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INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
12-17-2007, 03:26 PM
Today we all lost a truly remarkable man.

Please take a moment and reflect on what this one individual has done to change all of our lives....

May you rest in peace Mr. William J. Locklin


"Earlier this morning Bill Locklin was called home. I ask each of you, his dear friends, to pray for him, his wife Lavesta, and, all his family during this sad time. I encourage you to remember all of his good works, kind deeds, words of encouragement, sage advice, and direct challenges to be better at everything in your life. Family meant a lot to Bill and you were all part of his extended family. Bill was like a second dad to me as I know he was to many of you. I grieve along with you. Please keep him in your thoughts and prayers." Rob DiShino.

irrig8r
12-17-2007, 05:20 PM
Rest in Peace my friend.

NightScenes
12-17-2007, 05:36 PM
Bill was an icon in this industry, God rest his soul.

klkanders
12-17-2007, 06:32 PM
I did not have the pleasure to have met him. From what I understand he had earned the respect of many. Thats good enough for me. We would all be lucky to come close.

JoeyD
12-17-2007, 07:02 PM
I was so shocked to hear this today. Bill Locklin pionered our industry and without him it would have been impossible for it to be as popular and as succesfull as it was with him. He is an icon who's legacy will live forever. Rest in peace Bill and may God bless your family.

Joey D.
Unique Lighting Systems

Chris J
12-17-2007, 09:32 PM
Sad to see him go, but I'm sure the pearly gates he walks through are illuminated beyond his wildest dreams. Farewell Bill! You will be missed by many.

pete scalia
12-17-2007, 09:56 PM
We have lost a legend. God rest his soul.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
12-17-2007, 10:18 PM
From my visit with Bill - December 2006.

seolatlanta
12-17-2007, 10:29 PM
I was just reading his book last night - I was thinking of how much he has to teach and how he really created an industry. He had made many mistakes along with so many great awesome things and wrote about them and how a mistake is an opportunity for growth.

I heard he had a book out a while back. So I called the office and requested a copy and I got an autographed copy in the mail 3 days later.

He wrote-
"David- Thanks so much for being my friend."

If you read the book he stresses friends doing business with friends.

johnh
12-17-2007, 11:53 PM
I was just reading his book last night - I was thinking of how much he has to teach and how he really created an industry. He had made many mistakes along with so many great awesome things and wrote about them and how a mistake is an opportunity for growth.

I heard he had a book out a while back. So I called the office and requested a copy and I got an autographed copy in the mail 3 days later.

He wrote-
"David- Thanks so much for being my friend."

If you read the book he stresses friends doing business with friends.

The book is definitely a good read, many lessons to learn, both in and between the lines. Bill certainly was an icon, a philanthropist, a mentor and a friend. He will be dearly missed. His legacy lives on.
JH

Lite4
12-18-2007, 12:22 AM
He wrote-
"David- Thanks so much for being my friend."

If you read the book he stresses friends doing business with friends.



Wow, sounds like he would have been a great guy to know. I am sure he will be missed, but his legacy will live on and on after him.

pete scalia
12-18-2007, 12:26 AM
Best of the Best. Only ever can be one. Never to be seen again in this business.

pete scalia
12-18-2007, 12:32 AM
Said like a true legend. Even though he took the low road and slammed Unique, Hadco, John Deere and Ewing.


This is not a Hallmark greeting card,
I took 50 years to earn this!

When we say Assembled With Pride—Here are the “Made in the USA” assemblers.

These are the Powercenter “Made in the USA” professionals.



Brass foundry crew…Poured in Redlands, CA…Not South America

Our creative art deparment — Hands on…not a Madison Ave Hot Shot.



Nightshift Powder crew - over 125 colors in stock.

After many long years, Rebekah is now a graduated landscape architect. Do you have one on your staff?

Shipping Department and Manuel…one of 30+ years employment. These are human beings that make, admit and correct mistakes.



Our fabrication deparment-want it 2″ shorter? Want it stainless? Have your own design that you want made? Does this sound like Hadco or Unique?

The office support staff with over 125 years of service to the 12 volt industry.



I’m proud of the profitable industry built for contractors and loyal distributors. John Deere and Ewing are quite successful in turning a contractors specialty into a commodity.

I didn’t and I won’t.

Bill Locklin

Pro-Scapes
12-18-2007, 10:18 AM
Really sad. I never had the oppurtunity to meet or speak with him but I really do appreciate all he has done for our industry and his innovative ideas that were copied.

May God watch over him now and bless his family with the strenght they need to overcome thier huge loss. I really hope the folks at Nightscaping have the desire to continue all his hard work and continue his dreams.

