luminaire for a residential application with insulated ceilings, both luminaires considered here would have qualified based on their published photometric data, measured according to traditional practice. However, the 26-watt downlight product would have led to disappointment on two fronts, initially with a 30% lower light level in the space and in the longer term with frequent replacement due to a much shorter life than advertised.

The testing data reported here illustrate why photometric data produced according to traditional testing standards are not very useful for LED luminaires. LEDs have great potential to provide customized, dynamic, and energy-saving illumination—if the technology can be presented using relevant and meaningful photometric data and installed in optimal applications.

Changing traditions by testing and reporting data per ASSIST recommends will assist end-users in selecting appropriate LED luminaires by providing more useful information. In turn, this can help set the right expectations and ultimately lead LED technology to widespread acceptance and use.

Endnote 1 - Recommended luminaire testing environments

The three recommended testing environments described cover the typical indoor applications of directional lighting. These conditions provide a range that allows users to estimate the performance of a downlight in any application condition if the specific operating board temperature is known. If a particular application falls outside of the temperature range of the three recommended environments, the same principle for testing can be applied:
1) Install the luminaire in a way that is representative of the actual application
2) Allow the light source to stabilize and measure the board temperature (for LEDs) or other point known to have a direct relationship with the performance of the light source (e.g. the cold spot for fluorescent lamps)
3) Test the luminaire photometrically and electrically at the same board temperature found in the previous step

One of the advantages of the three testing environments as described by ASSIST recommends is the use of small testing chambers to control more precisely the temperature, as opposed to controlling the room’s ambient temperature as is typically done with traditional photometry. Additionally, the point where the temperature is monitored is defined unequivocally because of its location within the luminaire rather than in the ambient environment.

Endnote 2 - Alliance for Solid-State Illumination Systems and Technologies (ASSIST)

ASSIST was established in 2002 by the Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY as a collaboration between academic researchers, manufacturers, and government organizations, ASSIST’s goal is to facilitate the broad adoption and effective use of reliable, energy-efficient solid-state lighting and to speed its market acceptance. ASSIST is active in a number of research projects and other activities to advance and promote LED technology. Research, education, and industry collaboration have been the key activities of the program, which seeks to reduce many of the technical hurdles standing between LEDs and their market acceptance.

As part of these activities, ASSIST has developed a publication program called ASSIST recommends to provide a set of formal recommendations to the LED and lighting communities about issues important for the reliable performance of LED lighting and its comparison to other light source technologies. The publications include recommendations for LED life definition, testing and measurement, best practice guides for different lighting applications, and recommendations for selecting LED lighting. These publications are developed under the guidance of ASSIST sponsors using research conducted by the LRC.

Each ASSIST recommends publication undergoes internal review, first by LRC researchers and then by ASSIST sponsors. Industry input also is gathered during the writing process through one or more roundtable sessions hosted by ASSIST and the LRC. Based upon this industry input, the publications are revised and then published electronically for free download (ASSIST recommends). As warranted, the publications are updated from time to time to reflect new research, technologies, methods, and equipment.

ASSIST recommends is sponsored by Cree; Federal Aviation Administration (FAA); Lite-On; GE Lumination (formerly GELcore); New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA); Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance; Osram Sylvania; Philips Lighting/Color Kinetics, now Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions; Photonics Cluster (UK)/The Lighting Association; Seoul Semiconductor; and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

David Gretzmier
12-22-2007, 01:58 AM
The above post may hold the record for the longest post in lawnsite history.

The recent energy bill passed by congress mandates an increase in efficiency on lightbulbs to 70% better than incandecents than they are now by 2020. compact fluorescents and led bulbs already meet that standard. by the mere fact that 100 watt incandecent all the way down to 40 watt bulbs will no longer be sold, the development money is going to go to LEDs. I'd say that in 3 years our asian friends will have beaten most of the early problems they are having now, and there will be some really good choices out there in the LED landscape light department. within one year, I'll bet there is one or two choices out there for folks willing to roll the dice.

Look at Christmas lights. LED's are proliferating, and I used them this year in a multi-color ceramic c-9 retrofit. you cannot tell the difference between LED and incandecent in this application. sure, there are still some old style LEDS that vibrate your pupils out there. but some you don't notice are already LED. If it is here now, in several areas, folks won't wait on GE to come up with it in 10 years.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
02-07-2008, 05:47 PM
Acriche attains higher luminance efficacy of 80 lm/W

Date Announced: 07 Feb 2008

SEOUL, KOREA –– Seoul Semiconductor, one of the world’s leading manufacturers, announced today that it has succeeded in raising the efficiency of Acriche, the world’s first AC-driven semiconductor lighting source, to 80 lm/W.

Seoul Semiconductor has made significant strides in a short time to improve and raise the level of performance of Acriche, the world’s first semiconductor lighting source that can be directly connected to 110 volt or 220 volt AC outlets without the need for an AC-DC converter.

In November 2006, Seoul Semiconductor began mass producing Acriche with luminance efficacy of 40 lm/W. By the second quarter of 2007, Seoul Semiconductor was securing large volume sales for Acriche. In September 2007, Seoul Semiconductor’s researchers improved Acriche’s performance to 60 lm/W.

Acriche is also the world’s first LED package to receive the CE Marking, a notable global mark of safety. The LED light source also conforms to the stringent German TUV certification. These achievements coupled with the improved performance at 80 lm/W sets the stage or Acriche’s success in the world markets. Seoul Semiconductor is expecting increasing demand of Acriche worldwide.

DC-driven LEDs have many disadvantages. While the lifespan of DC-driven LED sold in the market is 50,000 to 100,000 hours, the AC-DC converter needed for its application to lighting fixtures only has a lifespan of 20,000 hours. The need to change the AC-DC converter several times over the life of the LED is a major shortcoming of DC-driving LED technology, and limits it appeal for lighting fixtures. AC/DC converters have several other problems including:
• AC/DC converters add extra cost and require more space.
• Design difficulties to accommodate space and thermal dissipation requirements for DC-LEDs make it less viable as a replacement for conventional incandescent bulbs or building structure lighting
• Waste materials from the converter causes environmental pollution
• 80% efficiency of converter causes 20% of electricity loss
• When applied to a small or enclosed area the LED and the AC/DC converter interaction can accumulate to massive heat causing a reduction in lifespan
• Overheating can cause a fire concern which will require safety plans

The technological advancement, innovation and mass production of Acriche make the technology an ideal solution that addresses the problems associated with AC/DC converters.