Rest in Peace Bill. Thank you for all you have done for our industry.

irrig8r
12-18-2007, 10:10 PM
If anyone would like to leave a comment, or read what others have to say, go here:

http://www.nightscaping.com/site1/?p=73

pete scalia
12-19-2007, 09:12 PM
If anyone would like to leave a comment, or read what others have to say, go here:

http://www.nightscaping.com/site1/?p=73

Very sad indeed. Interesting to read the condolences left by others. No one had a bad word.

eskerlite
12-20-2007, 08:11 AM
There is no greater Man in Lighting than Bill Locklin. He will be missed but never forgotten. His greatest quote was "Clients think Low Voltage lighting is expensive. Lets not dissapoint them."
Sean C.

irrig8r
12-20-2007, 11:55 AM
Said like a true legend. Even though he took the low road and slammed Unique, Hadco, John Deere and Ewing.


Pete.

I think he had a point there about how lighting is being turned into a commodity. What I think he meant was that these larger distributors, working with manufacturers who want more market share, have made lighting accessible to just about anybody who wants to get started in it.

A lot of distributors and manufacturers these days offer free seminars. Bill figured the information was useful enough that people would pay for it.

I first met Bill back in 1989 at a two day seminar he put on with their distributor at the time, KKW. I can't remember what I paid, but all of it was brand new to me and worth it. (It would later be expanded into Nightscaping University.) I installed my first lighting job a couple months later.

Bill always put the contractor first, sometimes to the point of ticking off distributors. He obtained his contractors license in 1946, kept it current and active, and often called himself a wire twister.....

Take a look:

http://www2.cslb.ca.gov/General-Information/interactive-tools/check-a-license/License+Detail.asp?LicNum=83633


Bill was a great man, and he was a good and generous man. He was a remarkable visionary and he was down to earth. He had solid values and strong opinions.

Bill never stopped learning and he always found ways to share what he learned. If I live to be an "old dog" I'll look to Bill's example for learning "new tricks".

pete scalia
12-20-2007, 08:24 PM
I agree with the commodity part but I also think it's hypocritical. If he felt that way then why does he sell his products through those 2 distributors if he was true to his convictions?

As for the free seminars, Nightscaping has done their share of free seminars too.

What has Nightscaping done to protect the contractor from this "commoditization" ?

I'm not knocking the man and I have no reason to believe what you say about him is untrue. But let's be honest here. He played on the same field with all of these commoditizers and contributed to it equally.

irrig8r
12-20-2007, 10:38 PM
I agree with the commodity part but I also think it's hypocritical. If he felt that way then why does he sell his products through those 2 distributors if he was true to his convictions?

As for the free seminars, Nightscaping has done their share of free seminars too.

What has Nightscaping done to protect the contractor from this "commoditization" ?

I'm not knocking the man and I have no reason to believe what you say about him is untrue. But let's be honest here. He played on the same field with all of these commoditizers and contributed to it equally.

I'd actually like to move this discussion to another thread Pete and not hijack this one.

pete scalia
12-20-2007, 10:54 PM
I'd actually like to move this discussion to another thread Pete and not hijack this one.

I don't care to discuss it any further. I don't care to dis this great man (not said facitiously). Just the facts man. keep it real.

irrig8r
12-27-2007, 11:18 AM
A nice video tribute to Bill where you see a little more of his personal side...

http://hk.youtube.com/watch?v=HvJv8SRDC3k&feature=related

irrig8r
12-27-2007, 11:19 AM
Ran across this too: http://www.vistapro.com/Files/news/VistaNews_12.1.pdf

irrig8r
12-27-2007, 11:25 AM
This is from Bill's hometown paper, The Redland Daily Facts...

Pioneer in lighting dies at 86

Article Launched: 12/22/2007 11:29:43 PM PST


REDLANDS - William J. "Bill" Locklin, founder and president of Redlands-based Nightscaping outdoor lighting business and "father" of 12-volt outdoor lighting, died Dec. 17 at his home in Redlands, after a yearlong illness with cancer. He was 86.
Locklin was also an orange grower and co-owner of Redlands' El Camino horse ranch.

He was born in 1921 in Alhambra and was raised as an orphan in Lucerne before moving to Colton to attend high school.

He served as a chief electrician with the U.S. Navy aboard the USS Trepang submarine during World War II, earning a Bronze Star for action in the Pacific.

After the war, he returned to Colton and was a member of the Colton City Council for several years.

He settled in Redlands in 1953 and established Locklin Electric, doing interior electrical work and doing favors for customers who wanted lighting to show off their landscaping.

His first exterior lighting job was at a Palm Springs church, to welcome Dwight and Mamie Eisenhower to a service.

The Nightscaping trademark was registered June 2, 1964, and in the Christmas season of 1964 Nightscaping was used to decorate the outdoor tree at the White House.

Later, President Richard Nixon and his wife, Pat, used Nightscaping in the landscaping of their "Western White House" in San Clemente.

During the 1950s and '60s, Locklin also ran the lighting for Redlands Bowl Summer Music Festival programs.