Since November 2006, Seoul Semiconductor’s success at increasing Acriche’s efficiency levels, reliability and performance, and reducing complexity, has accelerated the industry’s adoption of the technology. At the super brightness of 80 lm/W, Acriche is now almost as bright as conventional DC LEDs.

“Acriche has been developed only for a few years, which is much less than the 20 years of history of DC LEDs. That is to say, it is a newly developed “Young Technology” which has a great potential to grow.

Seoul Semiconductor has invested tens of millions of dollars in research and development, and more than $100 million to develop mass production technology for Acriche. This has led to hundreds of patents which Seoul Semiconductor has registered all around the world to secure recognition for the technology,” said Sang Min Lee, the head of Seoul Semiconductor’s R&D center.

In the past few years, Seoul Semiconductor has introduced some of the most innovative LED chips, core components of LED products in the industry. These advancements are a testimony of the success of Seoul Semiconductor’s R&D strategy where more than 100 talented researchers and engineers develop and research LED chips with some of the world’s most prestigious scientific institutions. This includes a cooperative arrangement with the University of California at Santa Barbara, a leading LED research institution with prominent researchers including Shuji Nakamura, the brilliant inventor of the first blue LED mass-production.

In addition, Seoul Semiconductor has put their resources into developing LED packages cooperatively with many strategic partners. As a result, it has 1,400 their own patents as of December, 2007, and has purchased or acquired 300 patents and licenses through M&A. These patents and licenses account for approximately 10 percent of the total LED-related patents filed throughout the world, which enables Seoul Semiconductor to be the global leader in LED industry.

About Seoul Semiconductor
Seoul Semiconductor, the world’s leading LED manufacturer, has been named to Forbes and Business Weeks lists as one of the most promising Asian companies. Its product, Acriche, was recently named as "Product of the Year 2006" by Elektronik, one of the most prestigious electronics magazines in Europe. Seoul Semiconductor’s primary business areas are LED packaging and custom module manufacturing. It provides a full range of LED products including AC-driven semiconductor light source, Acriche, High-brightness Power, Side View, Top, Chip, Lamp and High Flux LEDs, and custom type modules. Applications for the company’s LED products include general lighting, signage, back lighting for mobile phones, TVs, notebook computers, automotive lighting, home appliances, signals, etc. Seoul Semiconductor reported US$266 million in sales in 2007. It has 1,443 patents and 264 licenses as of December, 2007. Seoul Semiconductor has 18 branches including 3 overseas corporate offices. Its products are also represented worldwide by more than 90 distributors.

Mike M
02-07-2008, 07:26 PM
James,

Please, scale back on "copy and paste." :)

Personally, I really do appreciate reading key quotes and summaries, or some sentences/small paragraphs. You can refer us to complete articles on the primary resource level, which is the best way to get information, especially on the net.

By the way, I'm loving the LED energy, thanks for sharing, but don't try to steal my title.

Michael Murphy
LED Maverick :gunsfirin
Island Lightscapes
Bluffton, South Carolina

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-06-2008, 08:23 PM
26 Feb 2008
The new Z-Power P7 Series single LED package has significantly higher light output than a 60 W incandescent lamp.

Seoul Semiconductor, the leading LED manufacturer in Korea, has announced the commercial release of its ultra bright Z-Power P7 Series LED, and says that it has started producing the device in volume quantities.
Seoul claims that the Z-Power P7 Series delivers "the world’s highest brightness" of 900 lumens at 10 watt (lumens is actually the unit for luminous flux, while brightness is measured in nit or cd/m2 and takes into account the emitting area).

Seoul's data sheet for the P7 shows that the typical flux is 700 lm, while 900 lm is the maximum value. This puts the typical efficacy at around 70 lm/W. The color temperature is 6300K and the color rendering index (Ra) is 70.

Even so, 700 lm from a single P7 package is impressive. A close look at the photo reveals four chips inside the package. The data sheet gives the total current as 2.8 A, with forward voltage of 3.6 V, so we assume each chip is driven at 700 mA (or around 2.5 W).

When the device is driven at 1400 mA (forward voltage = 3.3 V), or 350 mA per chip, the typical output is 400 lm, corresponding to around 86 lm/W.

In comparison with a 60 W incandescent lamp producing 660 lm with an efficacy of 11 lm/W, the 10W P7 single LED package produces a maximum of 900 lm with much higher efficacy of 90 lm/W. Of course, the LED performance data is measured instantaneously at room temperature, while in a real world application the temperature would be higher and the light output lower.

The P7 also performs well in comparison with compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) that consume typically 15 watts and emit 924 lumens, with an efficacy of 62 lm/W.

Seoul also says that the directionality of light emission from an LED lamp also creates an additional advantage compared with fluorescent and incandescent lamps. The company says that when the ability of an LED system to focus light on an application can result in an even greater efficacy advantage compared with conventional light sources.

Seoul Semiconductor says that its Z-Power P7 Series can be applied in many fields such as general residential lighting, streetlights, a variety of task lights, high-end flashlights for military, police or rugged use, and landscape lighting requiring extremely bright light.

“Development of the 900 lumens, 90 lm/W P7 Series is a milestone achievement that reinforces Seoul Semiconductor’s leadership position in the global LED industry,” said Hyuk Won Kwon, a general director of Seoul Semiconductor’s power LED business department. "We will develop new ultra high power products emitting over 1,000 lumens during the third quarter of this year to consolidate and continue advancing our technology.”

Mike M
03-06-2008, 11:08 PM
James, you're the cut-n-paste maniac.

I read recently a little tip on posting etiquete, can't remember the exact ratio, but something to the effect of your quote not being larger than your own written expression/contribution.

Anyways, an interesting observation I've made recently... The South Koreans, and not Americans or Chinese, are the LED masters!

By the way, I have a nice set of 13 LED fixtures and will be getting 9v terminals to solder to the leads. The easiest demo set ever.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-06-2008, 11:18 PM
Mike.... its a forum... the thread is about LEDs in the news.... the information presented is technical in nature.... so ya, its going to be a bit long.

I figure someone has to keep the dinosaurs up to date as to their future demise! :laugh: (yes, that was humour)

I have found a new, and really quite impressive LED MR16 lamp. It's output will be really awesome for doing broad, soft moonlighting and also for soft flood techniques. Thankfully it's colour temperature is identical to the other LED Lamp I use... so now we are assembling a wider variety of sources, capable of more techniques.

Should be an interesting season....

Go Halogen
03-12-2008, 12:21 AM
James (.A.K.A. Roger Moore),

Whoa Nellie! Too much info....Nice of you to give your time to such grand posts, but I do think it is a bit much. If the warm K2 LEDs are not readily available, why even bring them up? You have issues with your supplier?