In 1987 he returned to Washington, D.C., where he lit the pathways in the park around the White House Christmas tree.
He was selected to light the Moving Wall, a half-size traveling replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, when it was in Sylvan Park in Redlands this year in June, and before that when it was at Riverside National Cemetery.

Locklin provided the lighting for the structure in Ed Hales Park in downtown Redlands and at one time had also provided lighting for State Street.

His designed lighting plans for homes and businesses all over the world, often designing new fixtures to meet his customers' needs.

Locklin was active in community organizations, including contributing to the Boys & Girls Club of Redlands and providing workers and lighting in the building of the Assistance League of Redlands' dental clinic this year.

He supported landscape architecture students at Cal Poly Pomona and provided scholarships for the American Society of Landscape Architects Foundation.

He hired people with developmental disabilities and was the businessman who was there for many people in need, his family said. He also donated building space to Mexican Christian Children's Aid, an organization that collects goods and takes them to Mexico.

Rod Tapp, professor emeritus of landscape architecture at Cal Poly Pomona, said Locklin was generous to landscape architecture students at Cal Poly and said he was inspirational to many young people who made careers in landscape lighting.

Tapp also praised Locklin's contributions in other areas.

"The Boys & Girls Club of Redlands probably exists because of his contributions to it,"he said.

Tapp also mentioned El Camino horse ranch, which Locklin owned with his wife, and said many children's dreams were realized there when they took riding lessons.

Locklin had been active in several churches in Redlands throughout his life, including Presbyterian, Methodist, Bethany Reformed, Redlands Christian Center and the Packinghouse Church.

He was a member of the American Society of Landscape Architects; the National Electrical Contractors Association and its National Educational Council; and the Illuminating Engineering Society of America.

Survivors include his wife LaVesta Locklin; his daughter Billie Ylvisaker and husband Tom of Redmond, Wash.; four stepchildren, Scott Reeves of Stockton, Kan., Lesli Woolley and husband Craig of Highland, Stan Reeves and Kristin Reeves of Riverside; nine grandchildren, Amy Miller and husband Curt of Redmond, Wash., Kristen Stewart and husband Michael of Seattle, Laura Cooper and husband Corban of Redmond, Wash., Rebecca Gaines and husband Ben of Temecula, Vandi Reeves of Grand Terrace, whom Bill and LaVesta Locklin raised, and Jessica, Ryan, Morgan and Aaron Woolley of Highland; seven great-grandchildren, many nieces and nephews and many "adopted" sons and daughters who considered Bill Locklin their "other dad."

His first wife, Amy Lue Locklin, preceded him in death, as did his daughter Lue Ann McKay, brother Harry Locklin and sister Faye Locklin.

Memorial services will be at 1 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 27, at the Packinghouse Church, 27165 W. San Bernardino Ave., Redlands, with a reception to follow at the Locklin home in Redlands. Cortner Chapel is handling arrangements.

Memorial donations may be made to Redlands Homeless Shelter, sent to Redlands Christian Center, c/o Pastor Don Wallace, P.O. Box 7718, Redlands, CA 92375; or to Mexican Christian Children's Aid, sent to MCCA, 1705 E. Colton Ave., Redlands, CA 92374.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
12-27-2007, 11:57 AM
Gregg. Thank you for keeping this thread up to date and ongoing.

Regards.

irrig8r
12-27-2007, 12:10 PM
You're welcome James.

Today is Bill's memorial service and I'm sorry I won't be there.... a couple hundred miles away and just too many things going on here with out of town guests, etc.

I hope another more public memorial takes place... and I suspect Bill's name will come up at the AOLP.

Got this Nightscaping Newsletter today too:

http://www.nightscaping.com/newsletter/pdf/in_memory_of_bill.pdf

irrig8r
01-03-2008, 03:21 PM
Found this video about transformers on the NS website from 2003 for those of you who never had a chance to meet Bill.

http://www.nightscaping.com/videos/Transformer%20Re-edit%202003.MPG

irrig8r
01-15-2008, 02:07 PM
This was in today's Vista Lighting Newsletter.


Vista joins the industry in mourning the passing of William J. Locklin, the founder of Nightscaping (R).

Known as the "Father of the Landscape Lighting Industry", Bill Locklin's pioneering vision created the modern landscape lighting market of today.

He became a licensed contractor in 1946 and started his own contracting firm, Locklin Electric, in 1953. He launched Nightscaping in 1959 and was directly involved in early lighting installations for many notable celebrities including Presidents Eisenhower, Johnson and Nixon.

Locklin is widely remembered and respected for his unwavering commitment to the professional outdoor lighting contractor. Many generations benefited from his passion and his ideas.

Today, thousands of professionals earn a living that came directly from Bill Locklin's vision, hard work and dedication. His pioneering efforts laid the groundwork for the prosperous industry we all enjoy today.

Bill Locklin will be missed, but never forgotten!