C'mon dude. We need valid info.

-Andy

David Gretzmier
03-12-2008, 01:27 AM
The cut and paste is fine with me, But I like press releases that talk about products they are gonna sell tomorrow, rather than stuff they cooked up in the lab that works. I frequent the candlepowerforums on flashlights and they have talks about the LED's that are out there right now in labs that will blow your mind. LED's are coming, and some are here for some places, but it is still a roll of the dice.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-12-2008, 08:46 AM
I will have some specific data for you very soon on a very new, very awesome, LINE of LED lamps that are going to make waves. I have the samples here at my shop now. Production has just begun this past week. The product is very well thought out, very well engineered, and produced by a large well respected manufacturer. Packaging is in place, pricing is being developed as we speak. AND this line has been engineered to, (and will will work with), both magnetic and electronic transformers....an industry first.

Stay Tuned... the hard data is coming.

pete scalia
03-12-2008, 07:58 PM
I haven't seen this much hype and illusion since David Copperfield made the statue of liberty disappear on live TV some yrs ago.

irrig8r
03-12-2008, 09:32 PM
I will have some specific data for you very soon on a very new, very awesome, LINE of LED lamps that are going to make waves. I have the samples here at my shop now. Production has just begun this past week. The product is very well thought out, very well engineered, and produced by a large well respected manufacturer. Packaging is in place, pricing is being developed as we speak. AND this line has been engineered to, (and will will work with), both magnetic and electronic transformers....an industry first.

Stay Tuned... the hard data is coming.


So.. these have beeen tested for outdoor use?
Or are you going to be the guinea pig?

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-12-2008, 09:52 PM
So.. these have beeen tested for outdoor use?
Or are you going to be the guinea pig?

Gregg... lets put it this way: The manufacturer is not specifically limiting their application to interior use, like pretty much every other LED MR16 lamp we have seen produced to date.

Would I install them in leaky, moisture filled, open to the air landscape lighting fixtures? No I won't be doing that as they still have on board electronics to consider. I will not hesitate to install these into a top quality sealed fixture or an IP 66 to 68 rated outdoor fixture. The body design is greatly improved when it comes to encasing the on board electronics, and moving these away from the actual LEDs, thus protecting them from the heat

The other very cool (pardon the pun) thing about these new LED lamps is that they are operating at a full 30 deg C. cooler temperature then the 'old' LED lamps I was using. This is due to a much more robust heat sink design and the use of new tech. engines.

I will provide full specs and cut sheets in short order. Units will be available either through my company or through an agent in the USA, probably stocked by early to mid April.

Have a great day.

JoeyD
03-13-2008, 10:42 AM
So James are you telling me that the last LED you were selling us all on is inferior? I mention this not just to call you out but to make a point that this is whats wrong with this whole LED push, you dont know what or who to believe becuase everyone has the holy grail if you will of LED's. I need to see proof, I need to see entire jobs installed for a period of time, I want to see actual used products in the field before I belive that anyones LED is all they pump it up to be. Anyone else feel this way?

By the way has anyone had the time or ability to install a DG Light? I know a few of you were going to try them out and I am curious as to the results. They looked pretty good.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-13-2008, 05:01 PM
So James are you telling me that the last LED you were selling us all on is inferior? I mention this not just to call you out but to make a point that this is whats wrong with this whole LED push, you don't know what or who to believe because everyone has the holy grail if you will of LED's. I need to see proof, I need to see entire jobs installed for a period of time, I want to see actual used products in the field before I believe that any ones LED is all they pump it up to be. Anyone else feel this way

Joey, If a new model vehicle comes with an updated drive-line does it make the last years model inferior or obsolete? Of course not. Surely you have enough experience with technology to understand that advancements are always forthcoming.

If we all shared your apprehension / fears then nobody would be using any new technology and there would be no demand for advancement.

Were you this apprehensive to adopt xenon lamp technology? Or is that just 'low tech' enough that it did not worry you?

I have entire jobs that have been installed using LED lamps... They are working just fine thank you. Just because I have a new and improved lamp available does not mean that last years product is inferior. I would not have installed any if it was not effective and the clients did not want it. I do the research, I do the testing, I provide the information and options, the clients make the purchase decisions. There is nothing underhanded in this at all.

Thankfully I have many early adopter clients who want the "latest and greatest". Many specifically ask for it.

Cheer up Joey :dancing: some day you will be promoting LEDs too.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-13-2008, 05:07 PM
Hey Joey... get this "scary" thought: There is a Canadian :canadaflag: manufacturer that has developed a LED MR16 that matches the intensity, colour and beam pattern of an FMW MR16. Yep it's true... built right here in Ontario. They just finished their prototype stage and are currently building their production facility. Product is expected to be available by Late Spring and they have just signed a contract to retrofit a major Toronto development with 44,000 lamps.

JoeyD
03-13-2008, 05:27 PM
James everyone knows Unique is not afraid of progression and technology, hence the Multi Tap beyond 14v, I Force, and Hub wiring method. I am however apprehensive about believing you have found an LED module that is so good you are willing to bank your entire buisness on it. I know we have yet to release an LED but I can tell you there are many reasons, most we have already discussed in other threads. On top of that out of the tons of MR16 LED modules we have tested none have lasted and worked as advertised. Mainly becuase none are designed for the landscape, not that MR16's are but MR16's have different specs and design that allow them to work very well in hot and cold.

I would love for you to share your new LED modules with everyone so that there can be other opinions generated then your own. Maybe you could share the manufacturer now of the old one you have used. Again I am skeptical that there is a LED Module that will last and hold up in the harsh environments of the landscape. I would also love to see job photos of projects installed entirely with these LED's. Again James, this isnt about you vs me, this is me being hesitant to buy into ANOTHER GREAT LED product that no one else is using or heard of or installed.

And James one day I may sell LED but I will tell you now, the new future of Outdoor Low Voltage Lighting is 24v Systems and it's here!!!! What will the competiton come up with now, "if you install Unique's 24v transformer you risk causing your family cancer due to the high radiation content found on the EXTREME voltage!!" Just Kiddin! (no I'm not) :)

irrig8r
03-13-2008, 07:02 PM
Anyone heard of this one?

http://www.led-bulbs.com/html/datasheets/4WLEDMR16BULB.pdf

The data sheet mentions landscape lighting.

JoeyD
03-13-2008, 07:38 PM
Anyone heard of this one?

http://www.led-bulbs.com/html/datasheets/4WLEDMR16BULB.pdf

The data sheet mentions landscape lighting.

I will check with our PE inthe morning to see if we have tested this lamp. Something tells me I saw it at the factory...not 100%.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-13-2008, 09:03 PM
Anyone heard of this one?

http://www.led-bulbs.com/html/datasheets/4WLEDMR16BULB.pdf

The data sheet mentions landscape lighting.

Gregg: I have not seen that particular lamp yet, but at first glance the specs. look very good. Then when you start reading carefully the weakness of this lamp becomes apparent. (more on this below)

Physically they look a lot like the stuff coming from all sorts of S.E. Asian manufacturers. Check out the variety available at www.alibaba.com sometime. The problem I have found is that the light output doesnt always resemble the printed specifications. Usually the issue is colour and beam spread.

Also, note the variance in the colour temp of the warm white lamp. I believe it was 2800k to 3500k. So you have to check the ability to order these as batched or binned units. If you don't then you will find some come burning warmer then others. This can be a critical issue with some of the lesser known manufacturers.

Now the kicker for this specific lamp: Read the first set of specification tables and you will see that the warm white lamp has a Luminous Flux -Lm (a popular measurement of intensity or output for LED lamps, essentially LED Lumens) { http://www.lunaraccents.com/educational-LED-lumens.html }of only 40 Lm. The LED lamps I am using have a Luminous Flux of 216 to 220 Lm. This tells me that the lamp you have found from led-bulbs.com will not come close to the output of a Halogen BAB lamp. No need to rush out and test this one... I can assure you it will not be bright enough for Landscape Lighting applications. There are literally hundreds of these types of lamps on the market.

Advances are being made each and every week in LED lighting... there are bound to be some stragglers and hangers on that will buy up the 'old tech' drivers, engines, collimators, lenses, and housings and assemble them to look like todays news. You just have to understand the numbers and do some testing to work your way through this stuff.

Regards.

Chris J
03-13-2008, 09:57 PM
I have a potential client who owns a $4 mil property here in N. FL who wants a total LED system and he wants it to run 24/7. Yep, thats right. He doesn't want it to shut off because he thinks the sh** looks cool on gloomy days. He's a developer from PA, and he seems to be somewhat of a micro-manager, so I'm getting ready to send him up the road. I don't have the experience with LEDs to tackle this large project, so I really don't want it. However, I would be willing to share the lions share of the proceeds for a learning experience. If any of you out there are interested, please give me a call ASAP. I'll have to contact this client within the next few days to let him know of my intentions.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-13-2008, 10:22 PM
Chris... Read your PM.

JoeyD
03-14-2008, 09:56 AM
My PE bassicly just said what James did. This lamp is the same lamp that 15 others have brought to us. We didnt test this particular brand but we tested a few with the same specs...and yeah it sucked.

Mike M
03-14-2008, 10:10 PM
Chris you can borrow my 20 watt equiv bullets (13) if you want to demo, they have three lenses for beam spreads, but I have nothing stronger or an actual wall wash yet. These can be modified for down lights.

I'll have the kichlers in 3 sizes to add to that, when?? Not sure. But the fixtures I have are brass and very slick.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-15-2008, 09:36 AM
Chris you can borrow my 20 watt equiv bullets (13) if you want to demo, they have three lenses for beam spreads, but I have nothing stronger or an actual wall wash yet. These can be modified for down lights.

I'll have the kichlers in 3 sizes to add to that, when?? Not sure. But the fixtures I have are brass and very slick.

Mike: What happens to the light intensity of the DG Lights bullets when you install the various lenses? I would expect it cuts the intensity by some degree. Have you put a light meter on these?

As for modifying a fixture for downlighting... how do you modify them? My rule for downlighting is to only rely on fixtures that are specifically designed for this application. Altering a fixtures' mounting orientation generally exposes a lot of weaknesses and issues, most notably in it's ability to keep water out. Also, when downlighting, are there accessory shields available to eliminate glare?

Have a great day.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-27-2008, 01:48 AM
I have a very new, very awesome LED MR16 Lamp that will be available soon.

If you would like to receive more information, specs. pricing, availability, etc please send me an email with your name, company, address, phone number and email address to my business email and I will register you for a promotion package.

Product should be available by mid April.

This line of LED MR16 Lamps is very advanced and cutting edge stuff, made by a Billion Dollar electrical components manufacturer and backed by them with a full 2 year warranty.

Have a great day.

Pro-Scapes
03-27-2008, 07:40 AM
but do they have a 35w equivelant ?

Mike M
03-27-2008, 07:42 AM
Billy, I just got mine from Sherman.

Pro-Scapes
03-27-2008, 08:20 AM
I need a retrofit right now more than I need a fixture. More like what james is speaking of. I want to do a demo half halogen half LED and see for myself first hand... the fact they are willing to warranty for 2 years plus the fact I do not need to replace the fixture and only the lamp intrigues me.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-27-2008, 09:04 AM
but do they have a 35w equivelant ?

Billy. There is a Canadian company here in Ontario that is just starting production of an LED MR16 that is a 35W halogen equivalent. I am on their list for a shipment of samples as soon as the production line is up.

They have been lauded in the press on this development, and the fact that it is entirely produced here in Canada, not offshore. They recently did a deal that will see 44,000 lamps installed in a retrofit application at a large development here in Toronto.

Stay tuned.... I will keep you all up to date on this one.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-27-2008, 09:10 AM
I need a retrofit right now more than I need a fixture. More like what james is speaking of. I want to do a demo half halogen half LED and see for myself first hand... the fact they are willing to warranty for 2 years plus the fact I do not need to replace the fixture and only the lamp intrigues me.

Billy, it is no secret that I am a fan of LED lamps over LED fixtures, however it is important to understand that these LED lamps must be installed in appropriate fixtures.

1: The fixtures must be moisture proof. You do not want water ingress or condensation to affect the electronics onboard the lamp modules. Most spec. grade fixtures come with an IP rating (ingress protection) You can learn more about IP ratings here: http://www.aquatext.com/tables/ip_ratings.htm

IP65 or better is what I aim for.

2: Heat dissipation is a requirement. You do not want to install these lamps in a composite fixture or one that does not have excellet heat dissipation qualities. Copper, Brass and Bronze fixtures, are best.

Have a great day.

Chris J
03-27-2008, 10:29 PM
Aluminum is better at dissipating heat, isn't it?

Pro-Scapes
03-27-2008, 11:49 PM
Billy, it is no secret that I am a fan of LED lamps over LED fixtures, however it is important to understand that these LED lamps must be installed in appropriate fixtures.

1: The fixtures must be moisture proof. You do not want water ingress or condensation to affect the electronics onboard the lamp modules. Most spec. grade fixtures come with an IP rating (ingress protection) You can learn more about IP ratings here: http://www.aquatext.com/tables/ip_ratings.htm

IP65 or better is what I aim for.

2: Heat dissipation is a requirement. You do not want to install these lamps in a composite fixture or one that does not have excellet heat dissipation qualities. Copper, Brass and Bronze fixtures, are best.

Have a great day.

I have been wiring all systems so they should be LED compatible. I have one client with 114 fixtures eagerly awaiting LED retrofits. He is currently pulling close to 3300w

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-28-2008, 07:50 AM
Aluminum is better at dissipating heat, isn't it?

The thermal conductivity of Copper is almost twice that of Aluminum. Brass and Bronze are a bit of an anomaly as they are alloys that come in many different compositions.

Learn more about this here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_sink

here:
http://environmentalchemistry.com/yogi/periodic/thermal.html

and here:
http://www.engineersedge.com/properties_of_metals.htm

Chris J
03-28-2008, 01:02 PM
The thermal conductivity of Copper is almost twice that of Aluminum.

OK, so that means the copper fixture gets twice as hot. This is why most copper/brass fixtures have a 35w max rating as opposed to a 50w max rating for most aluminum.
What am I missing here? I thought the point of the LED fixtures was to remain as cool as possible.

JoeyD
03-28-2008, 01:06 PM
Brass dissapates heat pretty well, Copper gets super hot, aluminum disapates heat very well. It really boils down tot he surface area and the size of the fixture body.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-28-2008, 01:13 PM
Thermal conductivity guys... not simply absorption and retention!

Copper is a better thermal conductor of heat... meaning it passes the heat more efficiently. Think absorption, distribution and dissipation.

This is why chefs use copper pots and not aluminum pots.

You guys are thinking it only half way through.

It will make more sense if you actually read through the links I posted above.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-28-2008, 01:16 PM
This is why most copper/brass fixtures have a 35w max rating as opposed to a 50w max rating for most aluminum.

Nope, the reason for the difference in ratings is new CSA and ULc standards that put heat limits on fixtures... the newer fixtures on the market tend to be the copper and brass units and they are tested to the updated standards. The older fixtures on the market, the aluminum, are slowly seeing their ratings reduced to 35W max as they are tested to the new standards.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-28-2008, 01:18 PM
It really boils down tot he surface area and the size of the fixture body.

Although surface area and fixture body design does have a lot to do with the ability of a fixture to deal with heat, the fact remains that the thermal conductivity of the fixture materials is a top level factor.

dglights
03-28-2008, 01:30 PM
How is the heat being transfered from the LED lamp to the fixture housing?

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-28-2008, 01:41 PM
Sherman, good to hear from you! I have not had any replies to my inquiries directly to you in some time.

As per your question. In the applications that I am installing LED Lamps there is direct contact between the aluminum body of the lamps and the copper/brass body of the fixtures. In other applications the heat would be transferred through convection alone.

Remember, the new LED lamps I have are quite remarkable... they are running at temperatures below the 65c rating of the nichia led engines inside. The manufacturer has aced the thermal management of these units.

dglights
03-28-2008, 03:10 PM
I apologize for that James, I'll check my mailbox, spam filter gets out of control sometimes.
I was curious because air is a great insulator. What temperature difference are you getting between the 2 style fixtures?

Energy Star requires a minimum 3 yr warranty for solid state lighting. Do you know why they stopped at only 2yr?

Thanks

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-28-2008, 04:18 PM
Sherman. I have not taken any temperature readings off of the body of the fixtures I have tested or installed into. I can tell you that they are barely warm to the touch.. I would guess around 30c-35c. The lamp temperatures (taken from the body of the fixture) vary dramatically... around 30c less with the new lamps.

I have no idea what the considerations are behind the manu's decision to warranty for two years... but for a lamp this is pretty good. Energy Star rating might be a nice touch, but clearly at 3.5w these are efficient.

dglights
03-28-2008, 09:17 PM
Interesting. The 3.5Watt LED is equal to 35Watt halogen?
Has anyone from the warmer climates used these lamps yet?
I would think that would be an excellent demonstration of their performance and reliability.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
03-28-2008, 09:23 PM
Interesting. The 3.5Watt LED is equal to 35Watt halogen?
Has anyone from the warmer climates used these lamps yet?
I would think that would be an excellent demonstration of their performance and reliability.

Nope. Sherman you have some things mixed up there. The 3.4 - 4.4 w LED MR16 lamp I am distributing is equivalent to a 20W BAB or 2060 depending on the spec.

There is a canadian firm that is bringing a LED MR16 lamp on line in the next few weeks that has a 35W FMW equivalency. I have not seen this lamp yet, or tested it, but they have made the news with it and secured some pretty large orders for it. Stay tuned.

dglights
03-28-2008, 09:30 PM
Got it. I'm familiar with the Canadian MR16 35Watt coming out.
I see their website is being worked on. Can you get a spec sheet from them?

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
04-15-2008, 10:24 PM
I have just got the results from a body temperature test that I have performed on a bunch of different LED MR16 lamps.

The Protocol: I installed various LED MR16 Lamps into Lumiere 203 fixtures (sealed fixtures with little air space) and powered up the lamps with 11.5 Vac for a period of 8 hours to allow them and the fixture to reach max. operating temperature.

The measurement: I used a REED Laser IR thermometer to gather the temperatures and took multiple readings to find the highest body temperature.

The results: The New MR16 LED Lamp that I have found has an operating body temperature of only 36 deg Celsius! This is phenomenal given the application in which I tested it. Significantly below the max operating temperature of 65 deg. Celsius that the LED engines specify.

At 36 C, this new lamp blows away the competition. I have many different LED lamps here and the next coolest operating lamp runs at 42C but does not offer anywhere near the output or colour that "My" lamp does. I have a couple of LED Lamps here that were putting out 75C to 87C!!! way too hot to enjoy any real longevity.

If you want an info kit on this new lamp, then simply email me your name, company, address, phone etc and I will register you to receive the info. The 60 Deg. soft flood lamps are in N. America now and the 38 Deg. units are on their way... 3- 4 more weeks.

Have a great day.

Pro-Scapes
04-15-2008, 10:56 PM
One Key factor either you neglected to post or I missed was, what was the ambient temp ?

This is cruicial information. If you had it outside and it was still slushy snow for you then it is a void test for us southern boys. Now if you had it in a 80 deg F room then your on to something.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
04-15-2008, 11:01 PM
The tests were conducted in my heated shop Billy. The ambient temperature being around 20 Deg C.

No worries, I will do more of these tests as the temps increase here. I will be sure to do one when the ambient temperatures are 30+ Deg C. here, in July and Aug

JoeyD
04-16-2008, 12:30 PM
James,
According to our PE and others in regards to temp readings....the IR should be fairly accurate for testing the fixture body but to get accurate temp readings on not just the body but inside ambient temp. (which will be different) you should use a Thermal Coupler. Just FYI thats all. We have done this a few times and learned that the IR was not giving us accurate readings.

vjmac887
04-16-2008, 04:41 PM
I have heard about LED's installed in some exterior site pole lights. One problem that occured in colder areas was when temperatures dropped below freezing and ice and snow would form on the fixtures- the LED's would not get warm enough to melt the ice off of the fixture heads.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
04-16-2008, 06:10 PM
I installed about 500 LED MR16 in tree mounted downlights in 2007, we then had one heck of a snowy, icy, and long winter... So far so good.

Also, LEDs actually love operating in colder ambient temperatures.

Finally, In our applications as downlights, snow and ice never form over the lens of the fixtures... they are aimed down after all. In uplighting applications, in areas of heavy snow fall you would probably not generate enough heat to melt the snow after a significant snowfall, but over the course of hours and days, the heat generated by the LED lamps is enough to gradually melt the snow and keet the lenses clear in most applications.

Regards.

JSLDesign
09-04-2008, 03:30 PM
Date Announced: 21 Aug 2008

-- Expanding portfolio of energy-efficient LED products

Peachtree City, GA -– Cooper Lighting, a division of Cooper Industries, Ltd. (NYSE: CBE) announces the addition of LED recessed lighting to its Halo downlighting product line. Designed for new construction and existing applications, the LED recessed lighting features a Halo LED module that installs into a new construction housing or into existing Halo and All-Pro housings. The new Halo LED downlight offers the benefits of energy savings, long life, improved quality of light, reduced maintenance, and may help to protect the environment by reducing the electrical load and lowering power plant emissions when compared to traditional light sources.

Providing excellent color quality with a rendering of 80 CRI and a warm white color temperature (3045K nominal), the Halo LED recessed fixture delivers over 600 lumens (comparable in light output and light distribution to a 65 watt BR30 lamp or 18 watt compact fluorescent fixture). Its superior optical design provides good cutoff and low glare. The recessed fixture exceeds high efficacy requirements for California’s Title 24, with energy savings in excess of 75% when compared with a 65 watt incandescent lamp. Virtually maintenance-free, the Halo LED fixture is constructed to provide 50,000 hours of life. (The Halo LED fixture could last up to 20 years when used six hours per day.) Plus, for additional energy savings, the LED module is dimmable to approximately 15% using standard AC incandescent analog dimmers and approximately 5% with dimmers that have a low end trim adjustment.

Ideally suited for commercial, hospitality, healthcare, retail and residential applications, the downlight accepts a number of trim options including a reflector, baffle and lensed shower trim.

LEDs are quickly being adopted as an illumination solution for general lighting applications. Energy-conscious markets are focusing on high-efficacy LED lighting systems to capitalize on the longevity and convenience of solid-state lighting. Due to LED’s solid-state principles—no filament to break—the light source is not susceptible to vibration reducing the risk of premature failure. The sustainability of the fixture dramatically reduces maintenance and service costs over traditional sources. The Halo LED module is designed to last up to five times longer than a fluorescent source or 50 times longer than an incandescent.

bmwsmity
09-11-2008, 03:08 PM
LEDs are much closer than what a lot of people want to believe, maybe because it will severely cut into maintenance charges? Who knows.

I still offer my maintenance program for LED systems, at around half the price. This still gives me around the same profit per hour, because I no longer have to buy bulbs...not to mention the time it saves me by not having to run and get more bulbs if I'm out of a certain type when I get to the job site.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
10-29-2008, 09:48 PM
Five fixture makers pick new GE white LEDs
24 Oct 2008
Lumination LLC boasts five OEMs are using GE's Vio high-power white LED in commercial and residential fixtures.

Approximately a year after the (market) introduction of GE's Vio high-power white LED, five lighting fixture manufacturers are marketing and selling commercial and residential fixtures that incorporate the chip-on-board LED package from Lumination LLC, GE Consumer & Industrial's LED business.
"These fixture OEMs are leading a shift toward accent and general lighting with efficient, reliable GE LEDs that will last as long as the fixture. This is the future of lighting," says David Elien, Lumination's president & CEO.

Vio high-power white LEDs contain a violet-emtting chip and appropriate phosphors, and produce less than a 75K color shift over a 50,000-hour rated life. According to Lumination, this means they are able to overcome many of the inherent color control issues of standard blue with yellow phosphor or RGB LED devices. This enhanced color stability allows Vio to more closely mirror halogen or incandescent light quality.

"We like the violet LED technology because it minimizes color variation but still allows for color temperature flexibility," says Douglas Grove, president of 3Style Architectural Lighting, the first fixture company to commit to using the GE LED in a fixture.

"This mix of consistency and control makes it a perfect choice for general or specialized lighting applications such as under-shelf, pathway or accent downlighting. The GE Vio offers the best balance of quality white light, life and energy efficiency with the most vivid color rendering," continued Grove.

OEMs currently offering Vio–powered fixtures include: 3Style Architectural Lighting, Ardee Lighting, Barbican Architectural Products, Gardco and Lightolier.

JoeyD
10-30-2008, 10:46 AM
I will make a post in the Unique forum but we have decided to move forward and offer the Kumho LED lamp as a direct lamp replacement for just about all of our MR16 products. We have found the Kumho to be just as James had promised as being the best LED lamp module we have tested to date. We have been running tests since or a little before Lightfair on this lamp and it far out performs the Ushio and a few others in output and color. I will post some pictures when I get all the details togeather of the release.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
10-31-2008, 08:41 AM
I will make a post in the Unique forum but we have decided to move forward and offer the Kumho LED lamp as a direct lamp replacement for just about all of our MR16 products. We have found the Kumho to be just as James had promised as being the best LED lamp module we have tested to date. We have been running tests since or a little before Lightfair on this lamp and it far out performs the Ushio and a few others in output and color. I will post some pictures when I get all the details togeather of the release.

That is great news and quite the endorsement Joey! :clapping:

Thanks for posting this notice here on the forum.

In a fun way.... " I told you so! " :cool2:

For those of you who would like to get your hands on these excellent LED MR16 lamps right away for testing and use in your lighting systems, please send me a Private Message (PM) and I will be happy to point the way to a prompt, efficient and exclusive distributor of the Luxxo LED lamp.

Have a Brighter day!

Venturewest
11-02-2008, 08:37 AM
Wow! That is huge news. I have to get my hand on some of these. I would think other manu's are just about going to have to follow suit.



I will make a post in the Unique forum but we have decided to move forward and offer the Kumho LED lamp as a direct lamp replacement for just about all of our MR16 products. We have found the Kumho to be just as James had promised as being the best LED lamp module we have tested to date. We have been running tests since or a little before Lightfair on this lamp and it far out performs the Ushio and a few others in output and color. I will post some pictures when I get all the details togeather of the release.

JoeyD
11-03-2008, 12:28 PM
We should release this week. We are putting togeather our pricing as I type!!

And yes James, you did tell me so!! LOL

steveparrott
11-03-2008, 05:35 PM
I will make a post in the Unique forum but we have decided to move forward and offer the Kumho LED lamp as a direct lamp replacement for just about all of our MR16 products. We have found the Kumho to be just as James had promised as being the best LED lamp module we have tested to date. We have been running tests since or a little before Lightfair on this lamp and it far out performs the Ushio and a few others in output and color. I will post some pictures when I get all the details togeather of the release.

Joey, are you confident that these lamps will maintain their luminance over prolonged exposure to high temperatures? This is where the rubber hits the road with LED's. LED Manufacturers can crank up the initial luminance to the hilt and make any color they want - it's the thermal maintenance that's at question with all bright LED's. I noticed one MR-16 LED mfg. has down-rated his lamplife from 50,000 to 20,000 - probably because of heat concerns.

JoeyD
11-03-2008, 06:04 PM
We have done no formal or simulated testing to see how long the lamp will last or how long the lumens will uphold over time. Our intent here is to provide our customers with the best MR16 LED lamp replacement we could find. This decision was made purley out of demand and so far our customers are responding positively with the news of us finally providing an LED option. Only time will tell if the LED's will hold up over time in terms of light output.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
11-03-2008, 06:25 PM
Joey, are you confident that these lamps will maintain their luminance over prolonged exposure to high temperatures? This is where the rubber hits the road with LED's. LED Manufacturers can crank up the initial luminance to the hilt and make any color they want - it's the thermal maintenance that's at question with all bright LED's. I noticed one MR-16 LED mfg. has down-rated his lamplife from 50,000 to 20,000 - probably because of heat concerns.

Hi Steve. I have extensively tested the Luxxo LED MR16 lamp and the engineers at Kumho have built an ace product in terms of thermal management. After sealing the lamp inside a Lumiere 203 Bullet, and letting it run for over 100 hours, the highest temperature I could obtain from inside the lamp was 51 Deg. Celsius. (Ambient operating temperature was 21 Deg. C) This is well below the 65 Deg. C. max operating temperature that the LED engine manufacture lists.

I have now installed over 750 units in landscape lighting applications and have had none of them fail prematurely. The LED lamps I installed at my home in April (they burn 7 hrs per night on avg) have displayed no visible reduction in brightness nor any colour shifting.

From what I understand, the thermal management magic comes from the proprietary power management circuit that these lamps employ along with a unique enclosure that works as a fantastic heat sink.

These are the coolest operating LED MR16 lamps I have ever seen or tested.
You really should give me a call and get some for yourself to try.

Have a great day.

steveparrott
11-04-2008, 09:45 AM
James,

I'd like to see you repeat the test under more rigorous conditions that better approximate the types of temperature extremes found in tropical climates.

From what I understand about LED's is that even a short term exposure to elevated temperatures permanently deteriorates the LED. It could be that a couple weeks of 95 degree F. weather could significantly lower ongoing luminance and lamp life.

From LRC: "Prolonged heat can significantly shorten the useful life of many LED systems. Higher ambient temperature leads to higher junction temperatures, which can increase the degradation rate of the LED junction element, possibly causing the light output of an LED to irreversibly decrease over the long term at a faster rate than at lower temperatures."

The average temperature of Orlando, FL (same in Houston) in August is 83F (28.3C) (from weatherbase.com). This is about 30% higher than your test ambient temp (21C). From my limited knowledge of heat transfer, I estimate that the heat transfer rate is reduced by the same amount. This could push the junction temp past the 65C max.

I suggest you or Kumho publish data at 28C ambient temp for a minimum of 1000 hrs. A 50,000 hr LED should only lose about 1% luminance in that time. If it loses, for example, 5% luminance then you're really looking at a 6,000 hr lamp life.

With all due respect, it's really not helpful to say that your lamps installed 6 months ago (about 1,260 hrs) show no visible reduction in brightness. You won't be able to notice brightness changes of less that 20% or so (you may not even notice bigger brightness changes with no reference). A light meter is the only way to measure that, and it must be accurate to within about a hundreth of a footcandle.

I see so many contractors jumping on the band wagon with LED's. Based on what I know of the real life conditions (especially in the warmer climates) I suspect that many LED fixtures being installed today will reach their 70% life at closer to 20,000 hr. than at their promised 50,000 hr. And many of them may degrade even sooner.

The real kicker is that it's impossible to know when the LED gets to 70%. I envision calls from homeowners complaining that their lights are too dim. The contractor will have no way to determine whether or not they've reached the 70% level (unless he's devised an accurate way to measure the luminance in the field and compare it to initial readings). If any warrantees are associated with these LED's, good luck with convincing a manufacturer to replace an expensive fixture or module based on a subjective statement of "dimmness".

I'm afraid to say that manufacturers are happy to jump on board with these early LED units because they are likely never to be made accountable even if the lamps only last (to 70% luminance) for 10,000 or 15,000 hrs. It's really the homeowner and contractor that will face the consequences of their deteriorating lighting designs.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
11-05-2008, 12:42 AM
Steve, I don't live or work in tropical climates and I don't have any type of climate controlled testing chamber. Nor would I suggest do the vast majority of residents, lighting contractors, or designers who are in North America.

To suggest that this lamp is not a viable product because It MIGHT not work to specification in a narrow band of climatic conditions that affect only a proportion of the total market is like throwing the baby out with the bath water.

The Lamp is good. It works to specification in the conditions that I can replicate here. Also, if we were to take your example and suggest that the heat shedding ability of the lamp was reduced by some 30% due to higher ambient operating temperatures, well then it would operate at 65 Celsius which meets the specifications of the LED engines that the lamp uses.

In any case, the Luxxo LED MR16 lamp is the coolest operating lamp of its type that I have ever seen or tested or used. I am confident in its ability to operate to specification in all of the applications in which I am installing it.

There is a lot of premature introduced, poorly designed and poorly constructed products in this category. The Luxxo MR16 LED lamp is heads and tails above the competition.

steveparrott
11-05-2008, 09:01 AM
Fair enough, thanks for taking my comments in a reasonable light. Still, if you are operating as a distributor of these lamps, I suggest you not discount the tropical climates, especially FL and Southern CA: these are the two biggest US markets. The only complaints we've ever received about our incandescant lamps come from Southern states - even incandescants suffer from the high heat. It's not unreasonable to expect that LED's may suffer even more.

If I were in your position, I would get the test data for these lamps operating at higher ambient temperatures. If you find that life is reduced then letting your customers know would be the responsible, ethical way to proceed. It will also protect you from angry customers one or two years down the line.

Eden Lights
11-06-2008, 01:39 AM
I have not read this thread at all, but if you read the latest DOE study it clearly states that Led lamps are not ready for prime time due to heat damage, which they found in tests in all but very low wattages. I will try to find the article, been doing way to much reading as of late.

Eden Lights
11-06-2008, 01:56 AM
http://www.netl.doe.gov/ssl/comm_testing.htm

Pretty boring read I am afraid.

In a nutshell: Lumen to watt ratios drop after about 5 watts and temps are running about 50-80 degrees C on the heatsinks.

Tomwilllight
11-06-2008, 10:52 AM
For additional boring reading that backs up the DOE findings check:

http://www.lrc.rpi.edu/programs/solidstate/assist/pdf/AR-LEDLightEngine-May2008.pdf

LEDs continue to have a huge problem with heat dissipation.

I believe the answer to LED's in the landscape will be found in luminaires that are specifically designed to manage the heat generated by the LED. I've worked with both Kichler's 2nd generation and BK's dedicated LED luminaires and I've found their performance to be impressive... But not so impressive that I have specified them... yet.

How long they will last, I don't know. No one knows... yet.

Tom

PSUTURFGEEK
11-07-2008, 09:14 PM
I just saw the new Led warm series Vista released this week and they are the best looking Led lights I have ever seen or used, they have such a great look and don't have that strange Led color to them, that was my biggest problem with every other led fixture we have tryed.

Mataman
11-08-2008, 11:13 AM
I just saw the new Led warm series Vista released this week and they are the best looking Led lights I have ever seen or used, they have such a great look and don't have that strange Led color to them, that was my biggest problem with every other led fixture we have tryed.

where did you see these at?

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
01-16-2009, 09:53 AM
Here is some interesting new info:

http://techon.nikkeibp.co.jp/english/NEWS_EN/20090106/163635/

Seems Ushio is trying some new things with LEDs. Not that it will be very bright at only 18 Lumens output, but they do say it is for decorative applications only.

David Gretzmier
01-16-2009, 12:28 PM
Although I am trying not to jump on the Christmas bulb thought, I cannot help but think that this is aimed exactly at the c7 and c9 market. It has the exact lumens and bases as the c7 and c9, exact same color as incandescant, so I'm pretty sure this may be the market they are going after. the LED bulbs currently on the market for this application are plastic and diamond faceted, and colorwise are only starting to get close. Further, although they may last 20,000 hours in a lab, the wet freezing environment of open bulb Christmas lights has tended to make plastic LED bulbs fail quicker than vacuum sealed incandescant. If this works, it would be a huge step forward.

Price wise it would be wonderful if they were less expensive than the current LED bulb, as they are about 8-12 times more expensive than incandescant.

Tomwilllight
02-22-2009, 02:36 PM
The winners of the Next Generation Luminaires have been announced. Go to: http://www.ngldc.org/08/winners.stm

This is a competition was sponsored by the Department of Energy. DOE has partnered with the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) and the International Association of Lighting Designers (IALD) to organize this new competition.

DOE's goal: "On-going advances in SSL technology and the growing number of product introductions signal an opportunity to encourage, recognize, and promote LED luminaires suitable for the commercial specification market, implicitly differentiating them from LED products that will not meet the needs of lighting designers, specifiers, and users."

"Products submitted under the market-ready category were those entries claimed by their manufacturers to be in or near production and ready for specification -- that is, all performance and construction parameters were known and fixed. Samples and independent photometry were required in support of each submission. To be recognized in this category, a product needed to attain at least the judges’ minimum evaluation in all performance categories and to meet or exceed ENERGY STAR criteria, where applicable. Twenty-two of the 68 submitted products were recognized by the judges as market-ready..."

To restate the above, this was a competition designed to identify which light fixtures that use LED are really ready for Prime Time. The judges were surprised to find that the vast majority of the required technical information intended to accurately describe and support the LEDs performance was, to state it simply, not trustworthy.

Tom

MAGLIGHTING
02-22-2009, 03:02 PM
The winners of the Next Generation Luminaires have been announced. Go to: http://www.ngldc.org/08/winners.stm

This is a competition was sponsored by the Department of Energy. DOE has partnered with the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) and the International Association of Lighting Designers (IALD) to organize this new competition.

DOE's goal: "On-going advances in SSL technology and the growing number of product introductions signal an opportunity to encourage, recognize, and promote LED luminaires suitable for the commercial specification market, implicitly differentiating them from LED products that will not meet the needs of lighting designers, specifiers, and users."

"Products submitted under the market-ready category were those entries claimed by their manufacturers to be in or near production and ready for specification -- that is, all performance and construction parameters were known and fixed. Samples and independent photometry were required in support of each submission. To be recognized in this category, a product needed to attain at least the judges’ minimum evaluation in all performance categories and to meet or exceed ENERGY STAR criteria, where applicable. Twenty-two of the 68 submitted products were recognized by the judges as market-ready..."

To restate the above, this was a competition designed to identify which light fixtures that use LED are really ready for Prime Time. The judges were surprised to find that the vast majority of the required technical information intended to accurately describe and support the LEDs performance was, to state it simply, not trustworthy.

Tom

Looks like 1 outdoor lighting fixture is ready for market according to the website

Tomwilllight
02-22-2009, 03:10 PM
To be honest, I don't know if any other manufacturers of landscape lighting entered... It was widely promoted...

Tom

Lite4
02-22-2009, 04:17 PM
Looks like 1 outdoor lighting fixture is ready for market according to the website

Not a lot of output on that fixture, only 19 lumens per watt.